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I'm new to the Goldwings, got my first bike in 2009 which was a 1500. Rode it up to May of this year and sold it for my 1800. I had Bridgestones on my 1500 then went to E3's, kinda of like the stones better for the ride. Now I got my 1800 which was used from a dealer and they could not tell me nothing about the age of the tires. When I picked it up it had Bridgestones 60 series on it and again I didn't have any problems with them. I live in the Desert in SE California near the Arizona border and our temps get up into the 115 to 120 in the summer. I have to ride over 100 miles just for our chapter meetings and I get concerned about the heat on the tires to the point I just don't want to go out riding in the summer. Thought about replacing the tires, picked up a set of Bridgestones on sale had them shipped to me. Now after reading about some of the tire blow outs with Bridgestones and they think it may be heat related has got me really spooked!! Would really like to try a CT but I'm concerned about the handling, how much does it change the way the bike tracks and turns. One guy in our chapter said he tried a car tire and didn't like the way it felt when turning, I guess he described it as it jerked over suddenly on him and he didn't like that. Now I got to worry about someone changing my tire and tearing the bead and not knowing it and now it will blow out sometime down the road while I'm doing 75mph. I'm 48 years old and really wasn't planning to go out this way! Can someone enlighten me!

Thanks!
Bill...
 

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Bill,

IMO, the safest tire you will find will be one of the run-flat designs (i.e., Pirelli [email protected] or the Kumho ECSTA (KU31). The primary reason I say this is because a run-flat allows one to ride the bike with no air in the tire. In the event of a blowout, you should not have any trouble bringing the bike to a stop without issue.

For the difference in handling, it is not that big of a deal and you will probably adjust to it very quickly. It is rare to find people that try a CT and not like it (only a couple of folks I know of).

There are a number of Darksiders in AZ & CA. Perhaps one of them will let you ride their CT-equipped wing. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Bill,

IMO, the safest tire you will find will be one of the run-flat designs (i.e., Pirelli [email protected] or the Kumho ECSTA (KU31).

I heard of the Kumho tires, how much will my RPM change from my MT? I'm really don't want to put a 205 on my bike just to keep the RPM's within stock range. Will the Kumho work with my Doran TPMS and Centramatics?

Thanks for the reply!
 

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I heard of the Kumho tires, how much will my RPM change from my MT? I'm really don't want to put a 205 on my bike just to keep the RPM's within stock range. Will the Kumho work with my Doran TPMS and Centramatics?

Thanks for the reply!
Using the 195/55-16 size, which is the most popular size and very close to the OEM, your RPMs will drop a very small amount. Your Doran and Centramatics should work with any of the CTs.
 

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I proceeded to ride the Dragon with the wife on board within my first 500 miles on a CT. It does handle "differently" in turns, but doesn't "jerk". Still, if you are worried about so many things, perhaps you should reconsider motorcycle riding?
 

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Car tire will run cooler but I don't think you will have any issues with the MT if you keep your pressures within range. The MT is a run flat as far as I'm concerned.
 

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Car tire will run cooler but I don't think you will have any issues with the MT if you keep your pressures within range. The MT is a run flat as far as I'm concerned.
Can you ride the MT-equipped bike, at highway speeds, without the valve core? You can do that with a run-flat CT....even take it through the twisties.
 

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post #7---Bull$heeeet! That mc tire will stop you within a few feet of going flat! And you will be lucky if it doesn't throw you off the bike in the process! Or at least cause some serious butt puckering!!!!

To the OP: by all means get one of the car tires; like a previous poster said-- I've only heard of a very, very few people who did not like the car tire on their bike. And I think they just did not give enough time to adjust to the MINOR difference in the handling characteristics of the bike.
 

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I didn't mean to start a fire storm with that comment. But yes, I have ridden the MT flat. It's very stiff. You can pull the valve core completely out of the front tire and it barely compresses. It's not as good as a run flat I'm sure although I haven't tried a run flat yet. I'm sticking with the NRF. But the MT has A very stiff side wall. Thats really all im saying. Thats why they ride so crappy. If you mount your own tires, you will become very familiar with that. I didn't mean to say it is a true run flat.
 

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I didn't mean to start a fire storm with that comment. But yes, I have ridden the MT flat. It's very stiff. You can pull the valve core completely out of the front tire and it barely compresses. It's not as good as a run flat I'm sure although I haven't tried a run flat yet. I'm sticking with the NRF. But the MT has A very stiff side wall. Thats really all im saying. Thats why they ride so crappy. If you mount your own tires, you will become very familiar with that. I didn't mean to say it is a true run flat.
This is true until it quickly becomes hot than a while later starting to break down to little chucks of hot rubber debris. Yes you can ride a g1800 front & rear tire a ways but no where near the miles a Runflat can safely . And. Bit spooky at best . Now a Runflat most will never know it's flat till they slow down and make a corner:thumbup:
 

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I didn't mean to start a fire storm with that comment. But yes, I have ridden the MT flat. It's very stiff. You can pull the valve core completely out of the front tire and it barely compresses. It's not as good as a run flat I'm sure although I haven't tried a run flat yet. I'm sticking with the NRF. But the MT has A very stiff side wall. Thats really all im saying. Thats why they ride so crappy. If you mount your own tires, you will become very familiar with that. I didn't mean to say it is a true run flat.
Thanks for clarifying TT. No firestorm here. I ride both RF & NRF. Just wanted to point out that there is a difference. We have a lot of new folks joining the DS, and some couldn't tell the difference if the bike had an MT or a CT without someone telling them.
 

