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Today driving my cage,I was following a Lonely Goldwing and I noticed that he drove in the middle of the lane ( 2lane) and I was Just wondering where everyone drove by yourself? I myself drive in the closest to the centerline,staggered in a group, in the middle when its raining. HOW ABOUT YOU!!!!:popcorn:
 

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My dad told me a long time ago to ride in the part of the lane most likely to be seen. To me that was, on a two lane, in the left part of the lane. I always try to avoid the center portion because that is where the oil, coolant, and other bad stuff tends to be.
 

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I will use the entire lane depending on each situation as it arises. I won't ride with anyone that wants to ride two abreast, for my safety I need the full lane.
Jakec
 

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Usually ride left of center or right of center never in the middle. Most of the time it is left of center.
 

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Today driving my cage,I was following a Lonely Goldwing and I noticed that he drove in the middle of the lane ( 2lane) and I was Just wondering where everyone drove by yourself? I myself drive in the closest to the centerline,staggered in a group, in the middle when its raining. HOW ABOUT YOU!!!!:popcorn:
Apparently, I'm going to want to drive ahead of you and not behind. Why would you run on the grease strip when its raining ? This is one of many reasons why I usually ride alone.
 

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From my MSF training, I recollect that the lane is broken down into 3 tracks: left, center, & right. The recommendation is to ride in the left or right track because the center track is where most of the oil builds up, and thus possible loss of traction could occur, especially when it rains.

Personally, I like to ride the left track of a lane so that: (1) on-coming vehicles can see me easily, and (2) a vehicle in front of me can notice me easily in their side and/or rear view mirror.

When approaching an intersection where vehicles are waiting to turn, I may move back and forth between left to right tracks to increase the possibility of being seen by the turning vehicles.
 

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I have always been told to stay in the track area of the car tires, and stay on the left track when possable, that way cars will not be tempted to cut you off by not going around you in the full lane next to you. Some cages will pass you and not pull completely over to the other lane when they are in a hurry.
 

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I'm usually in the left portion of the lane. I stay out of the "left track" of the lane in the rain since that's that were all the water tends to accumulate... especially on blacktop roads, thus making the conditions good for hydroplaning.

I think somebody mentioned it above too... but I tend to stay out of the middle of the lane since that's where all the oils and crap from the caged vehicles accumulate. In Texas... if it rains just a bit, then it brings those oils and fluids to the surface making the center of the road akin to an ice rink. ;)

Bob
 

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From my MSF training, I recollect that the lane is broken down into 3 tracks: left, center, & right. The recommendation is to ride in the left or right track because the center track is where most of the oil builds up, and thus possible loss of traction could occur, especially when it rains.

Personally, I like to ride the left track of a lane so that: (1) on-coming vehicles can see me easily, and (2) a vehicle in front of me can notice me easily in their side and/or rear view mirror.

When approaching an intersection where vehicles are waiting to turn, I may move back and forth between left to right tracks to increase the possibility of being seen by the turning vehicles.
that's pretty much my approach as well. I also might move to the right side when semis are passing (opposite direction) at highway speed. And, I avoid the middle not just because of oil build up, but also because tire puncturing debris can build up there.
 

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Left. On a curvy road, I might move to the right when needed to use a little extra space to my advantage.
 

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"..avoid the center portion because that is where the oil, coolant, and other bad stuff tends to be." Yup.

My dad told me a long time ago to ride in the part of the lane most likely to be seen. To me that was, on a two lane, in the left part of the lane. I always try to avoid the center portion because that is where the oil, coolant, and other bad stuff tends to be.
 

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The only time I take the center lane is when stopped at an intersection to avoid cages trying to squeeze in one side or the other in an attempt to take my lane. I get as far left as possible on city streets so people on the right can see me before they try to pull out. I'll move more to the right for Left Turn Louie.
 

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Which ever part has the least potholes, patches, and grooves.
Don't care to two abreast but have done it - SLOWLY. :shrug:

If road is smooth and straight, or fairly so, I ride just right of white line when in right lane, just left of white line on 4 lane and I'm in left lane. All of the lane when in middle lane of 6 or more lane highway.

My attitude is "This is my lane and I want as much "get away from the blind squirrel in the cage" room as I can find." :doorag:
 

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"..avoid the center portion because that is where the oil, coolant, and other bad stuff tends to be." Yup.
100% true back in the days of road draft, but that isn't always true today. Transverse mounted engines and transmissions leak in other places than the center, and wheel bearings spray out a lot of grease when they fail. Stoplights are the trickiest, and I have learned to give plenty of room in front so that I can observe the actual conditions.

Times (and vehicles) do change. Around here, at least once a month someone sprays their crankcase over about a four mile strip. It hardly every stays in the middle of the lane.
 

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100% true back in the days of road draft, but that isn't always true today. Transverse mounted engines and transmissions leak in other places than the center, and wheel bearings spray out a lot of grease when they fail. Stoplights are the trickiest, and I have learned to give plenty of room in front so that I can observe the actual conditions.

Times (and vehicles) do change. Around here, at least once a month someone sprays their crankcase over about a four mile strip. It hardly every stays in the middle of the lane.
While your statements of locations of leaking items on vehicles is true and has been basically since the first modern day FWD(1966 OLDS TORONADO)was intro'd, the center of the lane is still where these deposits are most prevalent, along w/lost bolts, screws, nails, etc. since the majority of the road users are 4 wheeled on up and those tires run to the Left and Right of the center of the lane, they tend to keep those areas dried up and object free.
It would take a bit longer to dry up the left and right tire track areas from a completely emptied crank case-can't remember the last time I have seen that.
 

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I was instructed to vary back and forth between the left track and the right track of a specific lane. He said it serves a couple purposes. If you vary your position you will only have a 50/50 chance of being closest to a car that moves in on you from your left or right. You have a better chance of being seen in rear view mirrors if you move back and forth which always keeps the cagers looking for you. And it's fun to not sit in the same place all the time. I have found that when I approach an intersection I usually get in the left track because that will give the oncoming left turn drivers the best view of me and vice versa. Seems to have worked out for me so far.
 

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Use that portion of the right or left, not center, part of the lane that gives you the best combination of safety and ability to scan the road ahead. Riding two abreast, or even closely staggered, is the mark of amateur riders/poseurs.
 
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