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Any advice? In 2013 we stopped at the top of bear tooth and I got winded walking to the overlook. Then went back down to Yellowstone without any more thought of it. Then it hit me, I didn’t feel right. Glacier in 2016 was no problem for me but my brother got that queazy feeling by Yellowstone. He touched it out to Cody and felt good by morning. So, any remedies to stave off altitude sickness for flatlanders? I remember watching TOP GEAR when they took Viagra to combat the altitude . I’m not doing that. :)
 

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Mug a geriatric and take his O2 bottle. Beyond that, loose comfortable clothes, hydration, and take it slow. Selecting the highest point for a picnic, although the view is amazing, is not your best choice. If you can spend a couple days in the general area so you can acclimate , that helps as well. Viagra..... now that's funny. Sending oxygenated blood to the wrong head. :surprise:
 

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Stay hydrated with water, have nasal gel for dry nose to prevent nose bleeds, don't push yourself. If your not in good shape, try to get some good walks in prior to the trip.
I’m in great shape...I tell my self. Idk, age is just creeping up on me.
 

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Hydration is the key,, anytime your at elevation over 6K your should be drinking a lot of water and some kind of sport drink. If you wait until your thirsty its too late.
Headache, lack of energy, wanting to go to sleep are all signs of dehydration at elevation.
Beartooth Pass is over 10K If you stayed in Red Lodge for a couple days you were about 6k and should have been hydrating big time.
 

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Hydration is the key,
This. I'm an EMT in Denver, my wife runs an ER.
Thin air is dry air. When a traveler comes in with pretty much any complaint, the first thing we do is drop 1 liter of fluids by IV, often two liters.

First, you lose water with every breath of dry air. Just the act of breathing is drying you out, about 2 liters of water a day lost to breathing.
Plus you're breathing faster and deeper due to less oxygen.

Second, your sweat evaporates before it has a chance to collect on your skin, so you don't even realize you are sweating. Back home, you'd be covered in sweat, but here you feel dry.

So, if you feel wierd, tired,or GET A HEADACHE, immediately pound a liter of water. Drink a half liter before bed and immediately on waking up. Drink water all day.
Minimize alcohol consumption, and realize that alcohol will hit you about twice as hard due to low oxygen levels.
 

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PilotAlan wrote: So, if you feel wierd, tired,or GET A HEADACHE...

Great, I feel that way all the time at 1000 feet where I live. Just a minute I have to go take a leak...:)
 

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So far no altitude problems for me but this thread has been very interesting to read !

About 10 years ago one of my neighbors complained of passing out, dr told him he was dehydrated and asked how much water he drank he claimed to only drink coffee. Today I think he is 93 and still living alone, hopefully he took the doctors advice to drink more water, he seems to be doing pretty well still driving and goes for fish fry every Friday.
 

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I used to go to the Rockies often and never had problems. I got to see altitude sickness with my son one year where he threw up for 24 hours. If I were going today I would stop for a night at 5-6 thousand feet and acclimate. Like others have said hydrate! Then move up being conscious of any symptoms. Stop every couple thousand of elevation for a few hours and hydrate. Then step up again. Sounds like a lot but it’s much better than what can happen even landing you in the hospital.
 

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Those that do really high elevations recommend that, if possible, descend a couple of thousand feet to sleep.

Thus, don't overnight stop at the top of Independence Pass until you've been acclimated to the elevation in Denver for at least an over night stay.

PilotAlan describes it well above.
 

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Did anyone mention staying hydrated??? I think I missed it....:wink2:

Good advice, Alan is spot on. Diamox is the med Tonik is referring to. It might help. One thing is to be sure not to only drink water though. Too much water and you can drive your sodium down and feel just as bad. Be sure to also use some juice, sport drinks, etc, get some sodium and potassium etc in as well.

If you smoke, have any lung disease, are not in the best shape, you're going to feel it over 8,000 ft. Certainly over 10,000. Just be prepared to expect it, take it easy. Return to lower altitude as soon as you can. I have felt it above 12,000... Pike's peak, Mt Evans etc... 20 mins at the top of Mt Evans and I was ready to head back down.

...and, stay hydrated! >:)
 

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Visit Death Valley instead, -282 feet below sea level. That will balance out your high altitude sickness! Just kidding!


Drink water, more than normal, BEFORE ascending. Acclimation is the key way to be successful but if you can't and don't have that time, take an aspirin with that water prior, helps open up blood vessels a bit. Just don't stay too long and descend. Below 8,000 feet and you should be fine and recovered.
 
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