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Just got a new large capacity Apple IPOD, and have lots of music on my Cassette disk on tape. What is the methodology to transfer this music thru my computer to my new IPOD? Or is it possible..any help will be greatly appreciated.....
 

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I use Magix Audio Cleaning Lab 10 software record the tapes on the computer, and a Creative Soundblaster Audigy 2 Platinum sound card for the input from the tape deck. I connect my receiver to the RCA line in jacks on the sound card control module. (not the mini jack on the rear of the sound card) I use a DBX 400X Program Route Selector to select the cassette deck or one of the reel to reel decks. (You don't need the 400X for a single cassette deck, I have three tape decks and the computer to connect so I find it useful)

I converted about 150 reel to reel tapes and a like number of cassette tapes to CD audio, then ripped the CDs to MP3 files for the IPod. I am working on my record collection now.
 

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I have a feeling you want basic info. Here's what I did. First connect a cassette player to your line input on your PC. ( hope you have a fairly new one ) You will need a mini jack cord. Set your volume on the cassette player to about 2/3 up. Play your tapes and record each song you like. You must use some type of music recording program, like Music Match or something like that. You can download MM free. Transfer all your music files into your iTunes library. Download to your iPod. Test the first few recordings when you first start and make sure they aren't too loud or they will be distorted. If you want more detailed info you can PM me.
 

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Play your tapes and record each song you like. You must use some type of music recording program, like Music Match or something like that. You can download MM free. Transfer all your music files into your iTunes library. Download to your iPod. Test the first few recordings when you first start and make sure they aren't too loud or they will be distorted. If you want more detailed
I am afraid it is a little more complicated than this if you want quality tracks to play. I converted 50 Cassettes (CS) and 35 LPs to MP3 to play on my player. (All old stuff that was never remastered and released on CD

First when you record to your PC you will record one side of the CS at a time which will record as a single track (Unless you want to sit there and stop and start the player at the end of each track every 2.20 minutes)

The quality of the recorded music is probably not great and probably not Digital Dolby. Then you have the Rice Krispies problem (Snap Crakel & Pop) on the track.

If you want to clean that up you have to use a sound editor, if you want to increase the volume, another process and if you want individual tracks you have to cut the single track into multiple.

If you don't want 8 second trailer or entry space on each track you have to cut the silence on each track to something reasonable like 4 sec at the end and .5 Sec at the start.

A lot of work to do it right. I have sound edited over 1150 CD's to MP3/WMA to play on the bike. Lot of work but fun when the snow falls if you have a bunch of spare time hanging around.
 

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How much you put into this probably depends on how many tapes you need to convert. I agree that is ultimate sound quality is the goal, then by all means throw a bunch of money at the problem.

I only had about a dozen cassettes to convert so I went cheap. As was previously posted, just line-out of your cassette to the line-in on your computer. Use Music Match to capture the entire side A then side B.

It is true that at that point, the entire side will be an mp3 (which you can transfer to Itunes) and you will not be able to jump around between tracks with any accuracy, but the sound quality is not bad considering the sound quality of that 20 year old cassette wasn't that great to begin with!

Good Luck,

Lance
 

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Magic Audio Cleaning Lab is about $40, will detect the breaks in each song, will allow you to tag each track with artist, title, album, etc, (it will actually look up the tracks for you in most cases) and will allow you to clean the recordings how you desire. It creates CD audio files that can be played in an audio CD player (like Honda's), and it can create MP3 files from each track if that is all you want. You don't have to record each side seperately, as you can adjust the track spacing between tracks and cut parts you don't want. Version 11 is out now, $39.99 from Best Buy or CompUSA.. Connect the audio from your deck to your computer however you want, and record with the software.

http://site.magix.net/english-us/home/m ... n=standard

It took me about 1.5 hours per tape to record, clean up, burn to CD audio, then rip them to mp3.

I had hundreds of tapes to do, plus a large number of records so it was worth buying the software for me.
 

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I think its easyer, cheaper and better quality when you download the songs from the internet.
 
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