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I am looking to upgrade. How does Traxxion compare to Racetech on a full front and rear. I also want to include the triple tree swap.
 

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If you're wanting to compare Traxxion springs to the Racetech springs, they're comparable. Apples to Apples.

If you're wanting to compare Traxxion AK-20 cartridges to Racetech springs, there is no comparison. Racetech doesn't have anything like that. Apples to Oranges.

Same with the triple tree. Racetech doesn't offer anything like the triple tree set that Traxxion offers.

If you want a good improvement in handling and a fairly low price, then a new set of Racetech, Traxxion or Progressive springs are a great way to spend your money.

If you want a GREAT improvement in handling, then the ultimate is the Traxxion setup with the AK-20's, All Balls steering head bearings, triple tree (upper and lower), fork brace and rear shock with the appropriate spring.
 

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Keith,

Bartman forgot to mention the RaceTech Gold Valves/emulators.

Simply put, those devices are RaceTech's attempt at making the stock Honda internal fork components actually work properly and provide some decent compression and rebound damping. I think they've done a pretty good job of that. Read the tech article on RaceTech's site for yourself to see the engineering involved and the resultant improvement in damping. I'm and ME, and the engineering principles seem sound to me.

RaceTech springs and Gold Valves can be had for a few hundred dollars. Traxxion cartridges and springs will set you back a couple of thousand, but they are certainly the superior solution.

Which do you need? Only your riding style and your wallet can answer that question.

***
 

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If you're wanting to compare Traxxion springs to the Racetech springs, they're comparable. Apples to Apples.

If you're wanting to compare Traxxion AK-20 cartridges to Racetech springs, there is no comparison. Racetech doesn't have anything like that.
Sure they do. Racetech also sells a $250 package to improve the damping curve. New Gold Valves for the cartridge side, a cartridge emulator for the damping rod side.

Is it as good as Traxxions dual new cartridge innards, which are roughly $1000? No. Is it significantly cheaper? Yes. Is Traxxion damping worth the extra money? Send me detailed telemetry from your rides through the twisties on your favorite roads, and your last three years income tax returns, and I'll hazard a guess. :)

A difference is that Traxxion is a complete package, put together by professionals to work well together. Racetech, even if you get the damping installed by a pro, is more a DIY deal, where people often add a fork brace and/or steering bearings and/or triple tree. Maybe Traxxions and All Balls.

The flip side of that is that, for suspension nerds, Racetech offers some intriguing possibilities to craft a unique package to meet your specific needs. Traxxion is more a case of just handing your bike over for the package.

If you're experienced in suspension work, and want to DIY, Racetech seems to me to be an appealing choice, on a cost/benefit basis. If you just want to hand the bike over to someone to git er done, and are willing to pay the freight, Traxxion seems a more obvious choice. If you want the best, and hang the cost, Traxxion.

The Traxxion package has been installed by more people on this forum, but the Racetech guys, like me, are a significant group. People in both groups seem to be happy with their choice.
 

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Race Tech will give your front end a slight hop hop hop that Traxxion won't.

The RT rear shock and Traxxion rear shock are comperable in price.

If a couple of grand isn't a big deal to you, go Traxxion.

If it is, go Race Tech.

RT is a patch, Traxxion is the cure.
 

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Sure they do. Racetech also sells a $250 package to improve the damping curve. New Gold Valves for the cartridge side, a cartridge emulator for the damping rod side.

Is it as good as Traxxions dual new cartridge innards, which are roughly $1000? No. Is it significantly cheaper? Yes. Is Traxxion damping worth the extra money? Send me detailed telemetry from your rides through the twisties, and your last three years income tax returns, and I'll hazard a guess. :)

A difference is that Traxxion is a complete package, put together by professionals to work well together. Racetech, even if you get the damping installed by a pro, is more a DIY deal, where people often add a fork brace and/or steering bearings and/or triple tree. Maybe Traxxions and All Balls.

The flip side of that is that, for suspension nerds, Racetech offers some intriguing possibilities to craft a unique package to meet your specific needs. Traxxion is more a case of just handing your bike over for the package.

