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I just got back from 300 mile ride and was cleaning up my bike, I took the key out to open the side pocket on my 2010 and now I can't get the key all the way back into the ignition. It goes in about an inch, (so it's sticking out about a half inch farther than usual) then feels like it's bottoming out on solid steel. Messing around with it I did find if I stick it in just about a quarter inch I can turn the ignition either way which seems weird, but it's still not engaging to turn on the lights or be able to start it. Anyone have any Ideas? I tried both of my spare keys with the same results. Of course I was planning on leaving on a big trip tomorrow am. Help!
 

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GL1800 Doctor
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I just got back from 300 mile ride and was cleaning up my bike, I took the key out to open the side pocket on my 2010 and now I can't get the key all the way back into the ignition. It goes in about an inch, (so it's sticking out about a half inch farther than usual) then feels like it's bottoming out on solid steel. Messing around with it I did find if I stick it in just about a quarter inch I can turn the ignition either way which seems weird, but it's still not engaging to turn on the lights or be able to start it. Anyone have any Ideas? I tried both of my spare keys with the same results. Of course I was planning on leaving on a big trip tomorrow am. Help!
Sounds like one of the pins has fallen out of its hole. You may have to take the key switch to a locksmith to see if they can repair it. I had this happen on a car once, it was a whole bunch of fun getting the steering wheel apart to remove the key switch on it. The wing only has 2 screws that hold the key switch to the frame, but they are security headed screws and can be a real pain in the butt to get out as well.
 

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I had that happen on my 2012 one time and I finally put key in and turned it till the key would go the whole way in and it has worked since then.
Lyle
 

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Can't hurt to put a drop of oil in the key way hole.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys
A liberal dosage of WD-40 is what did the trick. I tried blowing it out too. First we were able to get the key off of the way in, but it wouldn't turn, then about ten minutes after spraying it I finally got it to free up. What a relief!
Thanks again!
 

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Thanks guys
A liberal dosage of WD-40 is what did the trick. I tried blowing it out too. First we were able to get the key off of the way in, but it wouldn't turn, then about ten minutes after spraying it I finally got it to free up. What a relief!
Thanks again!
WD40 is a SOLVENT, not a lubricant and is bad for lock cylinders. It will gum them up over time when it dries out and gets exposed to heat.

I'd highly reccomend you find some good quality LUBRICANT and put it into the lock cylinder before it freezes up on you. Liquid Wrench makes a good Dry Slide lubricant for this job.
 

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Ignition locks

WD40 is a SOLVENT, not a lubricant and is bad for lock cylinders. It will gum them up over time when it dries out and gets exposed to heat.

I'd highly reccomend you find some good quality LUBRICANT and put it into the lock cylinder before it freezes up on you. Liquid Wrench makes a good Dry Slide lubricant for this job.

I agree with what Fred just said I rekeyed locks for homes at Lowes for eleven years some of the worst locks were regularly sprayed with WD40 before bringing to us for rekeying..:thumbup:
 

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GL1800 Doctor
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WD40 is a SOLVENT, not a lubricant and is bad for lock cylinders. It will gum them up over time when it dries out and gets exposed to heat.

I'd highly reccomend you find some good quality LUBRICANT and put it into the lock cylinder before it freezes up on you. Liquid Wrench makes a good Dry Slide lubricant for this job.
Glad you got it loose and it wasn't a permanent malfunction of the lock, but I agree with Fred, WD40 will cause trouble in there. A PTFE, Teflon lock lube is best because the carrier chemicals dry up and leave the Teflon behind to lubricate without attracting dust and dirt and gumming up the mechanism. DuPont Lock Lube at Lowes is a good product of this type. This is even better than graphite, because it's easy to get too much graphite into a lock and cause it to not work correctly as well. Master Lock only recommends Teflon, no graphite or other "lubes".
 

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Long term, I agree with the above posts. Use a lubricant that is actually designed for lock lubricant, but WD40 did the job in this case and was probably as good a product as any to resolve the immediate issue. In fact, flushing out the lock with WD40 would probably be one of the first things I would have tried.
 

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Only one additional comment to add - when you get the chance after your trip, spray a contact cleaner type spray down into the lock hole to clean out as much as of the WD40 as you can, then spray the lubricant mentioned above down into it. You should have no issues for the rest of the time you have the bike.
 

