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People have been saying MT was going away since 2018..here it is 2022 and its still here...43% of sales is still a big chunk of Gold Wings and honestly I've seen more 6 speeds on the road than the DCT over the last 4 seasons...it would be a shame if Honda went that way though..alot of people would go to BMW..I would most likely go with a RT if that happened and I was looking for a new machine. I almost bought one in 2018 til Honda came out with this newest wing.
And why is Porsche bringing back manual trannies in their 911s, GT3s, etc. There is customer demand.
 

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A couple of observations. I test rode the manual, DCT, and a 2018 Spyder RT on the same day after spending the previous 8 years on a BMW R1150GSA. The Spyder RT and the R1150GSA both had a commonality - side gusts of wind and 18 wheelers would blow them all over the road. The Wing stayed planted in those situations. That quality alone made me want one. The manual versions shifter did not like my 11 1/2 boots - could not get comfortable at all with the ergonomics during the test ride.
My 2018 came from the factory with the foot shifter set too low for my boots..it's easy to adjust the shifter to the correct height..maybe 15 minutes to adjust the shifter to the correct height for me.
 

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My 2018 came from the factory with the foot shifter set too low for my boots..it's easy to adjust the shifter to the correct height..maybe 15 minutes to adjust the shifter to the correct height for me.
That is something I figured out later during my "seconds thoughts phase" before I became acclimated to DCT. When I mentioned to the sales guy how the shifter did not fit my foot he should have got service out to make the adjustment. At least that way manual would have had a fairer shake.
 

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2019 Darkness Black Goldwing DCT (1800BD)
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And why is Porsche bringing back manual trannies in their 911s, GT3s, etc. There is customer demand.
As far as I know, Porsche never dropped MTs. But DCTs/autos outsell their MTs. Corvette dropped it, as did Ferrari and Lamborghini - all are DCT based only. Porsche's been the lone hold-out.
 

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Do what works best for you......
The DCT takes some getting used to as it is quite different.

When I first test rode a DCT Goldwing after the first 5-minutes I said......."NO way" this is not for me at all.
Just feels weird not being in control of the shifting and felt sort of awkward.
Luckily I rode a DCT at several dealers and probably had 3 - 4 hours saddle time........as I got more used it, it turned from awkward into fun.
I went for it and never ever regretted the DCT choice.........2018+ MT is nice also as I've rode that several times but I've ridden MT bikes for 45-years and wanted something different.

Now with my new 2022 purchase and going to a trike, the DCT is the perfect transmission for a trike IMHO.

btw - the fwd/rev walking modes on the DCT are a sweet addition and works very well.
I live in the San Francisco area, I was afraid of the DCT, but I hated my manual shift bikes.... near disaster every other month bike rolling backwards at intersections. So I absolutely committed whatever the trade-offs were I needed an automatic transmission. So I bought the DCT. I was like you at first there does not seem to be enough instant feedback. I was saying I might have made the wrong decision. However like most pieces of machinery you just learn how to use it it within its range of capabilities. It Is a learning curve.
The way I started thinking about it was, I no longer have to use the technique of feathering the clutch and being gentle or hard with the clutch. I now have to learn the new skill of making the bike do what I want it to do, with the throttle control. First and 2nd gear is a skill set. 3rd 4th and 5th gear is also a skill set. Certain situations demand feathering of the throttle so the liftoff is gentle. Other situations require bringing the hammer down. It has become so transparent I simply make the bike do what I want, or what is needed with the trigger, choose the gear... Feather the throttle to get rid of lag as needed. Stopping on hilly terrain has been a miracle, I feel so happy on the bike it actually feels like a new level of relief and a new level of control, new level of safety for me. I even use the hill assist with the DCT for subtle rollback control. I find myself 99% of the time in sport mode the levels of control feels better than any bike I have ever owned, After I learned it. I feel like I have no uncertainty with the controls just like all the other bikes I have had after 100 hours on the bike. New technology I think is always like that it enables subtle new ways of operating with slight changes to the old ways. The trade-offs absolutely worth it in my case. Learning new skills is fun, and keeps you young.
So I went from up small sense of regret to absolutely feeling like a genius....like whew! I made the right decision after all. Zero regret.
Cheers
 

