GL1800Riders Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of MAY's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Possibly from the road heat, but today my back rim was too hot to hold onto at a gas station. Yes it was 98 degrees out and I had been riding on asphault for 4 hrs. Can the road put off that much heat? The tire was hot, but I could hold onto it. the front tire was hot also but the rim was ambient temp.

any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,624 Posts
Yep they get hot.

Run the big slab in South Carolina when it is 98 to 107 and even the front tire will be sticky to the touch.

They get hot. And the rear rim and tire is trapped up under the saddlebags and keeps the road heat somewhat confined.

Anything over 125 degrees feels hot to the touch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I saw 138 degrees on the GYTT last week, riding the slab in 100 degree temps. I didn't try touching it but I bet it would have been to hot to touch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,341 Posts
Wing rear rims get plenty hot. Make sure the rear tire is properly inflated when cold. You may actually need to add a few pounds for the increase in air temp. It will still be a very warm rim though.

Enjoy your trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,161 Posts
Don't forget you have two chrome heaters back there too!:thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,161 Posts
I would think the tire would get hotter from the "Chrome heaters" before the wheel did. :shrug:
Very true. It's still another source of extra heat!:thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,341 Posts
:confused:

If the wheel is getting hotter then the tire, I see that as a problem.
I would think the tire would get hotter from the "Chrome heaters" before the wheel did. :shrug:
It could be, BUT,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

How many have ever gone to the touble of actually feeling a rear rim on a hot bike? Hot mufflers, pavement, people, etc. It is something one must really set out to do. The only reason I have any experience with it is a tire change. The rim was pretty warm, the tire and the chrome heaters were cooled off. I took off the rear tire, so checking out things wasn't difficult. I also brought it up to a trusted wrench and he also confirmed that the wheels get pretty warm. He has been known to change a tire or two in a days time. LOL

Check it out. Don't burn yourself though. Have a great 4th.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
hot rim

May I suggest that a metal rim and a

rubber tire at the exact same tempture

will "feel" different to the touch.

A Radio Shack IR thermo for about $15.00.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,872 Posts
IR is good, but only as a guide

May I suggest that a metal rim and a

rubber tire at the exact same tempture

will "feel" different to the touch.

A Radio Shack IR thermo for about $15.00.
Good idea and a good comment. The aluminum wheel will feel hotter to the touch then the rubber tire due to difference in heat conductance properties, even if both are actually the same temp. Similar to walking on the rug in your house versus the tile floor. Both are the same actual temp, but one conducts heat better than the other.

Regarding the IR thermometer, be aware of the different emissivity levels of aluminum vs. tire rubber. Big difference between the two.

Emissivity in the Infrared
Emissivity Table
Emissivity is a measure of a material’s radiating efficiency. An emissivity of 1.00 implies that the material is 100% efficient at radiating energy. An emissivity of 0.20 implies that the material radiates only 20% of that which it is capable of radiating.

Tables of emissivity values are only approximated values for real materials. A range of emissivity values is usually given for many materials whose emissivity can be affected by surface roughness or finish. Additionally, thin sheets of material such as plastics may be semi-transparent in the infrared and therefore have reduced emissivity.

To optimize the surface temperature measurement of a material:
  • Avoid reflections by shielding the material from surrounding high temperature objects.
  • For semi-transparent materials such as plastic film, assure that the background is uniform and lower in temperature than the material.
  • Conduct the measurement perpendicular to the material’s surface whenever the emissivity is less than approximately 0.90. In all cases, do not exceed angles greater than 30 degrees from perpendicular.
Note: Applicable for material temperatures from 0 to 250°C
Aluminum

Polished
0.10 – 0.05

Oxidized
0.10 – 0.40

Rough
0.10 – 0.30

Anodized
0.60 – 0.95

Rubber

Hard glossy
0.95

Soft rough
0.85

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
When running a MC tire at 85 mph on a 105 degree day I have seen my rear tire temp as high as 158 degrees on my TPMS. With my non runflat CT it is usually the same temp as the front or a little lower than the front tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,115 Posts
In addition to what the others have stated, the final drive may also contribute to the heating of the rim. I suspect the rim acts as a bit of a heat sink for the FD.

Possibly from the road heat, but today my back rim was too hot to hold onto at a gas station. Yes it was 98 degrees out and I had been riding on asphault for 4 hrs. Can the road put off that much heat? The tire was hot, but I could hold onto it. the front tire was hot also but the rim was ambient temp.

any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
ok thanks. It all makes alot of sense. Some of you are pretty smart.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top