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Discussion Starter #1
I am about to embark on my first longish trip towing my bushtec. I thought I'd give it the "manual" maintenance prior to hitting the road. While I am not planning on doing anything w/ the wheel bearings (one quick call to Bushtec and I learned they're "good for 100k" miles), I did want to make sure I know how to at least remove the wheel if I'm unlucky enough to have a flat.

So.... I've tried. I even got as far as unscrewing the 3 hex retaining screws before I gave up and called Bushtec. I was told, "The hub should just come off". Herein lies the rub...it does NOT come off. I have jiggled, pulled and twisted, but before I resort to anything more physical, I am here asking those that have gone before me:

How do I get the hub off????

I have a picture of said hub here, so the style is not in question.

Thank you!

Brett
 

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Make sure you have all the set screws removed/backed off. I think three is correct. But the cap is a very exact fit over the hub, and if you get it cocked a little, it will stick. Try taking a small hammer and tap all around the sides lightly. Try squirting a little lub or WD40 etc, in the back side, but as a last resort.

I would not try to pry them off, but you might give them a little nudge from behind if you can get something in there. Really, they should just come off once you get them moving. (note they do NOT screw on, as some have thought, they just slip fit with VERY tight tolerance.

As to any other maintenance, wipe down all the suspension parts, I use a cloth with some WD40 in it. Then use a light lithium or graphite lube on any parts that rub together. Like on the sway bars. Grease the swivel in front and you are about done. The wheel bearings are lifetime basically and sealed, but by removing the nut and pulling the wheel, you can feel them and wipe them down.

If you don't have the owners manual, get one. You might be able to download it from the company site. Don't use high pressure air in the shocks! Get a two stage bicycle pump from a good bike shop, and that is all you need. Make sure you have the pressure set right when towing it, loaded or empty. If you keep the wheels straight (no camber) the tires last a long time, but if you go with a lot of camber, they can wear out much quicker. Use just enough air in the shocks to keep the wheels 90 degrees to the plane of the ground. The tires are run flats, so a spare isn't really needed. Wheels and tires are somewhat expensive, but they do last a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks!

Thank you! I've lubed the swivel and have some dry lube for the sway bars. I'm headed out to do that now, as well as remove the hubs!

I have the manual and have played w/ the suspension and understand the system. Several years ago I put together a travel air pump that is just the 'guts' of a cheap 12v pump. I wired it to a cig plug and can just hook it up to my bike and it'll reach all wheels and the trailer. I think that should be a low-pressure way to adjust the suspension, no? :)

I do have a spare tube, so it sounds as if I can run a flat to a garage and have them handle it. Thanks again for the information and advice!

Brett
 

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I picked up a new one at Daytona Bike week and they told me the hub is difficult to remove. Can't remember what they said to remove it. I would give them a call.

Did you get it off?
 

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the hub can be a little tight coming off just make sure all three screws are backed off far enough, then use a rubber mallet to bump it and it should come off. you can get the owners manual from bushtec.com. I bought mine new last year and have 20,000 miles on it with no issues and the tires look new, no bearing issues either.
 

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Thank you! I've lubed the swivel and have some dry lube for the sway bars. I'm headed out to do that now, as well as remove the hubs!

I have the manual and have played w/ the suspension and understand the system. Several years ago I put together a travel air pump that is just the 'guts' of a cheap 12v pump. I wired it to a cig plug and can just hook it up to my bike and it'll reach all wheels and the trailer. I think that should be a low-pressure way to adjust the suspension, no? :)

I do have a spare tube, so it sounds as if I can run a flat to a garage and have them handle it. Thanks again for the information and advice!

Brett
Wouldn't recommend a powered pump for the air suspension. All you need is a small amount of air to bring the suspension up, and the pump can put out air a lot faster than you need. Only need about 45 psi or so. That cheapo pump will get up to around a 100 psi. Do make sure you roll the trailer back and forth after adding air to allow the suspension to resettle into the new position. You can use it, just be careful.

Regarding the hub cap - as was mentioned - tight clearance. If while trying to remove it gets cocked, it's a real bear to get off. Use a rubber mallet and smack the end of the cap as to try and seat it back fully onto the wheel. That starts you off level on the hub, and can also help break it loose from corrosion. Then start wiggling it back and forth to work it off. Do make sure the three allen screws are backed fully out (recommend just removing them). It's a drag to be banging the hub cap on/off and find out that the screw was only on by a thread or two and falls out into the great unknown. If necessary, you can gently pry on opposing sides to help walk it off.

Follow the manual regarding tightening the castle nut and checking the balance of the tire. I have some lead stick-on weights on mine, as well as an ounce of dyna beads.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wouldn't recommend a powered pump for the air suspension. All you need is a small amount of air to bring the suspension up, and the pump can put out air a lot faster than you need. Only need about 45 psi or so. That cheapo pump will get up to around a 100 psi. Do make sure you roll the trailer back and forth after adding air to allow the suspension to resettle into the new position. You can use it, just be careful.

Regarding the hub cap - as was mentioned - tight clearance. If while trying to remove it gets cocked, it's a real bear to get off. Use a rubber mallet and smack the end of the cap as to try and seat it back fully onto the wheel. That starts you off level on the hub, and can also help break it loose from corrosion. Then start wiggling it back and forth to work it off. Do make sure the three allen screws are backed fully out (recommend just removing them). It's a drag to be banging the hub cap on/off and find out that the screw was only on by a thread or two and falls out into the great unknown. If necessary, you can gently pry on opposing sides to help walk it off.

Follow the manual regarding tightening the castle nut and checking the balance of the tire. I have some lead stick-on weights on mine, as well as an ounce of dyna beads.
I got the hub off. With the wheel off the ground, I had room to get a 1 x 2 (about 18" long) from the inside to use a rubber mallet to tap the hub off. It IS snug! I'll be very careful w/ the suspension. I'll be buying a hand pump right away!
 

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:thumbup::thumbup: :yes::yes::yes:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sooooo nice!

Back from the trip! Over 700 miles towing the trailer, and honestly it's hard to even notice it's there. Just like others have said about these trailers. But how nice it was to stash the helmets, jackets and such....and have room for the beach chairs and chilled beverages! Guess I'm spoiled now. Oh, and it's very easy to scrape a peg whilst towing :shock:
 

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On my trip to Alaska, I had a flat on my Bushtec. I changed the tire and tube without removing the wheel at all. I just supported it on a block with the wheel off the ground, took the outside edge of the tire off the rim, pulled the tube out and then pulled off the tire. It was very easy and very quick. You don't need an extra wheel that way and the tire and tube are easier to take along on the trip! I think you'll be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is.
 

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On my trip to Alaska, I had a flat on my Bushtec. I changed the tire and tube without removing the wheel at all. I just supported it on a block with the wheel off the ground, took the outside edge of the tire off the rim, pulled the tube out and then pulled off the tire. It was very easy and very quick. You don't need an extra wheel that way and the tire and tube are easier to take along on the trip! I think you'll be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is.
....and getting the tire on and off will be made very much easier if you use some silicone spray. Always carry a can in your trailer. The tires are quite hard to change dry and extremely easy to change with some tire lube. The silicone spray works great.
 
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