If you're experienced in suspension work, and want to DIY, Racetech seems to me to be an appealing choice, on a cost/benefit basis. If you just want to hand the bike over to someone to git er done, and are willing to pay the freight, Traxxion seems a more obvious choice. If you want the best, and hang the cost, Traxxion.

The Traxxion package has been installed by more people on this forum, but the Racetech guys, like me, are a significant group. People in both groups seem to be happy with their choice.
:agree:100% and I have 2,500 more bucks to spend on gas. The Racetech setup works just fine and is no bandaid they have ben in business for a very long time and know what they are doing :thumbup:
 

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Race Tech and really pleased with it
 

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If you're wanting to compare Traxxion springs to the Racetech springs, they're comparable. Apples to Apples.

If you're wanting to compare Traxxion AK-20 cartridges to Racetech springs, there is no comparison. Racetech doesn't have anything like that. Apples to Oranges.

Same with the triple tree. Racetech doesn't offer anything like the triple tree set that Traxxion offers.

If you want a good improvement in handling and a fairly low price, then a new set of Racetech, Traxxion or Progressive springs are a great way to spend your money.

If you want a GREAT improvement in handling, then the ultimate is the Traxxion setup with the AK-20's, All Balls steering head bearings, triple tree (upper and lower), fork brace and rear shock with the appropriate spring.
I could not say it better:thumbup:
 

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If you're wanting to compare Traxxion springs to the Racetech springs, they're comparable. Apples to Apples.

If you're wanting to compare Traxxion AK-20 cartridges to Racetech springs, there is no comparison. Racetech doesn't have anything like that. Apples to Oranges.

Same with the triple tree. Racetech doesn't offer anything like the triple tree set that Traxxion offers.

If you want a good improvement in handling and a fairly low price, then a new set of Racetech, Traxxion or Progressive springs are a great way to spend your money.

If you want a GREAT improvement in handling, then the ultimate is the Traxxion setup with the AK-20's, All Balls steering head bearings, triple tree (upper and lower), fork brace and rear shock with the appropriate spring.
:agree:I had new bushings, seals, oil, disabled ADV and new traxxion springs installed for under 500 bucks at Midwest. Smiled all the way home for 600 miles. What a huge improvement. Big bang for my buck.:thumbup:

Fred
 

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Compare..

I've ridden a "full-monty" traxxionized bike...not that far and not that aggressively, but far enough to get a feel that it wasn't worth $2,500 to me (yea, I could afford it, but couldn't justify it). Maybe part of the reason is my 2006 already has 80,000+ miles on it - which isn't all that much, but it's a factor.

Something needed to be done though. I went with RaceTech Gold valves, springs, and since I was in there I did the All Balls. Did the work myself (which you can't do if you want Traxxion - BS in my book). I'm going to do something with the rear spring sometime this winter. I'll look at all the options out there again when I do.

For now, I'm very pleased with the new front end and I'm very pleased to have the extra money saved to go towards other things.
 

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Did the work myself (which you can't do if you want Traxxion - BS in my book).

Actually, the only thing that Traxxion requires an authorized installer to do is the AK-20 installation. The left fork tube needs to be modified, and while it is a simple, no-brainer operation, they have chosen to limit their liability by training the people who do the install to do it right, and do it their way. This adds $150 to your do-it-yourself price, but is well worth having it done right. And we have the equipment to do things such as polish the fork tubes, which you are unlikely to have. (the fixtures we custom made for us by a local machinist)
You are welcome to send the forks to Traxxion, or bring them to an authorized (trained) installer, and do the rest yourself. If you want to bring them to us, we even have some extra specialty tools we'll loan you to make the job easier. In fact, not buying the specialty tools will probably save you enough to cover the install charge. And believe me, the job is hours easier if you have the right tools. (and most of these tools are one-time-use tools, that you will probably never need again.) We normally rebuild the forks, service the preload adjustor and swap the shock over for the customer. But we can loan you a stem socket, and the race remover and drivers if you like. (and are local)

=Dave=
GWBBA #9
rocketmoto.com
 

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Sure they do. Racetech also sells a $250 package to improve the damping curve. New Gold Valves for the cartridge side, a cartridge emulator for the damping rod side.

