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i am confident that your wings battery was fully charged within the first couple of minutes at idle

if u hook up the battery tender to your wing in the next few days it will show fully charged within a couple of minutes, if not i would suspect there is something wrong
 

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I have a digital volt meter on my bike,When I fire it up the meter reads 12.5-12.9 then you can hear the Alt kick in and see the meter start climbing to 14.4-14.9 and then settle down at it warms up while I get my gear on..

But as a rule I try and keep the bike on a tender plus,just to keep the battery up to full charge all the time...
 

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i am confident that your wings battery was fully charged within the first couple of minutes at idle

if u hook up the battery tender to your wing in the next few days it will show fully charged within a couple of minutes, if not i would suspect there is something wrong
I'm with cycledude on this. Considering you probably only crank the starter motor for a few seconds to start it, it will only take a minute or so to replace that amount of charge.

Just supposing for the sake of argument it takes 120 amps to run the starter motor, cranking it for 5 seconds consumes only about 1/6th of an Amp/hour capacity (120Amps*5seconds/60seconds/60minutes=0.16667Amp/hours). If the alternator can put out about 120 watts extra at idle as stated in the previous posts then it has just over 10 amps of charging current capacity (120watts/12volts=10Amps). Most of the charge has actually been returned within the first minute after the engine started in this example. (10Amps*60seconds/60seconds/60minutes=0.16667Amp/hours)

Depending on how many amps it really takes to run the starter motor and how long you actually crank, I would say it's a safe bet that your battery has almost certainly been fully charged back up within the first couple minutes, as cycledude stated above.
 

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You don't. If your bike won't start after a few weeks of sitting, something is wrong with it. Mine starts right up after a month. If you are riding every couple of weeks you have absolutely nothing to worry about.
Thats what I was thiking:agree:
 

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Exactly what Rocky said. Alternator putting out 14v at idle will indeed charge your 12.5v battery. My voltmeter shows battery a little over 12v and with engine running at an idle, alternator goes to over 14v.
 

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Depending on the age and condition of your battery, it may not be holding a charge very well, and lack of use of the bike, even for a few days, can significantly deplete the charge available for start up.
Exactly, that is why if your battery will not start your bike after a few weeks, there is, as I posted, <something wrong>. BTW, lead acid batteries can last for 50 years, and many lead acid batteries used in commercial and industrial applications have twenty (!) year warranties. If a battery has been maintained, age is really a non-factor.

My 2003 has the orginal battery and never has been on a tender. Not one starting issue, even though it is stored outside in Maine. Bike will start easily even after a month. If I were putting a bike away for the entire winter, I might throw it on a tender, but for a couple of weeks? Not necessary.
 
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Cycledude is right!!

Cycledude, you were right. I put the Battery Tender on the battery for the wing and after about 15 minutes or less, the green light came on on the tender telling me the battery was fully charged and the tender was only operating on "maintance mode". So it must have been pretty near fully charged before connecting the BT to it.
 

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Condensation will create rust in exhaust system if not properly evaporated! I would suggest to get another charger to keep a trickle......
 

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First off, nobody here is wrong except for anyone who would fully charge a very low battery with his charging system. HF has their version of the battery tenders on sale frequently for around 6 bucks each. I keep one on my emergency generator at home. When I attended a Honda school many years ago, it was explained that when you charge up a very low battery from your charging system you are potentially ruining a perfectly good battery....slow charging's best. I realize this choice is not always an option. Normally riding down the road, your regulator keeps your battery charged in little spurts as needed. If your battery's seriously down, the regulator dumps all the amperage available from your charging system into that battery. If this happens to be for an extended period of time, the battery can get hot and the plates inside warp and touch each other.....POSSIBLY(not always) ruining or otherwise decreasing the full functionality of the battery. A low amperage slow charge won't threaten the battery's longevity with the high heat. My suggestion would be (if not using a tender) and you really just HAVE to do something is to check your battery's voltage with a multitester. If you're around 12.5 or more Volts, then I wouldn't worry about it
 

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It's not exactly the same as your scenario since my battery is charged, but I decided to take some actual readings:



If you're starting with a weakened battery, the time required to get back to a charged condition will probably be longer, but my charging current dropped to pretty consistent 1.5A within a few minutes. I only let it run for about 10 minutes, but the current was pretty stable.
 
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