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I took the insert out of the left fairing pocket and can see the switch. How do I get the hazard switch out so I can follow Fred's advice on servicing it?
 

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I took the insert out of the left fairing pocket and can see the switch. How do I get the hazard switch out so I can follow Fred's advice on servicing it?
To get the switch out, you didn't need to take the pocket out. All you need to remove is the left trim strip, the allen bolt holding the instrument cluster, then a flat blade screwdriver to press in the tab right below the allen bolt. Gently pull the cluster plate away from the opposite side and the whole face plate and instrument cluster should slide out.

Once you get the cluster out, hang a clean rag from the opening over the top shelter near where your knee fits to keep your top shelter from getting scratched. There is a plate over the back of the cluster held by tabs that can be removed by carefully prying it off. Now you should have access to the back of the switch.

Remove the two screws holding it in, then the power for the backlight. Okay, now be careful here. There is a cover on the switch that the electrics connect too. There are four tabs that can be pryed off and the cover with the electrical connects will come away from the switch. Under the cover there is a plunger that is held in place by the cover.

The plunger has a spring, that will fly off into oblivion at the mear suggestion of distrubance (don't ask me how I know!). Once you have it this far I think you will find that your switch is full of road grime. The dialectic grease is probably all mucked up. If you ask me this design is pretty poor. Cleaning the switch and replacing the grease is in order.

All in all, getting the switch out is pretty easy and should only take 30 minutes tops. I lost the spring from mine, so I took a wire tie and wrapped it around the plunger to keep it from activating. I will get around to either getting a new spring or a new switch eventually. (does a motorcycle need emergency lights anyway :? ?)

FYI ... 2004 Wing, your model may vary.
 

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This is how I fixed mine. Not sure how long it will last but works great so far.:biker:

http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?t=204257
It probably will work, and if you loose the spring like I did, then it IS a better solution. I have to believe though, based on all the gunk that I took out of mine that at some point it will fail. I think the switch design is poor, and lets debris into the mechanism. So no matter what the fix, I would always have that little bit of a twinge when I pushed the button again. For me, I think I will forgo the stress and leave it deactiviated or may be find a better switch.
 

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I fixed the switch twice on my 02. Now on my 06 I have no idea if the flashers work and I'm not going to find out either.
 

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I didn't take my switch apart. After I removed the swith panel, I removed the switch and just sprayed some WD40 down the front of it, and then worked the switch about 3 dozen times. It took about 10 presses for it to work loose. It has been fine for over a year now.
 

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I think that WD40 is a solvent and not a lubricant. When I took my switch panel off, I cleaned the back of the switches liberally with contact cleaner, then I abundantly sprayed the switch with Tri-Flow, which when dry, leaves a teflon film on the sprayed surfaces. I haven't had a problem since.

Mike
 

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I use silicon grease because it doesn't dry up and it also acts as a barrier to moisture and dirt. But you have to remove the switch and take it all apart and clean it and then put the grease inside the switch.

I would advise you to put the switch inside a plastic baggie when you take it apart so you don't loose the spring.

You have to remove the left panel, and then take the back side of the panel off to access the switch. If my memory is correct, there also is a screw inside the panel that you have to remove to release the switch from the housing.

If you are in a hurry and just want to release a stuck switch and don't have time to mess with it, try pressing all the way in, while slightly lifting UP on the bottom edge of it. This will many times let the lock mechanism release.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks

I pulled the cover off and sprayed it with WD-40, bingo!

Don't feel the need to ever use that switch ever again.

Thanks for all the help

JC
 

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Hazard switch delima

I took the insert out of the left fairing pocket and can see the switch. How do I get the hazard switch out so I can follow Fred's advice on servicing it?
I just fixed the same problem by using PB Blaster to unstick the switch, with out removing the switch. Saved a lot of coin by reading this and other posting. I thank you and now I am a reader.:agree:
 

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I didn't take my switch apart. After I removed the switch panel, I removed the switch and just sprayed some WD-40 down the front of it, and then worked the switch about 3 dozen times. It took about 10 presses for it to work loose. It has been fine for over a year now.
This will probably sound like a rant to some of you that have seen my posts about WD-40 before, but that stuff is NOT a cure all for electronics. Its main ingredient is fish oil and it was primarily designed to remove moisture from metal and as a secondary, it acts like a mild solvent and lubricant. For those purposes, it is PERFECT. Those of you that own boats or work around fresh or salt water environments will find D-40 a really handy and extremely useful tool.

The problem is that after D-40 has done its job of displacing moisture, dissolving, and lubricating, it needs to be removed from anywhere that would collect dust and dirt. If you don't, then it attracts dust and dirt like crazy and turns into a gooey mess, jamming up whatever you want clean and functional.

