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I’m brand new to the world of GPS, and I’m not sure how to interpret the data from my new Zumo 595. This last weekend I went on a ride with 3 Eagles to San Antonio and back to visit Tom Finch. Just before I left to meet up with 3 Eagles I found a screen that would summarize my trip data. I zeroed the data, and left on my ride. That was at 6:45 AM on 8/9/19. I returned home at 4:30 PM on 8/11/19. So, my actual trip lasted almost 58 hours. From the time when I started until now has been about 77 hours.

I just went to the garage to clean my bike and decided to check the trip data. I took a picture of the screen, and that immediately raised some questions.

How does the GPS calculate the “Stopped”. time? I had figured that the GPS wouldn’t know the ride was over until I reset and zeroed the screen. However, the GPS shows a total time of 19 hr, 10 minutes, with a stopped time of 1 hr, 29 minutes. For the time that we were actually riding, and just stopping for gas that is just about spot on.

However, it doesn’t seem to account for time we spent at the motel after got to San Antonio, or the time at the celebration on Saturday.

Can you help me interpret the data?
 

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The GPS was turned off completely during those two times you mentioned.

With the GPS turned on, it was collecting your elapsed ride time - including 1.5 hours of stop time (fuel?)
 

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OK Ken, I guess that makes sense. It is wired into a keyed switch on the bike, and shuts down shortly after I turn off the key. Perhaps it keeps running internally for a few minutes even after I turn off the bike, so would record the stopped time at the fuel pump but would shut down when stopped at the motel.

I'll start using this screen and learn how to use the data now that you've pointed me in the right direction.

Glen
 

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Some features vary by model and by software version. This may or may not be one of them.

I've noticed on my 2797 that what @kwthom is describing is true. Time not moving with the GPS on counts as stopped time in the total time. Time with the GPS off counts as nothing, not in total or stopped time.

On a separate note -- at gas stops, particularly when I'm on a cert ride, I don't want my GPS to turn off. Sure, you can get in the habit of pressing the button under the "I'm turning off in 15 sec unless you press the button" notice and then it will stay on until the battery dies or your power cycle the bike again. I did that for a while, sometimes. Then I did the little key stub / radio button mod so I have a knob for my gas door. Since I no longer have to take out the key to open the gas door, my m.o. is to turn the key to Aux which leaves on the GPS power (I'm using the aux circuit on the OEM fuse panel for the GPS power) and also leaves on the dash panel for trip reset, reading the Odo, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Some features vary by model and by software version. This may or may not be one of them.

I've noticed on my 2797 that what @kwthom is describing is true. Time not moving with the GPS on counts as stopped time in the total time. Time with the GPS off counts as nothing, not in total or stopped time.

On a separate note -- at gas stops, particularly when I'm on a cert ride, I don't want my GPS to turn off. Sure, you can get in the habit of pressing the button under the "I'm turning off in 15 sec unless you press the button" notice and then it will stay on until the battery dies or your power cycle the bike again. I did that for a while, sometimes. Then I did the little key stub / radio button mod so I have a knob for my gas door. Since I no longer have to take out the key to open the gas door, my m.o. is to turn the key to Aux which leaves on the GPS power (I'm using the aux circuit on the OEM fuse panel for the GPS power) and also leaves on the dash panel for trip reset, reading the Odo, etc.
Yes, I admit that I've done that for other reasons at times. Like I said, I just found this particular data screen just before this ride. and I might start doing that at fuel stops for cert rides. Not sure how to handle a 3 or 4 hour stop at the IB motel though. Oh well, it's a learning process. I have a lot to learn about routing with this GPS already!
 

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IronMan
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The GPS was turned off completely during those two times you mentioned.

With the GPS turned on, it was collecting your elapsed ride time - including 1.5 hours of stop time (fuel?)
"TEXAS BS TIME " :laugh:
 

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IronMan
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I’m brand new to the world of GPS, and I’m not sure how to interpret the data from my new Zumo 595. This last weekend I went on a ride with 3 Eagles to San Antonio and back to visit Tom Finch. Just before I left to meet up with 3 Eagles I found a screen that would summarize my trip data. I zeroed the data, and left on my ride. That was at 6:45 AM on 8/9/19. I returned home at 4:30 PM on 8/11/19. So, my actual trip lasted almost 58 hours. From the time when I started until now has been about 77 hours.

I just went to the garage to clean my bike and decided to check the trip data. I took a picture of the screen, and that immediately raised some questions.

