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Morning,

I've always used the old pointer type torque wrench. It was simple and reliable but, it is also cumbersome and awkward when working in tight places i.e. motorcycles....So I bought this new fangled 3/8 drive clickable torque wrench from Great Neck. It's compact and should do the job. The only problem is, I can't figure out how to set the dang thing....It has a long list of cryptic numbers and a rotating dial on the bottom of the handle...There was no manual with it and I am at a complete loss as to how to set this thing...I looked at the digital torque wrenches but I am an armature mechanic and can't justify the cost...Anybody out there help me with this?...

Thanks.
 

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On the top of the handle there should be a ring that says lock and unlock. Twist it to unlock and turn the handle clockwise to increase the torque rating and CCW to lessen the torque value. After using it back the handle off to less than 10lbs of torque when not in use.
 

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One side of the bar is probably marked in ft/lbs, the other in newton meters. If you look in the shop manual it will give you the torque in one or the other. One set of numbers on the bottom part that you twist is ft/lbs the other newton meters. When you screw it in the zero on the dial will match one of the marks on the bar. Then you can add or subtract up or down from zero to get the exact setting. On mine the the bottom in marked one through 10 ft/lbs. I can screw it up to match the fifty mark on the bar and then turn it 5 more lbs to get 55. The newton meters are strange measurements and I have no idea what they mean but you can add and subtract them the same way. Or if in doubt there is always hand tight, arm tight and all you've got.;)
 

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Now, I see why the bag.
 

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At the end of the wrench, there should be a knurled black knob, loosen that knob. Then you can turn the handle. As you tighten the handle, it covers up numbered lines.

If it is like the wrench I saw, it has inch-pounds on the one side, and foot-pounds on the other. As you cover a line, say at 40 foot-pounds, you can continue turning the handle to get something between lines using the scale on the handle. Turn it till it hits the 40 line, and then another half-turn so it lines up with the 5 on the handle, and you have 45 foot-pounds. Tighten the black knob, and use the wrench to tighten. When it clicks, you've hit your mark.

Keep in mind that further tightening will tighten it past the mark, as the wrench will not keep you from turning it further. It just gives that click to tell you where you are at.
 

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Why no instructions? If new, it should have instruction sheet. If you picked it up used, beware, the service life of clickers is limited -- re-calibration at commercial facilities is too expensive compared to replacement cost. Clickers are not as accurate as your beam anyway so DO truct your wrist/elbow if you suspect the wrench should have already clicked -- more hardware has been damaged with clickers than with calibrated wrists!

prs
 

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After using it back the handle off to less than 10lbs of torque when not in use.
Leaving it Pre-set damages the springs! I Concur......
 

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One side of the bar is probably marked in ft/lbs, the other in newton meters. If you look in the shop manual it will give you the torque in one or the other. One set of numbers on the bottom part that you twist is ft/lbs the other newton meters. When you screw it in the zero on the dial will match one of the marks on the bar. Then you can add or subtract up or down from zero to get the exact setting. On mine the the bottom in marked one through 10 ft/lbs. I can screw it up to match the fifty mark on the bar and then turn it 5 more lbs to get 55. The newton meters are strange measurements and I have no idea what they mean but you can add and subtract them the same way. Or if in doubt there is always hand tight, arm tight and all you've got.;)
Hey, ponton, ya forgot the trusty ol' cheater bar for when "all you've got" just ain't enough!
 

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Practice on some inconsequential bolts in the learning process. The biggest trick to using a clicker is to anticipate the click.

Similar to firing a gun. Squeeze the trigger until it fires then STOP. You want the recoil of a gun or the click of the wrench to be a mild surprise, but one which you control.
 

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Max, Just for getting acquainted with your new toy, use a 3/8

square socket to connect clicker to beam.
 

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-- more hardware has been damaged with clickers than with calibrated wrists!

prs
Not even close...unless you're referring to folks who don't know how to use or set a torque wrench. One major problem with things like this is that the user has to be smarter than the tool.

Stu
 

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The Snap type or any other torque wrench must be used correctely. Never jerk any torque wrench to torque. Smoothly pull the handle for more control, "not push" to torque setting and use an even motion. Staight arm is best for higher torques in foot pounds. A properly calibrated and maintained Snap type torque wrench will out perform a bender bar "beam" wrench for consistancy on multiple fasteners. Especially when the hard-nose "by the book" inspectors come around!!!! :eek:4:Oh... also never use any torque wrench to loosen fasteners! :22yikes:
 

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Max, Just for getting acquainted with your new toy, use a 3/8

square socket to connect clicker to beam.
If you have confidence in your beam torque wrench, this will also allow you to compare the clicker to the beam. Not a calibration but is a quick check.
 

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Not even close...unless you're referring to folks who don't know how to use or set a torque wrench. One major problem with things like this is that the user has to be smarter than the tool.

Stu
But Stu; that is one H377 of a leap of faith! :lol:

prs
 

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Guys,
I have a 3/8" torque wrench that's inch lbs & not foot lbs, a friend also bought a 3/8" torque wrench in Sears that is inch lbs, how do you convert inch lbs to foot lbs??
 
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