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Discussion Starter #1
My wife and I will be heading to northern California in a couple of weeks on vacation and I knew I needed to get some maintenance performed on the bike before we go.

Today I put the bike on the lift and pulled the rear tire. That made it easier to clean the rear wheel and replacing the brake pads (more accessible). I replaced all the pads front and rear, plus since it's been a while since doing the Final drive oil I drained and refilled that.

While I had the front wheel covers off to get to the calipers I sprayed wheel cleaner and scrubbed that wheel as well. I haven't cleaned my wheels in years.

After that I pulled the assembly that houses the Fog Light and Flasher switches as well as the suspension up and down switches and sprayed each of them with Radio Shack Contact cleaner. Both the Fog Light and the Flasher switches were stuck in and with that cleaner I was able to work the spray into the assembly enough to free each of them up.

As to that assembly, what's the deal with that back cover plate? I can never get that thing to snap back in place. It's on there but not like it should be. I would have taped it but I had too much oil residue from the cleaner on the cover for the tape to stick. I guess I'll just be happy with it just shoved back into place and all the wiring holding it.

Anyway, after a nice long shower I'm clean again, my bike is in much better shape and I can feel good about setting off on a nice long vacation.

Bryan
 

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Bryan,

If you replaced all the brake pads, what did you do with the brake fluid that overfilled their respective reservoirs when you compressed the calipers' pistons in to allow for extra room for the thicker brake pads?

I almost always change my brake fluids when replacing the brake pads, and since I replace brake fluids more often than replacing brake pads, I always make sure I check the thickness of the brake pads when replacing the brake fluids.
 

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My wife and I will be heading to northern California in a couple of weeks on vacation and I knew I needed to get some maintenance performed on the bike before we go.

Today I put the bike on the lift and pulled the rear tire. That made it easier to clean the rear wheel and replacing the brake pads (more accessible). I replaced all the pads front and rear, plus since it's been a while since doing the Final drive oil I drained and refilled that.

While I had the front wheel covers off to get to the calipers I sprayed wheel cleaner and scrubbed that wheel as well. I haven't cleaned my wheels in years.

After that I pulled the assembly that houses the Fog Light and Flasher switches as well as the suspension up and down switches and sprayed each of them with Radio Shack Contact cleaner. Both the Fog Light and the Flasher switches were stuck in and with that cleaner I was able to work the spray into the assembly enough to free each of them up.

As to that assembly, what's the deal with that back cover plate? I can never get that thing to snap back in place. It's on there but not like it should be. I would have taped it but I had too much oil residue from the cleaner on the cover for the tape to stick. I guess I'll just be happy with it just shoved back into place and all the wiring holding it.

Anyway, after a nice long shower I'm clean again, my bike is in much better shape and I can feel good about setting off on a nice long vacation.

Bryan
:thumbup:

Spending "quality time" with the big girl in the garage always improves my enjoyment of our riding time.

Enjoy your vacation to NorCal.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I loosen the reservoirs (behind right side cover and on right handlebar) and place a shop towel under them so when the fluid overflows the towels catch it. Once finished I tighten them and then pump the brakes until they are solid then check their levels.

Bryan,

If you replaced all the brake pads, what did you do with the brake fluid that overfilled their respective reservoirs when you compressed the calipers' pistons in to allow for extra room for the thicker brake pads?

I almost always change my brake fluids when replacing the brake pads, and since I replace brake fluids more often than replacing brake pads, I always make sure I check the thickness of the brake pads when replacing the brake fluids.
 
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Nothing makes one "feel" better than changing oil for the third time today. :lol:
 
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