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I need to replace the rear tire on my bike.

I have the 70 series Dunlop E3 on there now and the shop I usually go to says due to "regulations", they will not install that tire on the bike, only a stock size tire.

I am thinking of taking the wheel off and taking it down there and having them just "install a tire on a rim".

I have a trailer hitch, how high do I jack the bike up or whatever to get the tire out the bottom without the bike falling over.

I do have a Craftsman ATV jack that I have used for my Harley Ultra Classic to raise it up a little, but never jacked it up real high, or used it on the Goldwing.


Any suggestions?
 

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Search the "lay over method" of changing the rear. Tons of threads on it and super easy to do.

Some are scared of it but noone has ever had any damage occur from doing it that we can find.
 

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Here's a video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUcGe-EcBy8

By the way...ignore most of the youtube comments. I guarantee you all the guys saying that he scratched the bike are wrong. I've done this personally 4 times and there are no scratches on the bike at all.

Way safer than jacking the bike up 2 feet in the air to get the rear tire out.

Here's proof... This is a 2012 that we laid over in a Pep Boys parking lot to have them throw a car tire on so we didn't get stuck in the middle of nowhere for 2 days waiting for a MC shop to be open.
20130511_203459_small.jpg
 

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I too was leery of laying the bike on its side and changing the tire but I decided to go for it. I went home from work on Monday, took off the highway peg, laid down some rags under the crash bars and put it down on it's side. I pulled off the wheel and took it down to my favorite bike shop and had the tire put on and yes I put on the same Bridgestone 704 that came on it as I like it so far. I came home and put on the wheel, torqued the lug nuts and then stood it back up. It was on it's side for around 1 hour or more and no ill effects. It is very easy to do and I would much rather do this than have a 900lb bike teetering up on some little jack.
 

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When I removed mine I jacked it up high enough to get a milk crate under it. That tire is heavy when trying to put it back on. I also did the lay down method which I think is allot easier except when picking the bike back up.
 

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I don't recommend a full tank when using the lay down method. It reduces your idiot tax.
This is true, I forgot to mention that I siphoned out 3 gallons of gas just to be safe. :thumbup:
 

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I too was leery of laying the bike on its side and changing the tire but I decided to go for it. I went home from work on Monday, took off the highway peg, laid down some rags under the crash bars and put it down on it's side. I pulled off the wheel and took it down to my favorite bike shop and had the tire put on and yes I put on the same Bridgestone 704 that came on it as I like it so far. I came home and put on the wheel, torqued the lug nuts and then stood it back up. It was on it's side for around 1 hour or more and no ill effects. It is very easy to do and I would much rather do this than have a 900lb bike teetering up on some little jack.
It takes all of 7 minutes to lay it over, remove old wheel, install new wheel(I have a spare). I have a Craftsmen jack, but have never used it. The thought of the damage if the bike falls off of that jack makes me cringe. BTW, the 70 series tire means you would have to have the bike up about one more inch than with a 60 series tire.
 

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I have no issue with folks who choose to lay their bikes down to change a tire (or for any other reason) but it isn't what I would do. You don't need to jack your bike up any more than an inch off of the center stand to get a 70 series tire off. If you are worried about the bike being unstable, then lower it back onto the center stand with the jack still engaged to support the rear. Then, take your tire and wheel to another dealer and have the folks there mount any tire you wish.
 

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Its not hard to remove the fender and slide the tire out the back. But I have a 2010 which complicates things.

I don't know what year that Honda starting putting the amplifier in back of the wheel, but it is there on the 2010. What is recommended in the owner's manual is to place the bike on the center stand, remove the rear fender and then remove the amplifier. This requires removing the seat and disconnecting the amplifier. This is not a lot of fun, but I suspect with a helper holding the amplifier out of the way it is possible to avoid removing the seat and disconnecting the amp.

Why couldn't Honda locate a disconnect on top of the amplifier?! :evil:
 

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Its not hard to remove the fender and slide the tire out the back. But I have a 2010 which complicates things.

I don't know what year that Honda starting putting the amplifier in back of the wheel, but it is there on the 2010. What is recommended in the owner's manual is to place the bike on the center stand, remove the rear fender and then remove the amplifier. This requires removing the seat and disconnecting the amplifier. This is not a lot of fun, but I suspect with a helper holding the amplifier out of the way it is possible to avoid removing the seat and disconnecting the amp.

Why couldn't Honda locate a disconnect on top of the amplifier?! :evil:
The OP has a trailer hitch. You have to remove it to go out the back and that's a lot of work. You have to jack it up higher to get the wheel out too. Unless you've got a table lift with a drop hitch, the layover method is by far the easiest for bikes with a hitch IMO.
 

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Not if it's a bushtec
 

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Just laid mine over tonight. Had a 1/4 tank of gas. Fairly easy to loosen and tighten the lug nuts while sitting on the garage floor. Took an hour to have the new ct installed at the dealer. Came home took 10 min to mount the wheel to the bike. Let it sit for 5 min, started right up and runs fine.
 

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After seeing the videos on here I tried the layover method with my 2012 in my garage.. wanted to see how difficult it is under controlled situation.. in case needed it on my crazy solo trips.. I am only 5'08" I did it solo from start to finish,, it is easy
 

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Lay it over. Done it several times. Easy-peasy. Gas in tank is no worry whatsoever.
 

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Lay bike down to change tire

Lay it over. Done it several times. Easy-peasy. Gas in tank is no worry whatsoever.
I've laid mine over with my gas tank 3/4 full and did not lose any. The only problem I've had is getting the right angle on the bike to get it back up. If I try to lift it with my arms instead of pushing on the seat with my butt, it does not work. Also one time I tried to get the bike up off its side with my legs directly under me and once again I could not get it up.

Once you do it a couple of times, it gets easier.
 

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70 Series Dunlop E3

If you don't want to go to the trouble to lay it over JBJ Cylcles in Santa Ana Ca. will do it and they are pretty close to you too.
I know JBJ will do it because I'm having that same tire put on the back of my bike there in about a week. :thumbup:
Oh I forgot to mention I have a trailer hitch on the back of my bike too.
 
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