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I have the belly pan to help protect my coolant bottle. My 05 has a lowering kit on it and I drag bottom on speed bumps and the kit takes the scratches instead of the frame. The only negative thing I can think of is and I'm not exactly sure, but my rear tire seems to get hotter and pressure goes up. I think this happens because the belly pan doesn't allow the bottom of the engine to get rid on its heat in a wider atmosphere environment but flows it towards the tire. I wish a air tunnel experiment could be performed to verify my thinking. I have a TPMS on the bike and will start off with rear tire pressure 1 or 2 pounds below the specified 41 lbs. But shortly it will reach the specification and sometimes climb as high as 48 lbs. I know tire manufacturers take this into consideration when they make the specifications. But how high is too high?
 

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Looking at those belly pan pics, I cannot believe anyone would still be using slotted screws. That is so 1950's.
Not sure what your calling a slotted screw. Never heard of that before. But I'm going to guess your talking about Dzus fasteners that are currently being used for modern aircraft and all levels of racing.
 

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But I'm going to guess your talking about Dzus fasteners that are currently being used for modern aircraft and all levels of racing.
Worked in the airline industry for 35 years. Dzus (pronounced Zeus) fasteners are everywhere on aircraft and work really well. It keeps the screw or faster bolt from become FOD when accessing openings on the aircraft. FOD is bad for aircraft and has a dual meaning in the aircraft world. You would be surprised how much damage a small metal screw can do to a titanium jet engine compress blade.

Side note. If you have damage to one compressor blade say on the first stage blades of the engine, you have to go and basically damage (grind out the same amount of metal) on the opposite blade to rebalance the blades. But it does not take much damage at all to damage the blade beyond repair and require replacing the blade. 25 years ago one B757 first stage compressor blade cost $65,000.
 

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A slotted screw is the old, single slot style of screw head - every toolbox in America probably has slotted and phillips screwdrivers in it.
 
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