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I don’t mean to stir the pot, but I’m truly curious, does anyone know what, if any, qualifications Honda Corp. requires dealer techs to achieve and maintain? I anticipate no serious issues with my DCT, but given my recent negative dealer experiences, I’m genuinely concerned about Honda’s ability to handle a serious warranty issue should one arise. I’m not talking about voluntary training, I’m talking about minimum tech qualifications to work on a Goldwing. It seems to me there’s enough technology on these things to require some training.
 

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Good question! I was told last year where I purchased mine that they had the only certified tech in the state at the time.
Any other dealers that had a serious problem with the new 'Wing had to call them. This was relayed by the store mgr, not a sales person. But I still took that with a grain of salt.
 

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I don’t mean to stir the pot, but I’m truly curious, does anyone know what, if any, qualifications Honda Corp. requires dealer techs to achieve and maintain?
Probably none. When I worked for car dealers on the automotive side, no such "corporate" requirements were required, at least back then. Often manufactures offer corporate training, but for many shops it comes with huge problems. First, the dealer looses out on labor dollars while the tech is gone. Rarely are those classes local, so the dealer has to bear the cost of transportation, room and board, to send a tech off for training. There can also be training class fees. Since most shops cannot afford to send everyone, sending 1 or 2 techs can foster jealousy within the shop. Another disadvantage is that a dealer might spend all that money to train one tech, to bring back knowledge for the others, only to have him quit and go to another shop ... after all, good techs are hard to find.

I've never worked for Honda on their power sports side, but it is my understanding that to be Honda certified tech, one must go to one of their approved technical schools for basic mechanic classes, and then to become Honda certified, they then learn all Honda stuff from generators, to marine motors, to side-by-sides, to GoldWings ... etc. I believe their trailing even includes writing work-orders using various software packages, filling out warranty claims, and probably inventory control for parts. Once one graduates, and if he goes to work for Honda, he's only certified to something like 80%. From there his on-the-job experience starts counting towards being 100% certified. There is such a thing as being GoldWing certified. That would require many hours or GoldWing work.

However GoldWing certified techs are far and few between. After all, most don't like working on them. I had a customer who had his ghost shifting 5th gen repaired under warranty at a dealer here in Florida. He left with a fixed transmission only to find out that his engine then used oil. I'm not sure why he was not able to return the repairing dealer, but Honda of America told him that if he wanted his oil burning issue resolved under warranty, he would have to find a GoldWing certified tech. Honda offered no assistance in helping him find one. He called every dealer in this state, Florida, and for the longest time was out of luck.

But at WingDing, he happened to run into one. The tech was nice enough to write him a letter stating if the rings are not installed correctly, he'd end up with an oil burner. Honda accepted the letter, and I think he then returned to the repairing dealer.

Poor Matt, he then left with an oil leak that no Honda dealer would touch ... or even look at. To fix his oil leak, I replaced his water pump's o-ring in June 2011. Apparently when the tech fixed the oil-burning, the water pump's o-ring was slightly nicked when when the water pump was being re-installed.

BIG TAKE AWAY HERE ... never reuse o-rings. They loose their resilience and will damage easier when being reused.
 

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The Florida dealership I frequent sent a tech out to Honda's school to be certified on the 2018 Goldwing. The dealership owner is so cheap I can't imagine he did it out of the goodness of his heart but they sell and service a lot of Goldwings.
 

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Really what's there to being certified, I think all that is needed is for the shop Tech to have access to a Honda Diagnostic Software tool and have access to the 2018/2019 service manual info...
 

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Does the dealer sell Wings?
If yes, do they sell a bunch?
Does it look like other Wingers bring their bikes there?
If yes, then chances are good they have the experience to work on them.


I had a dealer here that didn't sell enough wings to really sell them, another dealer 50 minutes away had all the business. They did, however, had a wrench that knew wings and when I went there, they knew that only that wrench was to touch my bike. When he moved on, so did I.
 

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Most customers are not willing to pay what is required for experienced, trained, and certified technicians.
 

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Most customers are not willing to pay what is required for experienced, trained, and certified technicians.
Neither do the dealers! It is rare that a manufacturer will: contractually, by state law or due to any concept of ethics require technical training in order to obtain and sell any particular vehicle. Even then, the attendance by a living being is often enough to satisfy whatever hurdle must be met.
 

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In the DFW area I think the only qualification required is to at least have a 4th grade education and to be taller than the line they've drawn on the wall.
Why be disrespectful to technicians? It's wrong.

Beagle
 

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LOL.....no it didn't. That's why I made the comment.
But if there is a brilliant uplifting meaning to your comment other than snide attempt at humor please enlighten us.

Beagle
 

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Why be disrespectful to technicians? It's wrong.

Beagle
When I was in the Air Force I worked on F-16's when they were new. One of the Air Forces stipulations was that the tech data be written so someone who read at 6th grade level could understand it. Take it with a rain of salt.
 

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I know for a fact on the Honda car and bike side there are techs that carry very high level certs from Honda that 100% go to school and pay for the training themselves through Honda. And to get the training they have had to graduate from a two year tech school to be eligible for the training. Dealers will pay for updates and such. These techs are looked for and those techs go through a completely different hiring process than new or just out of school techs. It takes years to amass the training to become the Master Techs. I know one Master tech in both cars and bikes. He retired from the dealer game and opened his own private shop in Texas. Very exclusive customers. My motorcycle dealer had a Honda and Harley master tech. He finally got fed up with dealer life took his dyno and went to work for Honda Corporate in there motorcycle racing program.

The Master Techs are out there and they get paid very well and are in very high demand in growing markets.

I have a cousin that is a Porsche and Chrysler Master Tech. He was a dealer tech for 30 years. He's now retired from dealer life and builds and works on custom Porsche's and Mopars now. If a dealer even wants to talk with him now. They pay him or there is no consult. He still goes to the factory schools for both makes to keep his cert's active.
 

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Most technicians don’t repair these days, they replace. If you have an issue and the service manual/computer links it to “X” part, they just replace it. Long gone are the days of doing machine work to parts to fix them or rebuilding components to make them work again. Much cheaper and faster to just throw parts at it until the issue is resolved. The only training they need is how to use the provided equipment to diagnose an issue for a specific vehicle and how to get access to the part and replace it.
 

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I live ten minutes from a GW dealer, I took it there for a brake recall, then I fixed all the detail work they messed up after I picked up my ride, like re-tighten loose fasteners, adjust foot brake, etc. I'm fortunate to live not more than an hour's run from Greg's shop, JustWings, I have a GW problem, I go there and leave feeling god and confident in his work. When he's finished with his fix, he will sit with you, explain it all in detail, show the defective parts he replaced and do a show and tell. Just a plug for Greg, please know that I have no financial interest or other interest in his shop, and no, we are not kin folks.
 
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