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I live in the San Francisco area, I was afraid of the DCT, but I hated my manual shift bikes.... near disaster every other month bike rolling backwards at intersections. So I absolutely committed whatever the trade-offs were I needed an automatic transmission. So I bought the DCT. I was like you at first there does not seem to be enough instant feedback. I was saying I might have made the wrong decision. However like most pieces of machinery you just learn how to use it it within its range of capabilities. It Is a learning curve.
The way I started thinking about it was, I no longer have to use the technique of feathering the clutch and being gentle or hard with the clutch. I now have to learn the new skill of making the bike do what I want it to do, with the throttle control. First and 2nd gear is a skill set. 3rd 4th and 5th gear is also a skill set. Certain situations demand feathering of the throttle so the liftoff is gentle. Other situations require bringing the hammer down. It has become so transparent I simply make the bike do what I want, or what is needed with the trigger, choose the gear... Feather the throttle to get rid of lag as needed. Stopping on hilly terrain has been a miracle, I feel so happy on the bike it actually feels like a new level of relief and a new level of control, new level of safety for me. I even use the hill assist with the DCT for subtle rollback control. I find myself 99% of the time in sport mode the levels of control feels better than any bike I have ever owned, After I learned it. I feel like I have no uncertainty with the controls just like all the other bikes I have had after 100 hours on the bike. New technology I think is always like that it enables subtle new ways of operating with slight changes to the old ways. The trade-offs absolutely worth it in my case. Learning new skills is fun, and keeps you young.
So I went from up small sense of regret to absolutely feeling like a genius....like whew! I made the right decision after all. Zero regret.
Cheers
Pretty much my experience, but I don't feel the hesitation a couple of people have mentioned.
 

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I live in the San Francisco area, I was afraid of the DCT, but I hated my manual shift bikes.... near disaster every other month bike rolling backwards at intersections. So I absolutely committed whatever the trade-offs were I needed an automatic transmission. So I bought the DCT. I was like you at first there does not seem to be enough instant feedback. I was saying I might have made the wrong decision. However like most pieces of machinery you just learn how to use it it within its range of capabilities. It Is a learning curve.
The way I started thinking about it was, I no longer have to use the technique of feathering the clutch and being gentle or hard with the clutch. I now have to learn the new skill of making the bike do what I want it to do, with the throttle control. First and 2nd gear is a skill set. 3rd 4th and 5th gear is also a skill set. Certain situations demand feathering of the throttle so the liftoff is gentle. Other situations require bringing the hammer down. It has become so transparent I simply make the bike do what I want, or what is needed with the trigger, choose the gear... Feather the throttle to get rid of lag as needed. Stopping on hilly terrain has been a miracle, I feel so happy on the bike it actually feels like a new level of relief and a new level of control, new level of safety for me. I even use the hill assist with the DCT for subtle rollback control. I find myself 99% of the time in sport mode the levels of control feels better than any bike I have ever owned, After I learned it. I feel like I have no uncertainty with the controls just like all the other bikes I have had after 100 hours on the bike. New technology I think is always like that it enables subtle new ways of operating with slight changes to the old ways. The trade-offs absolutely worth it in my case. Learning new skills is fun, and keeps you young.
So I went from up small sense of regret to absolutely feeling like a genius....like whew! I made the right decision after all. Zero regret.
Cheers
Very nice write up……..
Learning curve with new technology, once learned it’s a beautiful fun to ride machine.
Honda needs to allow much longer test rides on the DCT models, I bet they would sell a lot more of them.

Thanks for your experiences……
 
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Hello,

I test rode a 2020 GW Tour with DCT today for about 40 miles and found the experience interesting, but now I am not totally convinced the DCT is for me. The ride was broken into three rides - one for about 10 miles to get use to the bike and how it acted with just me. The second with my wife for about 20 miles and then a final 10 mile ride by myself again.

Observations:

When riding the bike in auto Tour mode it feels like the bike wants to get you into the highest gear possible as quick as possible and as such feels like the bike lacks power for like a second after the shift - almost like it is lugging the engine to a small degree. I have a Ram 2500 Cummins and this is how the 68RE tranny feels too - shifts too soon for fuel economy. Putting my truck in tow-haul helps how it shifts.

When riding the bike in manual sport mode it's definitely feels faster and more aggressive, but still has the same sensation of feeling like a lack of power for about a second after I shift. I am probably not explaining it right but that is how it feels to me.

I have a 15 Honda Valkyrie and it feels much much much faster to me as it is manual and also weighs significantly less so that is clearly a factor. However I think the benefit of a manual tranny is that once you shift the gear and it's in the new gear you don't feel that temporary "lugging" sensation for a split second I described above.

After riding the DCT I feel like it's clear to me that the 6 speed manual tranny version would give me much more control over the power band and it would feel "sportier" as I would instantly have that power feel after the shift which I feel doesn't exist with the DCT.