Is it as good as Traxxions dual new cartridge innards, which are roughly $1000? No. Is it significantly cheaper? Yes. Is Traxxion damping worth the extra money? Send me detailed telemetry from your rides through the twisties on your favorite roads, and your last three years income tax returns, and I'll hazard a guess. :)

A difference is that Traxxion is a complete package, put together by professionals to work well together. Racetech, even if you get the damping installed by a pro, is more a DIY deal, where people often add a fork brace and/or steering bearings and/or triple tree. Maybe Traxxions and All Balls.

The flip side of that is that, for suspension nerds, Racetech offers some intriguing possibilities to craft a unique package to meet your specific needs. Traxxion is more a case of just handing your bike over for the package.

If you're experienced in suspension work, and want to DIY, Racetech seems to me to be an appealing choice, on a cost/benefit basis. If you just want to hand the bike over to someone to git er done, and are willing to pay the freight, Traxxion seems a more obvious choice. If you want the best, and hang the cost, Traxxion.

The Traxxion package has been installed by more people on this forum, but the Racetech guys, like me, are a significant group. People in both groups seem to be happy with their choice.
I agree completely.
I like to experiment and do my own work. That is why I went with the RaceTech. I am completely satisfied with the results.

Jeff..
 

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Actually, the only thing that Traxxion requires an authorized installer to do is the AK-20 installation. The left fork tube needs to be modified, and while it is a simple, no-brainer operation, they have chosen to limit their liability by training the people who do the install to do it right, and do it their way. This adds $150 to your do-it-yourself price, but is well worth having it done right. And we have the equipment to do things such as polish the fork tubes, which you are unlikely to have. (the fixtures we custom made for us by a local machinist)
You are welcome to send the forks to Traxxion, or bring them to an authorized (trained) installer, and do the rest yourself. If you want to bring them to us, we even have some extra specialty tools we'll loan you to make the job easier. In fact, not buying the specialty tools will probably save you enough to cover the install charge. And believe me, the job is hours easier if you have the right tools. (and most of these tools are one-time-use tools, that you will probably never need again.) We normally rebuild the forks, service the preload adjustor and swap the shock over for the customer. But we can loan you a stem socket, and the race remover and drivers if you like. (and are local)

=Dave=
GWBBA #9
rocketmoto.com
Thanks Dave, but me bringing my bike to you or the authorized installer in GA requires me to take time off of work. I would mention the miles, but that's more of a plus in my book.

The liability thing is a crap excuse. Many manufacturers sell parts that people could screw up and cause injuries to themselves. Maybe brake pad manufacturers should stop selling to the public.

The only tool I bought was the stem-steering socket. I'm sure if I wanted to I could post it for sale on the forum board for $10.00 less than I paid and it would get sold pretty quick. The same with the other tools if I bought them.

The bottom-line is Traxxion wants to keep their network of 'trained' installers in business - which I'm happy for you. I'm glad there's an alternative for those of us that don't live near one of you guys.
 

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The triple clamps are a huge before and after change. Even if was going Racetech I would get the Traxxion clamps. If you have it apart, you will be stunned by the change. On bumpy corners at speed it is truly remarkable...even though I already had the Full monty with Traxxion fork brace.
 

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Did the work myself (which you can't do if you want Traxxion - BS in my book).
I don't guess I've read your book. As far as your bike having 80k on it, many folks keep their Traxxion gear when trading up on a later model Wing. I know Honda dealerships that swap the Traxxion stuff from a trade-in to a new bike for their customers routinely. Not that big of a deal.

Not to diminish the level or quality of the service provided by Traxxion's installers or try to knock them out of work, I have purchased four Full Montys from Traxxion and have installed three of them myself. The 4th box of goodies is still sitting in my shop by the bike waiting to be installed when I get the time. When I do install the 4th set-up, I plan to document it in the How To, Step-by-Step board. Traxxion does provide a Tech Unit/procedures on how to do every step but I think I can improve on it with more photographs and really elaborating on the sections that need clarifications in laymen's terms.