For cleaning electrical switches, I have found that a Contact Cleaner and Lubrication sold by Radio Shack works great. The one I am talking about comes in a small aerosol can with a white label and pink and black lettering. Do not confuse this with the Contact Cleaner they sell that is in a larger aerosol can painted blue. It does not have the lubricant and only cleans. Neither of these leave a residue that attracts dust and dirt but the small can leaves behind a dry lubricant, so it works magic on sticky electrical switches.

If I just want a lubricant, I use Tri-Flow spray. It is made with Teflon and a solvent that goes away after application, leaving a dry (non-oily) slippery surface. People that have guns to clean and keep working swear by this stuff. It is wonderful and you can use this stuff instead of WD-40 if lubrication is your main goal.

I used to use dry graphite powder in many of these same situations but that stuff is so messy and hard to get into many places. Graphite is great for keeping lock mechanisms working in cold temperatures and it definitely does not collect dust and dirt, so I still have some one hand for when the situation calls for it.

If I need something to penetrate through gunk (like old built up WD-40) or rusty metal, then I use Liquid Wrench. I know that it is somewhat old school and others swear by some newer products that work faster, better, deeper, etc, but Liquid Wrench is dependable and I know how it performs.

If I need a fine light weight lubricant, I have not found anything better than 3-in-1 oil. Again, old school, but it is still around because it is a great light weight oil. Just use sparingly or like WD-40, it can collect dust and dirt and create a mess.

Sorry for high jacking this thread, but using the right product for the job is important and I want to share my experience for using some of my favorites.

Cheers.
 

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You want it off.

Squirt contact cleaner in space at switch

open up channellocks around button sticking out

carefully pull up

work switch in and out several times

30 second fix
 

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+1 on Triflow. It's an excellent lubricant. I now use it on the rubber grommets for the tupperware side panes as well. When I first got the bike, it seemed like every time I took one off there was a grommet pushed out.
 

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WD-40's main ingredients, according to U.S. Material Safety Data Sheet information, are:

50%: Stoddard solvent (i.e., mineral spirits -- primarily hexane, somewhat similar to kerosene)

25%: Liquefied petroleum gas (presumably as a propellant; carbon dioxide is now used instead to reduce WD-40's considerable flammability)

15+%: Mineral oil (light lubricating oil)

10-%: Inert ingredients

The FISH OIL story is Urban Legend
 

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Mark, I understand your concerns, and your thoughts are shared by many. However, in my experience, most of the concerns that are widely shared about WD40 are of little concern and are grossly overblown. Plain old oil or grease is going to attract more dirt than a thin layer of WD40.

My first stuck switch on my 02 was the mute switch when the bike was one year old. 6 years later the mute switch still works fine. If you want an even more extreme case, a couple of years ago my table saw worm gears were all gummed up from saw dust mixing with the grease put on at the factory. I cleaned it all off and sprayed it with WD40. Many, Many projects later, the worm gears still work smoothly with nothing gumming up the mechanism.

As an electronics technician, I have access to some of the best, most expensive contact cleaners and degreasers made today, but yet in many cases, techs will opt for good old fashioned, off the shelf WD40 for one simple reason. It works. I have sprayed switches 20 years ago that are still functioning perfectly today with no additional maintenance.

My only warning about WD40 is to never spray it on anything other than 12volt applications or lower. It is flammable. Spraying it in one of your house switches could be hazardous. But it is perfectly safe in 12volt electronics.

The products you mention that have graphite and teflon in them may work ok for the mechanical part of the switch, but are not good for the electrical contacts. (BTW, I bought a can of the Radio Shack cleaner out of desparation a few years back and found it to be worthless for cleaning dirty and oxidized contacts. I threw the can in the trash.)

I would like to share my reasons that I often recommend WD40 on this board over other products.

1. Every house has at least one can on the shelf.

2. It's cheap.

3. It will not attack plastics. Many of the cleaners on the market will destroy cosmetic parts if it contacts them. This is becoming more and more of a problem every year because stricter EPA regulations has been causing chemical companies to reformulate previously safe,
common products.

4. It excels not only as a lubricant, but in freeing stuck mechanical devices like switch latch mechanisms.

5. Even though it is not designed or advertised as a contact cleaner, it is excellent for that purpose. It outperforms many contact cleaners designed for the purpose, which is astonishing. It's ability to prevent oxidation is also beneficial in preventing switch contacts from corroding in the future. Its viscosity is so light that everything except the most delicate switches can make good contact through the coating layer.

For the purposes of the audience on this website, there are very few products on the market that can match WD40 in all four of those instances. Products like LPS may also work great. I just happen to be partial to WD40. It has served me so well over the years that I have had little incentive to experiment with anything else. There are many people here that trust me when it comes to electrical issues. I would not recommend it unless I was 100% certain of its effectiveness, or if I thought it had a serious drawback.


Plasma and LCD TVs all have a digital video signal bus to the panel called an LVDS cable. (Low Voltage Differential Signal) They all contain a very delicate connector that is prone to going intermittent. Contact cleaners have always been hit or miss in correcting the problem, and many techs have resorted to just ordering a new cable when it goes bad. That was until I found that WD40 fixes nearly 100% of the problems. Now we all use it to clean those contacts.
 