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I'm a recent convert to a C/T, as the member that posted below me will attest to, and for my style of riding it is the best tire I have had on my bike. Once the " psychological apprehensions " disappear you might wonder why a C/T is not a stock tire on a Wing. Superb ride and handling for me. " Spooked " is the key word here and a feeling not to be taken lightly. There has to be a trust between the rider and the machine. I only have about 2,000 miles on my Kuhmo Run-fllat and I can say the first thousand miles were filled with apprehensions: " If I leaned too far was the tire going to tip over ??? " etc. Well nothing happened and eventually I took corners more aggressively as my trust factor increased. The C/T has actually made me a better slow maneuver rider with its larger footprint. Slow stops are more stable for me, especially riding two up and the quietness of the highway ride is second to none.
 

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First: Welcome to the Insanity!!
Second: Learn to read the manufacture date on a tire. It ain't hard and you don't have to rely on someone else.
Third: Take the stories here with a grain of salt. If you don't know the person it can be difficult to tell the tire problems from the upkeep problems. Some think checking tir pressure every 3 months just like clockwork is an acceptable practice.
Fourth: If you want to try Darksiding, by all means give it a whirl. Choose a tire with a beefy sidewall in the NRF or a RF. Properly air them up and go. Murgie has a list of the more popular tires, or decide for yourself by reading the DS forums.
Yes they feel a little different than a MC tire. Some don't notice it much and some can't get over it, so it is an individual thing.
:congrats: On the new(ish) Wing.

Cheers
 

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I think the MT is somewhere between the full on run flat and the non run flat in sidewall rigidity. That's what I'm saying. It will support you very well long enough to stop and do what ever you are going to do.

Regarding CT vs MT, the CT runs cooler and grips just as well or even better some say. I can't make a judgement because I don't ride that hard. But, I've never had any negative experiences in a hard lean with the CT. This will cause controversy; From what I've seen of the RF's with extended milage and road hard in the twisties. There is a point where they just come apart. It's not necessarily a problem because it's a run flat.

A non run flat road under the same conditions as above will show the cord before they come apart thus giving you some warning, assuming you look at your tires once in a while.

This all leads me to believe that the car tire is best suited for the highway than the twisties. From what I've seen the edges of the square tire wear out first in the twisties, unlike the MT.

Just my opinion based on pictures posted on this forum, not personal experience.
 

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I'm new to the Goldwings.... Can someone enlighten me!

Thanks!
Bill...
Relax Bill, there actually very few tire incidents where someone actually gets hurt...the stories on this board are pretty much "I had a blowout.....got her stopped....don't want that again."
I'm riding on a Stone front and a Pirelli rf rear.....but I believe replacing tires at the proper time, or earlier is the first thing in avoiding problems. Checking my tires for proper inflation, and visual inspection for extreme uneven wear, buldging or nails/screws is the second thing.
Riding a motorcycle is dangerous...well maintained equipment lessens the danger.
 

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Relax Bill, there actually very few tire incidents where someone actually gets hurt...the stories on this board are pretty much "I had a blowout.....got her stopped....don't want that again."
I'm riding on a Stone front and a Pirelli rf rear.....but I believe replacing tires at the proper time, or earlier is the first thing in avoiding problems. Checking my tires for proper inflation, and visual inspection for extreme uneven wear, buldging or nails/screws is the second thing.
Riding a motorcycle is dangerous...well maintained equipment lessens the danger.
Totally agree.
 

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709 on the front, Kumho on the rear for me. Love it, don't have the same concerns I had before of the rear slipping on me in the twisties, and love the run-flat safety margin. Still have a issue with slippies on the tar strips with the front, but the rear is good.

Haven't seen any postings of major damage to a CT in the forum, have seen many a posting on MT damage though.

There's enough Darksiders out there to get an opinion from, and hopefully some from near where you are will shout out and let you go see what it's all about.
 

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Congrats on your new bike! As has been mentioned before, the only sure way to know if a CT is for you is to ride on one and experience it for yourself, whether that is a borrowed bike or putting a CT on your bike. Best wishes and happy riding with whatever you chose. :thumbup:
 

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I heard of the Kumho tires, how much will my RPM change from my MT? I'm really don't want to put a 205 on my bike just to keep the RPM's within stock range. Will the Kumho work with my Doran TPMS and Centramatics? Thanks for the reply!
I run the Kumho with Centramatics and the Doran TPMS and their is no change to RPM or MPG. What you will notice is:

- a smoother ride
- better handling in the rain
- a higher weight load allowance
- Run-flat safety
- More stability at slow speeds
- alot higher mileage before replacement

What's not to like about it! Good luck with your choice! :thumbup:
 
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