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I am still amazed by this clip. The guy had more than enough help there to keep that bike upright nearly all the way up the ramp. What I can't figure out is why the guy slowed down? He had it made if he only would have goosed it a bit on the way up the ramp. He didn't drive off the ramp he just fell over. Duh.
 

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Dumazz! Get halfway up the ramp and stop. What a maroon.
 

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bet he thought he was gonna hit his head on top of truck.
 

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What goes up slow must come down hard. :eek:4:
 

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He already had in his mind what the result turned out to be.
 

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This is especially funny to me! You see, for 4-1/2 years, I had "The World's Greatest Job!" I was a "Transfer Driver" for Ryder Truck Rentals in southern California.

Transfer drivers usually use cars or small pickups or minivans to transfer trucks. They drive to the dealer, hook up a tow dolly or a car carrier, load their vehicle into the carrier and then drive the truck from one dealership to another. Then they unload their vehicle, and either leave the carrier/dolly at that dealership or return it to the one it was "borrowed" from. Then they go do the next truck.

Well ... I was the very first :thumbup:, and ultimately one of only three transfer drivers in America who used a motorcycle to transfer the trucks. At first Ryder was skeptical, for the very reason demonstrated in this video. I assured them that I could do it though, so they tried me out!

Other transfer drivers or TDs could move about 5 to 8 trucks per week. By using my GOLDWINGS (First the '82 GL100, and later the 96 GL1500) , I was able to transfer an average of 40 to 50 trucks per week. I was making about $1,000.00 per week for riding my motorcycle most of the day!

I'd get to the dealer, drop the ramp, and ride the Wing up into the truck. Then I'd nose it up against the front of the box and tie it down with four straps.

The first time I LOADED the bike, I thought, "Gosh! I hope this ramp will support my Wing and me!" I had a much longer 'runway' that the guy in this video. I would give myself about 80 to 100 feet to get my feet up, get my balance, center on the ramp and adjust my speed BEFORE I hit the bottom of the ramp, allowing for time to abort the approach if something didn't feel right. I rode up that ramp 50 times mentally in my head before I actually did it for the first time. "No ... too slow ... no ... too fast! Exactly where will I back off of the throttle? What if the front wheel catches air? ..."

I finally did it for the first time and was surprised that I nailed it! The right speed, good balance, clutch in and rear brake applied at exactly the right moment. Gosh, it seemed almost TOO easy.

When I got to my destination, I'd have to BACK the bike down the ramp! The Wing was too long to spin around inside of the truck. The very first time I had to do this, it took some 20 minutes of mental exercises to go through all of the possible scenarios. By centering the bike on the ramp (what most people would think you should do), you only had inches of ramp on either side of the 24" to 28" wide ramp for balance, and even with your tippie-toes turned in, it was too nerve wracking to unload the bike that way. The ramps tend to bounce like a diving board if you are not rock steady in your movements. VERY scary! :eek:4:

Besides that, when backing a bike down a ramp, the front brake is worthless. The front wheel will slide and the speed of the decent will be uncontrollable.

There are actually TWO ways to unload a bike safely.

#1. (My preferred method) Since the rear brake would be needed to prevent the bike from rolling backwards down the ramp too quickly, I concluded that my right foot would always be on that brake during unload, and therefore there was no need for any ramp surface on the right side of the bike. By backing the bike so that the rear tire rolls down the right side of the ramp within an inch or so of the right edge, it doubled the amount of exposed ramp on the left side, allowing me to easily balance the bike while I scooted my foot backward against the left ramp rail. The process was:

Start the bike and put it into first gear. Hold clutch in. This will allow me to abort the unload and pull back into the truck if my unload is off.
Ease off of the rear brake to roll back about a foot, allowing the rear wheel to begin the descent and stop again.
Get my balance.
Step backward with the left foot so my leg supports the bike but will allow me to maintain balance when the bike rolls backward another 18 inches.
Set left foot securely against ramp rail.
Roll backward 18 inches or so.
Stop the bike again.
Slide left foot backward.
Repeat the process until I am on the ground.

#2 Method - The footwork is the same, and the bike still rolls down the right side of the ramp, but the engine is off, and the bike is in first gear. By using the clutch instead of the rear brake on a bike that has the rear brake foot pedal in an inconvenient spot, I can lock the rear wheel by releasing the clutch, and let the bike "slip" backward by taking some of the pressure off of the clutch plates. I do not like this method because it eliminates the abort option since the engine is off.

Once I unloaded the bike, I'd ride to the next dealership and do it again. I transferred about 8,000 trucks in this way without incident.

This Harley guy didn't allow himself enough 'runway' to get balanced, and he made the mistake of backing off of the throttle and grabbing the clutch half way up the ramp. The outcome was predictable!
 

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This is clear case of target fixation. He was definitely psyching and preparing how to bail when he failed. Look where we want to go, not where we don't want to go. Head and eyes!
 

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An addendum to Gravedigger's excellent tutorial...

A third method I've found useful for unloading is to use the reverse mechanism. The bike won't roll when the button is not pushed, and this allows you to use either side for the descent.
 

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Ive loaded my Wing like that several times, but each time, I backed the truck up to a bank to make the ramp more horizontal, but have also ridden up the ramp many times as well. It's a mind over matter thang, I think. No different than riding down the sidewalk to get the kids on their tricycles off there, but just uphill instead...

Hate to see a bike fall like that, in any case!
 

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There is NO WAY this guy's name is "Steve". A "Steve" would never have an epic failure like that. He should have his "Steve" card pulled immediately. <sheesh> :eek:4:
 

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....Not enough power to pull a greasy string out of a cats a$$.

:nojoke:
 

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I saw the exact same thing happen one day while at Strokers.

For those who don't know, Strokers is a custom Chopper shop here in Dallas and they make nice (read EXPENSIVE) bikes - it's not unusual to see bikes for $50-70 grand and up in the showroom.

I was having a burger there one day (the restaurant is located in the back) and a guy and his buddies arrived in their pickup truck to take home his brand new chopper. They put a ramp up, he got on the bike and up he went.

He made it all the way to the top where the low slung engine got stuck where the ramp met the bed. He tried to put his foot down, but it was in empty air and he and his his brand new bike tumbled onto the pavement. Ouch.

I've always wondered what that little repair cost......
 

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What a great gig Gravedigger. I would have loved to have had that job. So, can I guess what your new job is from your sig?

I was thinking what Seabear said to use the reverse would have made it more stable. I wonder if you could have used reverse and backed the bike into the truck any easier.

At first, it seemed to me like the people sitting in the garage should have paid for those seats to watch this.

:eek:4:
 

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What a great gig Gravedigger. I would have loved to have had that job. So, can I guess what your new job is from your sig?
No. I have this odd hobby. I'm a ghost hunter. No, not like the guys you see on TV. I normally work alone, but will join, or bring a group along if they are mature and serious. Laugh if you will, but the first time you get irrefutable evidence of contact with the other side, it will change your life forever.

I was thinking what Seabear said to use the reverse would have made it more stable. I wonder if you could have used reverse and backed the bike into the truck any easier.
Only the Wing has reverse. The other bikes would not benefit from that, and I see the reverse as a BIG red flag. With the reverse engaged, if you get into trouble, you cannot ride the bike back up into the truck quickly. you are committed to the ONE-SHOT attempt. I would not use reverse in either direction.
 
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