Call me crazy but this is just how I feel after riding the DCT and wish I could have ridden it more but happy to have ridden it. I am going to try to ride a DCT again to see how I feel riding another time. I do love the feel and ride of the sixth generation wing and felt very comfortable as a solo rider or with my wife on back. I had a 2012 Goldwing and it felt much more top heavy and made me uneasy and I feel very comfortable on the new generation riding alone or with a passenger. It definitely feels smaller and by the end of my ride I was very comfortable.

i have a deposit on a 2022 DCT, but might need to switch to a 6 MT.

Thanks!
Hi from Woodstock (we're almost neighbors). I rode the GW DCT twice at the IMS. Honda did not bring any manual transmission Gold Wings. It's an amazing technology and I was quite impressed (coming to a stop is kinda eerie). I had the most fun in Sport mode and I thought the bike handled great. I would have liked to have tried a Africa Twin DCT, but Honda didn't bring any of those either.

Last time I visited Southern Honda, they had some manual shift GWs. Give 'em a call and see if they have one you can ride.
 

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Hello,

I test rode a 2020 GW Tour with DCT today for about 40 miles and found the experience interesting, but now I am not totally convinced the DCT is for me. The ride was broken into three rides - one for about 10 miles to get use to the bike and how it acted with just me. The second with my wife for about 20 miles and then a final 10 mile ride by myself again.

Observations:

When riding the bike in auto Tour mode it feels like the bike wants to get you into the highest gear possible as quick as possible and as such feels like the bike lacks power for like a second after the shift - almost like it is lugging the engine to a small degree. I have a Ram 2500 Cummins and this is how the 68RE tranny feels too - shifts too soon for fuel economy. Putting my truck in tow-haul helps how it shifts.

When riding the bike in manual sport mode it's definitely feels faster and more aggressive, but still has the same sensation of feeling like a lack of power for about a second after I shift. I am probably not explaining it right but that is how it feels to me.

I have a 15 Honda Valkyrie and it feels much much much faster to me as it is manual and also weighs significantly less so that is clearly a factor. However I think the benefit of a manual tranny is that once you shift the gear and it's in the new gear you don't feel that temporary "lugging" sensation for a split second I described above.

After riding the DCT I feel like it's clear to me that the 6 speed manual tranny version would give me much more control over the power band and it would feel "sportier" as I would instantly have that power feel after the shift which I feel doesn't exist with the DCT.

Call me crazy but this is just how I feel after riding the DCT and wish I could have ridden it more but happy to have ridden it. I am going to try to ride a DCT again to see how I feel riding another time. I do love the feel and ride of the sixth generation wing and felt very comfortable as a solo rider or with my wife on back. I had a 2012 Goldwing and it felt much more top heavy and made me uneasy and I feel very comfortable on the new generation riding alone or with a passenger. It definitely feels smaller and by the end of my ride I was very comfortable.

i have a deposit on a 2022 DCT, but might need to switch to a 6 MT.

Thanks!
I went up to the top of pike’s peak and returned as well as the same for Mount Evens with my 2021 DCT Tour. I never had to worry about shifting gear. Riding up or riding down the bike was always in the right gear and gave me the confidence that it’s doing fine.
This bike does not lack power.
The DCT in Tour mode learns your style and shifts differently if you take off somewhat faster. I don’t mess with the manual option of the DCT and choose a different mode to let the bike do it’s job. It has yet to disappoint me. Make sure after you buy a manual one you are not going to wish you had decided otherwise.
 

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You couldn't have described it any better, my wife has a 2018 GL1800 DCT trike and I have a 2018 GL1800 manual Trans, I ride to aggressive for the DCT and it's not for me, but you're right ON!
My wife rode a manual trike for years, but when she went to purchase her new trike, I talked her into a DCT trike, she's still adjusting but have her moments.
DCT not for me...........
 

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You couldn't have described it any better, my wife has a 2018 GL1800 DCT trike and I have a 2018 GL1800 manual Trans, I ride to aggressive for the DCT and it's not for me, but you're right ON!
My wife rode a manual trike for years, but when she went to purchase her new trike, I talked her into a DCT trike, she's still adjusting but have her moments.
DCT not for me...........
Nope…. Unpossible. :giggle:

A DCT bike loves to be ridden aggressively and because of the instantaneous shifting is a quicker bike in any situation regardless of the skill of the rider. Sorry fellas, that is just the truth.
 