How does the GPS calculate the “Stopped”. time? I had figured that the GPS wouldn’t know the ride was over until I reset and zeroed the screen. However, the GPS shows a total time of 19 hr, 10 minutes, with a stopped time of 1 hr, 29 minutes. For the time that we were actually riding, and just stopping for gas that is just about spot on.

However, it doesn’t seem to account for time we spent at the motel after got to San Antonio, or the time at the celebration on Saturday.

Can you help me interpret the data?
I'VE BEEN THRU AND AROUND BUCH TEXAS OVER THE YEARS AND I KNOW MY MEMORY AINT WHAT IT USED TO BE BUT I REALLY DONT RECALL SEEING A "93" MPH SPEED LIMIT SIGN ?? :surprise::wink2::laugh:
 

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IronMan
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ok ken, i guess that makes sense. It is wired into a keyed switch on the bike, and shuts down shortly after i turn off the key. Perhaps it keeps running internally for a few minutes even after i turn off the bike, so would record the stopped time at the fuel pump but would shut down when stopped at the motel.

I'll start using this screen and learn how to use the data now that you've pointed me in the right direction.

Glen
i use phone or bikes gps and with keys in gas lock n glove as stated above i usually just put key to aux. Dont have to remember ( think ) so much !
 

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I'VE BEEN THRU AND AROUND BUCH TEXAS OVER THE YEARS AND I KNOW MY MEMORY AINT WHAT IT USED TO BE BUT I REALLY DONT RECALL SEEING A "93" MPH SPEED LIMIT SIGN ?? :surprise::wink2::laugh:
He musta been up on Texas I-30 which is the toll road and the speed limit is 85 mph. As the old trooper said, "9 you're fine, 10 you're mine". Guess he kept it at 8 over the speed limit to be safe. >:)
 

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I'll start using this screen and learn how to use the data now that you've pointed me in the right direction.
No problem, Glen.

Since the bike's GPS don't have this screen (bummer...), alternate means to monitor LD endurance rides are needed. This screen is a big help for those that are doing LD riding to understand that minimizing stop times really helps on those more challenging rides.

Moving average is the speed you're doing - while the bike is moving. How fast? Probably set to some fairly slow value (5 MPH or so...). Yes, you're moving toward that >1000 mile mark on a Saddlesore...

The other is the Overall average; and we've discussed that. As long as the GPS is powered, this 'clock' is elapsing. Note the differential between these two values. In your example, your stops were very efficient. For that Saddlesore ride, the overall average needs to be 42MPH.

Thus, the 19:10 at 58MPH would be a very sedate Saddlesore - if this data was all done as one contiguous ride.

For Android, I use Ulysse Speedometer to collect this type of information on LD rides. The key values that I really pay attention to are the moving and overall average speeds - as well as the differential between them. Those three values give me a good quick snapshot of ride efficiency.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No problem, Glen.

Since the bike's GPS don't have this screen (bummer...), alternate means to monitor LD endurance rides are needed. This screen is a big help for those that are doing LD riding to understand that minimizing stop times really helps on those more challenging rides.

Moving average is the speed you're doing - while the bike is moving. How fast? Probably set to some fairly slow value (5 MPH or so...). Yes, you're moving toward that >1000 mile mark on a Saddlesore...

The other is the Overall average; and we've discussed that. As long as the GPS is powered, this 'clock' is elapsing. Note the differential between these two values. In your example, your stops were very efficient. For that Saddlesore ride, the overall average needs to be 42MPH.

Thus, the 19:10 at 58MPH would be a very sedate Saddlesore - if this data was all done as one contiguous ride.

For Android, I use Ulysse Speedometer to collect this type of information on LD rides. The key values that I really pay attention to are the moving and overall average speeds - as well as the differential between them. Those three values give me a good quick snapshot of ride efficiency.
You're right again. I've done lots of SS1000's, and try to keep them well under 16 hours. A 16 hour SS1000 is 62.5 mph moving average, and that is what it takes to do a BBG1500. I've done several BBG's, usually in about 22.5 hours but I have to have my auxiliary tank to do that.

On the subject of efficient stopped times I just yesterday experimented and found that I can access the I-phones stopwatch through Siri and Bluetooth (I told you I am brand new to technology) so I can do a better job of monitoring my fuel stops. I try to keep them under 7 minutes when I'm on the clock.