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Fairy tales do seem to grow and grow. Lol!

The other day the locks on my trailer hitch would not work, a good liberal application of WD 40 and they work fine. Such as been my experience with WD 40 over the years.

WD-40 Facts and Myths - Coastal locksmith - 912-230-9044 | Coastal Locksmith - Brunswick, GA

I like to bust myths and have learned there are many on forums.

Some say it is made of fish oil, and some use it on sponges to catch fish. When you ask them how many fish they caught, well the fish were not biting today........Lol! Conclusion is but another fairy tale.
 

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Help

Sorry for this....I thought...."My Goldwing doesn't have a HELP key! :twisted:

I know, I know. It was bad
 

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Thanks guys
A liberal dosage of WD-40 is what did the trick. I tried blowing it out too. First we were able to get the key off of the way in, but it wouldn't turn, then about ten minutes after spraying it I finally got it to free up. What a relief!
Thanks again!
Absolutely...WD 40 isn't called "the locksmith's buddy" for nothing...cleans, unsticks locks. NEVER (I repeat...NEVER) use oil. That will dry out over time and gum up the works like crazy...(I am a former locksmith and WD40 in the keyhole was always the solution when a customer called me complaining her key wouldn't go into the lock (especially front doors exposed to road grime and salt)
 

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Thanks guys
A liberal dosage of WD-40 is what did the trick. I tried blowing it out too. First we were able to get the key off of the way in, but it wouldn't turn, then about ten minutes after spraying it I finally got it to free up. What a relief!
Thanks again!
I had the same problem 4 years ago. Was stuck at a restaurant 120 miles from home. Walked to an auto parts store and got some WD40. Fix it, haven't had a problem since
 

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Keyway Lubricant

As Fred sez, do not use WD 40 in your keyways, it leaves a sticky coating and attracks dirt. Locksmiths use a special lubricant for keyways. (I have some, but not at home, can't remember what I have) Some hardware stores sell it or the dry spray powder, or get some from the locksmithy. It is also a good idea on other vehicles to lubricate keyways a couple times a year. Squirt/Squirt or Puff/Puff. Also, it's a good idea not to have a "Big Gaggle" of keys hanging on the keyways, it will distort and apply side pressures to the keyway channels, like we see some key rings. I use just a single key in my vehicles. Lexie doesn't need a key.
Dave B. Denver
 

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As Fred sez, do not use WD 40 in your keyways, it leaves a sticky coating and attracks dirt. Locksmiths use a special lubricant for keyways. (I have some, but not at home, can't remember what I have) Some hardware stores sell it or the dry spray powder, or get some from the locksmithy. It is also a good idea on other vehicles to lubricate keyways a couple times a year. Squirt/Squirt or Puff/Puff. Also, it's a good idea not to have a "Big Gaggle" of keys hanging on the keyways, it will distort and apply side pressures to the keyway channels, like we see some key rings. I use just a single key in my vehicles. Lexie doesn't need a key.
Dave B. Denver
I'm sorry but I really have to take issue with this. WD40 IS the way to go. It is not a lubricant; it is a cleaner, and most of it evaporates off shortly after application, leaving the internal pins and parts clean. Brass on brass parts (which is the lock pins and cylinder)does NOT need lubrication of any sort to work perfectly. Brass on brass is self lubricating. It's grime that gets in there and seizes things up that is the problem. Oil or grease in the mechanism only makes things worse because it combines with dirt to form a gritty paste. Graphite is acceptable for locks, but only the finest kind made for that purpose, as well as some special purpose stuff available from locksmith supply houses. AND if you do add anything "powdered", you will have to clean the lock from time to time (but that's no big deal as it's something you should do twice a year anyway with WD40).

This is an ongoing discussion even at locksmith conventions that I attended for over 30 years. But most professional locksmiths do agree with using WD40 (I used it in the trade for 30 years with never a problem afterwards). That's why we call it "the locksmiths buddy".

Many people say WD40 is great to rub on arthritic joints but I won't go that far....probably eat your liver out!! But the makers of WD40 have hundreds of people willing to get up in public and attest to it's use for that purpose ????
 
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