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I no longer use my EOM hazard switch. I have 4 ways anytime I want, key on or not. I completely disabled the EOM after it accidently stuck twice. It's permanently OUT. Click a pic for a page about my $5.00 solution.



 

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WD-40's main ingredients, according to U.S. Material Safety Data Sheet information, are:

50%: Stoddard solvent (i.e., mineral spirits -- primarily hexane, somewhat similar to kerosene)

25%: Liquefied petroleum gas (presumably as a propellant; carbon dioxide is now used instead to reduce WD-40's considerable flammability)

15+%: Mineral oil (light lubricating oil)

10-%: Inert ingredients

The FISH OIL story is Urban Legend
:bow:
Per the MSDS link: http://www.wd40.com/about-us/history/

I am busted in that it does not contain fish oil as I read elsewhere on the web...goes to show you that the web is NOT the all knowing, all seeing, fountain of eternal and perfect knowledge we are all led to believe.
:rolleyes:
 

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Mark, I understand your concerns, and your thoughts are shared by many. However, in my experience, most of the concerns that are widely shared about WD40 are of little concern and are grossly overblown. Plain old oil or grease is going to attract more dirt than a thin layer of WD40.

My first stuck switch on my 02 was the mute switch when the bike was one year old. 6 years later the mute switch still works fine. If you want an even more extreme case, a couple of years ago my table saw worm gears were all gummed up from saw dust mixing with the grease put on at the factory. I cleaned it all off and sprayed it with WD40. Many, Many projects later, the worm gears still work smoothly with nothing gumming up the mechanism.

As an electronics technician, I have access to some of the best, most expensive contact cleaners and degreasers made today, but yet in many cases, techs will opt for good old fashioned, off the shelf WD40 for one simple reason. It works. I have sprayed switches 20 years ago that are still functioning perfectly today with no additional maintenance.

My only warning about WD40 is to never spray it on anything other than 12volt applications or lower. It is flammable. Spraying it in one of your house switches could be hazardous. But it is perfectly safe in 12volt electronics.

The products you mention that have graphite and teflon in them may work ok for the mechanical part of the switch, but are not good for the electrical contacts. (BTW, I bought a can of the Radio Shack cleaner out of desparation a few years back and found it to be worthless for cleaning dirty and oxidized contacts. I threw the can in the trash.)

I would like to share my reasons that I often recommend WD40 on this board over other products.

1. Every house has at least one can on the shelf.

2. It's cheap.

3. It will not attack plastics. Many of the cleaners on the market will destroy cosmetic parts if it contacts them. This is becoming more and more of a problem every year because stricter EPA regulations has been causing chemical companies to reformulate previously safe, common products.

4. It excels not only as a lubricant, but in freeing stuck mechanical devices like switch latch mechanisms.

5. Even though it is not designed or advertised as a contact cleaner, it is excellent for that purpose. It outperforms many contact cleaners designed for the purpose, which is astonishing. It's ability to prevent oxidation is also beneficial in preventing switch contacts from corroding in the future. Its viscosity is so light that everything except the most delicate switches can make good contact through the coating layer.

For the purposes of the audience on this website, there are very few products on the market that can match WD40 in all four of those instances. Products like LPS may also work great. I just happen to be partial to WD40. It has served me so well over the years that I have had little incentive to experiment with anything else. There are many people here that trust me when it comes to electrical issues. I would not recommend it unless I was 100% certain of its effectiveness, or if I thought it had a serious drawback.

Plasma and LCD TVs all have a digital video signal bus to the panel called an LVDS cable. (Low Voltage Differential Signal) They all contain a very delicate connector that is prone to going intermittent. Contact cleaners have always been hit or miss in correcting the problem, and many techs have resorted to just ordering a new cable when it goes bad. That was until I found that WD40 fixes nearly 100% of the problems. Now we all use it to clean those contacts.
LarryM - Thank you for the polite rebuttle to my post (where I helped spread the urban legend of it being based on fish oil)...Oops. :oops:

I am really glad the stuff has worked so well for you over the years. Maybe my life is much dirtier than yours and that is why I have had it create some problems after solving the one I applied it to fix. Maybe I am using it in excess and that is why it collects dirt later on down the road (literally). I still believe that for electrical problems not based on water intruision, there are better solutions <pun intended> than WD-40. On the other hand, you should stick with what has worked for you in the past.

...The products you mention that have graphite and teflon in them may work ok for the mechanical part of the switch, but are not good for the electrical contacts. (BTW, I bought a can of the Radio Shack cleaner out of desparation a few years back and found it to be worthless for cleaning dirty and oxidized contacts. I threw the can in the trash.)...
If you were using the one in the blue and white larger can, I cannot agree more. I have had great results using the smaller white and pink can.

Cheers, and thanks for the opposing opinions. It is a great way to explore other possibilities. :thumbup:
 
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