GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well... I managed to take it out!!!! YEAH!!!!
I am so proud of myself... :roll:

I'd like to thank all who contributed!
The cumulative wisdom strikes again !!!! :bow::bow::bow:

How I did it:
I followed the directions from the site that I actually never saw before when I was poking around prior to ordering... THANK YOU, BigMick !!! :bow:

I took the caliper apart (disconnected and drained the banjos).
Put it in a vise, hammered in 4mm elbow hex, turn - no dice. Try again - spun out.
Drilled a 1/4" deep hole (trying my best to be centered) a bit larger and hammered in 4.5 mm hex - BINGO!!!!!! It's out !!!!:thumbup:

Took a good magnet and collected all the shavings, pushed the pucks all the way in, which cleared out the bleeder hole with whatever fluid was still inside.

Hope that helps someone!

P.S. I spoke to Mike from the Speed Bleeders Co,.
Made a suggestion to alter their instructions a bit to prevent others from falling into the same trap.

They say " screw in speed bleeder into a caliper until it seats".
Well... this "until it seats" part is what did me in (and I am sure many others before and more to come).

Seeing that the OEM bleeder nut seats flush against the caliper and that what I thought was the goal here. I thought that the resistance was from the thread locker and it REALLY DID NOT TAKE MUCH to snap.

So, I suggested that they mention that there will be a couple of threads still showing above the caliper when the bleeder is actually seated already.

Now, that I had emptied the front master cylinder prior to removing the banjo bold - I need to replace fluid and bleed the WHOLE system.
Any advise on that would be appreciated...[Should I crack open all the bleeders at the same time (front) to let the lines prime or still do one at a time?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,914 Posts
They say " screw in speed bleeder into a caliper until it seats".
Well... this "until it seats" part is what did me in (and I am sure many others before and more to come).
Glad you got it squared away :thumbup:

When I put mine in, I compared the thread lengths of the OEM and the speed bleeders and quickly realized that the speed bleeder nut will not be in the same position as the OEM when tightened down, since the thread lengths between the two are different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
818 Posts
I think the procedure for doing one at a time in the order specified in the service manual would be the most appropriate process for bleeding the entire system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,537 Posts
Glad you got it out. :thumbup:

You have no Idea how many people come into my shop with a broken bolt in something that they have drilled off center, and then broke an easy-out off in the hole as well.

Unless you have a Mighty-Vac,

The best/ quickest way we have found to bleed out 4 wheel disc brakes on race cars, is to run a piece of clear tubing from the bleeders into a bottle with brake fluid in them, and "slowly" pump the M/C.

The fluid in the bottles will keep from sucking air back into the lines.

Be very careful not to get brake fluid on any plastic or painted surfaces.

I would put the M/C top on while pumping and keep an eye on the sight glass so you don't run it out of fluid and suck in air.

And wrap the M/C with a towel just in case it drips while removing the top, and/or adding fluid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Im glad it worked out for you.:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup: I had the bleeders on an 03 LC and I noticed a week or so after installing them I had some brake fluid weeps. I had to tighten them down some more and I was afraid I would snap them. They never leaked after that again but JIC I wound up getting a Motion Pro bleeder which is a portable speed bleeder. Works like a champ. With the trike and the rear brakes my arm just cant stretch that far. On the brakes I would fill them up and bleed the whole system several times to be sure of no air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Ok, I am all done!
New front pads (in a process discovered that the spring pad in the left caliper was bent bad...First open since new! I straightened it and put it back for now. The new one is on the way).

Bled the whole system. Took a while (I removed right front top bleeder to pump until the fluid started coming thru, then put it right back)

I can't say that the front brake lever is rock hard though, pedal is better.
I really don't remember anymore how it was, but seems that it could be harder.

Maybe I will bleed front again when new spring arrives for the caliper.

It really feels good to do it with my own hands and your brains :clap2::beer2:
But, seriously I feel more "intimate" with my bike...


NO FUNNY COMMENTS, PLEASE!!! :a13:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,326 Posts
I can't say that the front brake lever is rock hard though, pedal is better.
I really don't remember anymore how it was, but seems that it could be harder.
Wrap a rubber band around the front brake lever holding it full applied. Hang a weight on the rear brake pedal keeping it engaged. Leave over night and be amazed at how much better your brakes are in the morning.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top