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...Imperial, isn’t that Canadian or British ?
You're a bit behind the times! The UK started the transition to metrication in 1965. We started measuring in millimetres in the early 1970's.
Imperial is the old system upon which the US based much of its system.

Our old system was a mess, we had British whitworth threads, British Standard fine, British association threads, Brass threads, Cycle threads, Unified fine threads, Unified course threads, Square threads, Acme threads and I'm sure other obscure ones I've forgotten. Similarly with measurements, 1/32", 1/16", 1/8", 1/4" feet, yards, chains etc plus 1/10" 1/5" etc plus o.oo1* and multiples of. Now we just use mm from 0.01mm upwards. Simples...
 

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# 2 mechanic dummy here ( me ) ................. "Imperial" set ?? The things dummies ( me ) learn from this site...............................

my next musing...................... why in the world would ANYONE .... EVER ........ use a set like that on ANYTHING instead of just using 'normal' bolts ?? What is the purpose of using allen wrenches over 'normal' screws/bolts ? ( ones that use a screwdriver )
Allen head, more contact surface for the driver, more available torque without the likelihood of stripping the hole. Allen head also allows for a flush bolt vs a standard hex-head bolt.
 

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You're a bit behind the times! The UK started the transition to metrication in 1965. We started measuring in millimetres in the early 1970's.
Imperial is the old system upon which the US based much of its system.

Our old system was a mess, we had British whitworth threads, British Standard fine, British association threads, Brass threads, Cycle threads, Unified fine threads, Unified course threads, Square threads, Acme threads and I'm sure other obscure ones I've forgotten. Similarly with measurements, 1/32", 1/16", 1/8", 1/4" feet, yards, chains etc plus 1/10" 1/5" etc plus o.oo1* and multiples of. Now we just use mm from 0.01mm upwards. Simples...
Yet the UK still uses feet and inches when building and miles on the roadways. :rolleyes: Perfection is in the eye of the beholder.
 

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Yet the UK still uses feet and inches when building and miles on the roadways. :rolleyes: Perfection is in the eye of the beholder.
Not strictly so but you're right that we reverted to using miles for road distances, why, I've no idea. But the building industry has long been metricated. I've a little book that was released by a government department in 1972 to aid the transition to metric units, it's primarily aimed at the building and engineering sectors. Interestingly, the UK did not adopt the centimetre as Europe had, we use millimetres and metres. Unfortunately, the public and the teaching establishments made presumptions prior to the change and so it's now got so there's a bit of mismash where much of Jo public uses cm and the serious industries don't. Also, there is plenty of luggards who have never got near being metricated, they work in feet and inches and when they go to purchase stuff the staff convert to the nearest metric units. Products and produce is no longer allowed to be marked for sale in Imperial units so as the oldies die out the youngsters will complete the transition.

There was no intention to imply perfection, just info. :)
 

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Nov. 10, 1999: Metric Math Mistake Muffed Mars Meteorology Mission
 

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Nov. 10, 1999: Metric Math Mistake Muffed Mars Meteorology Mission
Yes, a bit unfortunate, that. It's interesting that NASA doesn't seem to know whether the orbiter crashed or has gone off into space! Surely someone recalculated and worked that one out...
 

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Not strictly so but you're right that we reverted to using miles for road distances, why, I've no idea. But the building industry has long been metricated. I've a little book that was released by a government department in 1972 to aid the transition to metric units, it's primarily aimed at the building and engineering sectors. Interestingly, the UK did not adopt the centimetre as Europe had, we use millimetres and metres. Unfortunately, the public and the teaching establishments made presumptions prior to the change and so it's now got so there's a bit of mismash where much of Jo public uses cm and the serious industries don't. Also, there is plenty of luggards who have never got near being metricated, they work in feet and inches and when they go to purchase stuff the staff convert to the nearest metric units. Products and produce is no longer allowed to be marked for sale in Imperial units so as the oldies die out the youngsters will complete the transition.

There was no intention to imply perfection, just info. :)
Interesting, I was in Birmingham a couple years ago and overheard a carpenter yelling down to helper that the awning was a yard and six inches wide. May be it was a metric yard? :unsure:
 

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I'm trying to remove some (previous owner) Kuryakyn highway boards to facilitate spark plug replacement. Trouble is, the hex head bolts on the underside are not fitting the hex drivers I have. 5mm is too big and 4mm is too small. How is that even possible? There is not an Imperial version of hex heads and even if so, Kuryakyn isn't dumb enough to use them on a metric bike, surely?

Maybe the hex head sockets have been deformed is all I can think of. Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance,

W
Well, as stated, Kuryakyn parts are not metric... they are SAE. SAE hex heads do exist, I have a set from Amazon that is both metric and SAE hex heads in one box, a nice set. Other aftermarket parts can be SAE. Speedbleeders are SAE, not metric.
 

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......my next musing...................... why in the world would ANYONE .... EVER ........ use a set like that on ANYTHING instead of just using 'normal' bolts ?? What is the purpose of using allen wrenches over 'normal' screws/bolts ? ( ones that use a screwdriver )
The answer is packaging efficiency. External drive headed bolts require additional area around the heads for wrenching. Internal drive fasteners do not. It’s very common to use hex screws in products where real-estate is a premium.... electronic circuit cards are a good example.
 

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You can easily find the standard SAE conversion to metric and vise versa if you remember that 25.4mm = 1 inch. 3/4 inch = .75 X 25.4 = 19.05 mm. and 3/16 inch = .1875" = ( .1875 X 25.4mm) = 4.7mm

4.5 mm conversion to standard SAE is: 4.5 / 25.4 = .177 inches.
11mm to standard SAE is: 11 / 25.4 = .433 inches approximately 7/16 which is .4375
 
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