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Discussion Starter #1
I have a brand new Yuasa battery sitting in my office, But I have as of yet added the acid to the battery how long will this new battery last if no acid has been added?? I'm assuming for ever but i want to check before I put the new battery in my bike, just in case my older battery (still in bike/on a tender) is still strong enough to last another season.... My battery in bike is approx one or two years old now.....:laugh:
Thank you!

Ronnie
 
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Presumably you have a YTX20L-BS ??
If so, it is an AGM battery.


From Yuasa Tech Manual:

Yuasa batteries come from the factory in one of two ways:

Factory Activated (FA) where the battery is filled with electrolyte, sealed and charged at the factory.
These batteries must be used within a period of time and cannot be stored indefinitely.

The other type of battery is shipped dry and can be either a Conventional or AGM type of battery.
These batteries are sometimes referred to as Bottle Supplied (BS) because they are shipped with the electrolyte stored in a
plastic container. The battery is filled with electrolyte from
the container when it’s ready to be activated.
These types of factory sealed, dry batteries have an indefinite shelf life as long as they remain sealed (filler caps and red sealing cap in place
on a Conventional battery and foil sealing strip in place on an AGM battery).

Once it’s unsealed, a battery should be activated, charged and installed.
The plates of an unsealed battery will begin to oxidize making it more difficult to charge later.
 

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Assuming the battery in your bike is the type referred to by Farmguy in the preceding post. You may have to store that new battery for a while if you are not going to install it until the old battery gives out. I usually get a minimum of 6 years out of the OEM Yuasa batteries. I never use a tender but I ride my bike regularly. That is something you may not be able to do since you live in one of those frozen states.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
This battery is a YTX20HL-BS (brand new never used/acid is in it's own plastic container sent with newly purchased battery)
As I mentioned above: I have not added acid to the battery as of yet, I want to wait till the spring (warmer temps) to see how my current battery holds out... My old battery is approx 2 years old, always on tender, whenever I'm not riding bike, summer/winter..

Thanks for your answers

Ronnie
 

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My 2001 GL1800 OEM Battery lasted 10 years & my 2010 OEM Battery was still going after 8 years when I sold it . Both Bikes were ridden April to October, then stored in the garage for the winter months. I always removed the battery in October and stored it inside the basement, once 1 month I would hook it up to a 1 amp trickle charger for a few hours only.

Now with 2018 DCT Tour I'm leaving the battery in the bike while in winter storage with a TecMate Optimate 3 Battery Maintainer attached. Will be interesting to see what method provides the longest battery life.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I may have wasted good money buying this new battery as my current battery is approx 2-3 seasons old only....I may have a brand new battery for sale, come this spring....

Ronnie
 
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I doubt you'll need to replace your current battery for at least another 2 or 3 years. Some may get even more life out of their battery, but at 5 years I figure it's better to be safe than sorry. Whether to store the new battery you have now or to sell it and buy another in a few years . . . . your call!
 
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I'm with Blue on this one. About every 5 years I replace my battery because my trips take me into some remote areas and I will be gone for weeks at a time. Just don't want the inconvenience of an old battery failing out on the road.


As for the OP here. Yes, as stated, you can store the battery dry indefinitely. I have one like that setting on the shelf right now.


Corventure Dave
 

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Those of you who dont ride in the winter are going to have a longer battery life than those of us who do. I ride all winter on the weekends (weathee permitting) with the battery on a tender between rides and the additional strain put on the battery from starting the bike in sub-30 degree temperatures gives me about 5 years on a battery.
 

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My battery is now on year 6. I may try and buy yours when it starts to fail in a year or two.
 
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My 2 cents worth (FWIW), if a dry shipped battery is properly charged 20-30 minutes after activation with the electrolyte solution , that battery should last 5-10 years easy when maintained on a "Tender". Todays battery technology is so much better than the ones of yesteryear. As far as the factory shipped wet AGMs go, they too can last a decade if properly maintained. I swear, the current 'smart' charger/maintainers will double and even triple the life of a battery while in service...just keep them hooked up !
 

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LOL! You can sure tell people who don't read the actual question asked. :lol:
 

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From Yuasa 2019 Tech Manual:

7 STEPS TO ACTIVATE AN AGM BATTERY:

1. The battery must be out of the vehicle and placed on a level surface.

2. Remove electrolyte container from the plastic storage bag.
-Remove the strip of caps.
-Put the strip aside as you will use it later to seal the battery cells.
-For battery filling, use only the dedicated acid container that comes with the battery as it contains the proper amount of electrolyte for that specific battery.
--This is important to service life and battery performance.
-Do not pierce, or otherwise open the foil seals on the electrolyte container. Do not attempt to separate the individual electrolyte containers.

Keep this strip.

Do not puncture the foil seal or remove it prior to filling a dry AGM battery.
The electrolyte container that is shipped with a dry AGM battery contains the correct amount of battery acid and is more
concentrated that the electrolyte used in a conventional battery.

3. Place the electrolyte container with the foil seals facing down into the cell filler ports on the battery.
Hold the container level and push down to break the foil seals.
Electrolyte will start to flow into the battery and air bubbles will be seen inside the container.
Do not tilt the electrolyte container.

4. Check the electrolyte flow. Keep the container in place for 20 minutes or longer until it empties completely.
If no air bubbles are coming up from the filler ports, or if container cells haven’t emptied completely after 20 minutes, tap the container gently and/or battery case a few times to cause the
electrolyte to flow into the battery.

Do not remove the acid container from the battery until it is completely empty.
The battery requires all of the electrolyte from the container for proper operation.

Bubbles will appear as the electrolyte container fills the battery indicating the flow of battery acid.
Tap the container periodically to keep the electrolyte flowing until the container is completely empty.
Never puncture the top of the acid container to speed up the filling process.


5. Carefully remove the empty electrolyte container from the battery.
Fully insert the strip of sealing caps (previously removed from the electrolyte container) into the battery filling ports.
Make sure the strip of caps is fully inserted and flush with the top of the battery.
Insert the caps by hand, do not use a hammer or excessive force.

Never remove the strip of caps or add water or electrolyte to the battery during its service life.

6. For batteries with ratings of less than 18 AH, let the battery stand for 20 to 60 minutes.

For batteries with higher AH ratings, and/or having the High Performance rating (designated by an “H” in the part number/name) allow the battery to stand for 1 to 2 hours.
Yuasa AGM batteries have the amp hour (AH) printed on the front of the battery case.

The stand, or rest period, allows the electrolyte to permeate into the plates for optimum performance.

7. Newly activated AGM batteries require an initial charge.

After adding electrolyte, a new battery is approximately 75-80% charged.

After the “stand” period (step 6), charge the battery to bring it to a full state-of-charge.
The battery charger used for initial charging should be able to charge at 12.8+ volts for an AGM battery.

All Yuasa battery chargers are capable of reaching this minimum voltage and initializing/ activating an AGM battery.

https://www.yuasabatteries.com/wp-c...asa-Battery-Application-Guide-2019.x78244.pdf
 

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I've got 7 years and 70,000 miles on my 2012's original battery without even the slightest sign of failure yet. It still starts just like it did when it was brand new.
 
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