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My 2018 came from the factory with the foot shifter set too low for my boots..it's easy to adjust the shifter to the correct height..maybe 15 minutes to adjust the shifter to the correct height for me.
My wife has a 2020 Spyder RT. Side gust are the same as with the Wing--manageable
 

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I normally ride my DCT in Tour mode and just use the paddle shifters if I feel the need to shift. DCT does a really good job deciding what gear to put in most times. But it cannot see the road to know if maybe downshifting would be a good idea. So I just hit the paddle shifter. If riding the hilly, twisty roads I usually use Sport mode and it does a good job holding the gears. Again, use paddle shifters on the few instances where I want to change gears up or down before the DCT decides to do so. So for me, the DCT just works. But only you can decide what works for you.
 

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I've seen 100's of these conversations and they all go the same way. It's like asking what is the best oil to use. Everyone has their own opinion and only you know what you like and how you like it. Every new concept comes with resistance, I remember when they stopped putting on kick starters.. Oh man everyone was afraid what would happen if the battery dies. I remember when they started putting automatics in Japanese cars and everyone lost their minds, didn't trust them, they broke all the time and now can't find a manual stick and if you do no one today could drive one. I have a DCT and it took weeks before I started getting muscle memory and it becomes second nature to you. Heck I still can't find the horn button when I want it and it’s been 2yrs. The future is DCT in everything, it's in all exotic cars with Paddle shifters for quite a while now, it's the fastest in all racing and the smoothest you can get in any Car, Truck, and now motorcycles And for those who still want to hang on to their rotary wall phones God Speed My Friend, (whatever makes you smile)
 

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I live in the San Francisco area, I was afraid of the DCT, but I hated my manual shift bikes.... near disaster every other month bike rolling backwards at intersections. So I absolutely committed whatever the trade-offs were I needed an automatic transmission. So I bought the DCT. I was like you at first there does not seem to be enough instant feedback. I was saying I might have made the wrong decision. However like most pieces of machinery you just learn how to use it it within its range of capabilities. It Is a learning curve.
The way I started thinking about it was, I no longer have to use the technique of feathering the clutch and being gentle or hard with the clutch. I now have to learn the new skill of making the bike do what I want it to do, with the throttle control. First and 2nd gear is a skill set. 3rd 4th and 5th gear is also a skill set. Certain situations demand feathering of the throttle so the liftoff is gentle. Other situations require bringing the hammer down. It has become so transparent I simply make the bike do what I want, or what is needed with the trigger, choose the gear... Feather the throttle to get rid of lag as needed. Stopping on hilly terrain has been a miracle, I feel so happy on the bike it actually feels like a new level of relief and a new level of control, new level of safety for me. I even use the hill assist with the DCT for subtle rollback control. I find myself 99% of the time in sport mode the levels of control feels better than any bike I have ever owned, After I learned it. I feel like I have no uncertainty with the controls just like all the other bikes I have had after 100 hours on the bike. New technology I think is always like that it enables subtle new ways of operating with slight changes to the old ways. The trade-offs absolutely worth it in my case. Learning new skills is fun, and keeps you young.
So I went from up small sense of regret to absolutely feeling like a genius....like whew! I made the right decision after all. Zero regret.
Cheers
That's a great perspective toward change and learning
 

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I've seen 100's of these conversations and they all go the same way. It's like asking what is the best oil to use. Everyone has their own opinion and only you know what you like and how you like it. Every new concept comes with resistance, I remember when they stopped putting on kick starters.. Oh man everyone was afraid what would happen if the battery dies. I remember when they started putting automatics in Japanese cars and everyone lost their minds, didn't trust them, they broke all the time and now can't find a manual stick and if you do no one today could drive one. I have a DCT and it took weeks before I started getting muscle memory and it becomes second nature to you. Heck I still can't find the horn button when I want it and it’s been 2yrs. The future is DCT in everything, it's in all exotic cars with Paddle shifters for quite a while now, it's the fastest in all racing and the smoothest you can get in any Car, Truck, and now motorcycles And for those who still want to hang on to their rotary wall phones God Speed My Friend, (whatever makes you smile)
Zmanou812, I definitely see your point. In Europe, it's hard to find an automatic transmission car or truck (especially a rental), so I'm curious how the DCT sells in the Old World.

I've driven manuals since I was 16 (I'm 66 now) and I enjoy it. However when I moved to Atlanta in the mid-80s, in Atlanta traffic, it's masochistic. It's been automatics ever since (until I rent a car in Europe).

I was disappointed Honda did not bring a manual GW at the IMS. I like to shift and I would have liked to compare the bikes back-to-back.

BTW, I remember rotary, seven digit dialing, and party lines 😇
 
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