2010 Level III



That's the big Traxxion mod...remove a aluminum bushing.


After facing the end off to release the bushing, I break the outside corner to ease assembly.


Only .064" faced off to set the aluminum bushing free.




2010 Level III


2003...first Full Monty (pre-billet trees edition)


Home-made bearing race seater.


Pressing bearing on frozen lower tree (pre-billet trees)


Cartridge priming rod and spring compressing rig.




Speaking of brake pads...




Granted, Traxxion does not have the time nor staff to walk you (along with all their other customers) through the install over the phone if you don't know what you are doing. In the scheme of things, its just basic, simple wrenching, one minor modification and a bleeding procedure on the rear spring pre-load pump/slave cylinder. The one modification to make is to the left fork leg and I could do it with a file if I were so inclined. In my eyes, the most critical part is the cleanliness of the components during assembly.

I'm not trying to sell Traxxion's gear for them but for some folks, handy with a wrench and no where near an authorized installer, it's a good option. If someone were to see exactly how to do it, it may help them make the decision on whether or not to tackle it themselves. On my first Full Monty, I planned on doing my own subsequent service work anyway so I figured I may as well know what I'm dealing with from the start, therefore, I purchased the install tools from Traxxion. In my case, I don't want anyone touching my bikes unless it is a warranty issue covered by Honda. It's not that I don't trust Traxxion but I just want to know what I'm dealing with. Besides, wrenching on bikes is my other hobby.

On recent Wing purchases, I just consider the Full Monty in with the price of the bike and therefore, upgrade the suspension while all the OEM parts are still fresh. You would be surprised how quickly an install goes on a new bike especially when the Traxxion triple tree is installed with the bearing already pressed on. Honda deserves some credit for having a front-end that is easy to work on and neck bearing races that are a breeze to remove unlike other bikes I've worked on over the years.

And I've not missed one hour of work to have the best suspension I can have on a Wing...and I'm just a dumba$$ shade-tree, DIY mechanic. However, I do have a camera and am not afraid to use it.

Z
 

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Cool, thanks, would love to see a video of a Traxion install.
 

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I don't guess I've read your book. As far as your bike having 80k on it, many folks keep their Traxxion gear when trading up on a later model Wing. I know Honda dealerships that swap the Traxxion stuff from a trade-in to a new bike for their customers routinely. Not that big of a deal.
Z
That's just my personal choice...I seem to get an itch for a new(er) bike after a few years. Not saying it will happen with this bike, but from what I've seen on this board, you don't get back much of your money when you sell a traxxionized bike vs stock or other upgrade.

Seems like after I do a major upgrade (car or bike), something catches my eye.
 

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You have a BIG GASH on your leg....

Band-Aid or Stitches??

Up to you.
They're all band aids. None replaces the fork tube or the axle or the bearing system, which has play, or decreases unsprung weight, additional problems with the Honda forks. Using slightly overtorqued tapered rolling bearings as a steering damper, instead of installing the $595 steering damper from Seeley, is most definitely a band aid.

The return per dollar goes down as the amount of money spent goes up. The big changes are better springs, new bearings and oil, adjusting steering head bearings, and making sure everything is working properly. Maybe a new front tire. A large chunk of the satisfaction with any front suspension modification comes from those. Modifications beyond that can make things even better, but the results per dollar decrease. The $1000 Traxxion damping system is not as far ahead of the $250 Racetech damping system, as the Racetech is over stock. Using the steering bearing as a damper works, although not as well as the Seeley would. I'm a little surprised Traxxion doesn't offer the Seeley as an option.

The damping package is the real difference between them, the other modifications which are part of the standard full-monty or mega-monty Traxxion installation can also be added to Racetech. The difference is that you have control, which some people want, while others want someone else to put the package together.

Traxxion is the best, and requires the least thought, but expensive. A less expensive approach is right for many people, depending on their needs, budget, and knowledge.
 

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