Uncle John, that 93 mph must have been a computer error. I would NEVER exceed a posted speed limit!:grin2:

Glen
 

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Speed limit

I'VE BEEN THRU AND AROUND BUCH TEXAS OVER THE YEARS AND I KNOW MY MEMORY AINT WHAT IT USED TO BE BUT I REALLY DONT RECALL SEEING A "93" MPH SPEED LIMIT SIGN ?? :surprise::wink2::laugh:
Says the guy who religiously following the speed limit without exception. Is this the pot calling the kettle black? :grin2:
 

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IronMan
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Says the guy who religiously following the speed limit without exception. Is this the pot calling the kettle black? :grin2:
I RUN A WONKY TIRE AND ALWAYS GET CONFUSED IF SPEEDO IS CORRECT :surprise::wink2:
 

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We'll wander down this tangent...for a moment... :mrgreen:

On the subject of efficient stopped times I just yesterday experimented and found that I can access the I-phones stopwatch through Siri and Bluetooth (I told you I am brand new to technology) so I can do a better job of monitoring my fuel stops. I try to keep them under 7 minutes when I'm on the clock.
In an alternate universe, some individual got right pi$$ed-off when I mentioned that a sub-ten minute stop was a stop to strive for while on the clock.

I managed to plot a graph of the stop times I had (excluding overnight stops) for my 48 State ride last year. The data was collected by my GoPro camera taking photos every 30 seconds as well as correlating that with GPX data. My average stop time was 11 minutes. I had 16 stops above average, while 46 stops were below average. This is a total of 66 stops over 8+ days.

Not many are going to hit that 8 minute mark at every stop, I didn't. Yet, I did hit a decent percentage between 7 & 8 minutes when I could. The configuration of stop location, and a whole host of things may inhibit those kinds of stop times.

*** BACK ON TOPIC ***

Interpretation of the GPS data can be a fun brain-exercise 18 hours into a ride. When you figure out that you still have three more hours and another state to grab before you get food - and sleep. :thumbup:
 

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Don't get me wrong! When I say I try to keep them under 7 minutes I didn't say I always succeed. It's a goal. Sometimes I make it. Sometimes I fumble the ball.

If everything goes right I can do 7 minute stops. That's when I just have to get fuel only. If I have tp go inside for a bathroom break or to get a receipt, or to rummage around in the Tailwind for more food or water, it quickly turns into 10 minutes or more. So, if I have to go inside every other stop I'm back to 9 minutes easily.

Also, until I start using the stopwatch I mentioned, I'm talking just stopped times at the pump. Most seasoned riders time their stops from the time they have to begin slowing, until they are back up to speed.

You're right about some not understanding those times. Very few people can even comprehend the mindset of an Ironbutt rider on the clock.
 

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It's good to develop a battle rhythm and use a stopwatch to keep yourself honest. Concur with ramp to ramp time rather than parked time as the metric that matters. Stop selection counts as does efficiency.

Lots of great apps out there, but I am increasingly modest about my ability to flip from one to another, use them with gloves on, and be safe about it. Unless you have mastered telling Siri or GiGi (Google Girl) through voice commands to start your stopwatch and report out the end time, I might:

1) don't fiddle with the app. You can pull your GPS track after the run and measure ramp to ramp time super easily by pulling it into BaseCamp.

2) Slap some velcro on one of these and put it somewhere. That one costs a few bucks more but has buttons that actually work instead of the bargain models that leave you hanging.

3) all of the above.
 

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Back to this for a sec...

Also, until I start using the stopwatch I mentioned, I'm talking just stopped times at the pump. Most seasoned riders time their stops from the time they have to begin slowing, until they are back up to speed.

You're right about some not understanding those times. Very few people can even comprehend the mindset of an Ironbutt rider on the clock.
If you have your proverbial 'stuff in one sock', you'll have a pretty good idea that on the same side of the freeway you're going at at a point where you can see your destination, that it's a minute or so from the STOP sign to the pump.

Now, since that exit ramp is still (generally speaking...) still in the same direction I'm going, that 'clock' doesn't start until I hit that STOP sign. (A Yield is even better...no stopping :mrgreen: ) Yet, if it's another 30 seconds to a minute before you're in position, well...it's the time it takes to get to the fuel pump.

The mechanics of pumping the fuel, getting the receipt and the photograph of the odometer/receipt etc. - pretty rote by the time you've done it a hundred times or so. :lol:

As soon as I'm generally speaking, moving in the direction I need to continue, my timer is done. Thus, yeah, might be at that pump 7 or 8 minutes, bake in another minute or two of approach and departure time...so, now you're maybe at 9 to 11 minutes.

Once you're reasonably consistent, then you can use programs like BaseCamp to more accurately estimate stoppage times.

The data review helps your brain get used to that cadence. Once you have it, your brain 'knows' you've done a efficient stop.

Eighteen or more hours into a ride...it also helps to know when I'm losing it. :thumbup:
 
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