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I'm not new to DS tires. Ran one around 10,000 miles on my old bike. I'm soon going to the DS tire on my 07 Wing. I've been curious about the run flats and have been doing some research. You know, how they are made, how they seal etc.....I've come across some info that seems very important to me seeing as how my wife and I take road trips in the summer and could make a difference. It seems that the Run Flat is NOT a put it on and forget it tire......Read the following and decide for yourself. I've emphasaized some areas I feel could make a difference to us. I didn't include the 3rd type of Run Flat since they don't apply to our use.

Let me say that I'm NOT preaching here.....just posting something that seems to be important and could save someone grief and pain in the future.


"Today there are three technologies used as Original Equipment on vehicles to help maintain vehicle mobility when a tire is punctured. They are self-sealing tires, self-supporting tires and tires supported by an auxiliary system.

Self-Sealing Tires:

Self-sealing tires are designed to fix most tread-area punctures instantly and permanently. These tires feature standard tire construction with the exception of an extra lining inside the tire under the tread area that's coated with a puncture sealant that can permanently seal most punctures from nails, bolts or screws up to 3/16 of an inch in diameter. These tires first provide a seal around the object when the tire is punctured and then fill in the hole in the tread when the object is removed. Because these tires are designed to seal the tire immediately upon being punctured, most drivers will never even know that they just had a puncture. Also because these tires feature standard tire constructions, the traditional loss-of-air symptoms that accompany a flat tire remain to warn the driver if the tire is damaged beyond repair. Therefore, self-sealing tires do not require a low air pressure warning system. Example: Continental ContiSeal.

Self-Supporting

Self-supporting tires feature a stiffer internal construction, which is capable of temporarily carrying the weight of the vehicle, even after the tire has lost all air pressure. To provide "self-supporting" capability, these tires typically attach rubber inserts next to or between layers of heat-resistant cord in their sidewalls to help prevent breaking the reinforcing cords in the event of loss of air pressure. They also feature specialized beads that allow the tire to firmly grip current Original Equipment and aftermarket wheels even in the event of air loss. Because self-supporting tires are so good at masking the traditional loss-of-air symptoms that accompany a flat tire, they require a tire pressure monitoring system to alert the driver that they have lost air pressure. Without such a system, the driver may not notice underinflation and may inadvertently cause additional tire damage by failing to inflate or repair the tire at the first opportunity. Typically, self-supporting tires maintain vehicle mobility for 50 miles at speeds up to 55 mph.

Examples: Bridgestone RFT (Run Flat Tire), Dunlop DSST (Dunlop Self-Supporting Technology), Firestone RFT (Run Flat Tire), Goodyear EMT (Extended Mobility Technology), Kumho XRP, Michelin ZP (Zero Pressure), Pirelli RFT (Run Flat Technology) and Yokohama Run Flat.
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The second type seems to be the prevalent tire type I've seen posted here. It seems to me that a vigilant and very frequent inspection would be required with these tires for the reasons noted in the article to ensure tire integrity at all times. I've also learned that the Run Flats are for punctures less than 3/16 or so diameter.

I've had nail punctures on bikes with regular tires in the past of this size and they seem to cause a slow leak rather than a blowout. I always check tire pressure with a gauge before each ride (embedded in my mind from safety courses every 3 years....;)) and visually during rides when fueling up. In the past, I've easily patched these punctures with a the sticky tubeless type patch kits found at any auto supply and my trusty mini air compressor in about 10 minutes without taking the tire off of the bike. I then replace the tire at the next opportunity.....something I'd do even with a run flat.

My thinking here is that the run flat tire could mask the problem of a puncture and of someone using them without knowing the above info, not performing inspections and having that tire fail causing them to have an accident. I'm not saying the Run Flat is not a safer tire, just that they can't be installed and ignored due to complete trust the run flat feature.

At any rate, I felt compelled to share this with ya'll just in case someone has not considered this information. Please take it in that spirit :thumbup:

Cheers and Ride Safe!!!

Randall
 

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Randall,

Good info. I have the Khumo and run the SmarTire system. I had this before the CT as I believe in the pressure/temp monitoring of all tires.
 

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I make sure I also do a routine check of my tires. Ensuring air pressure and not finding foreign objects in the tires goes a long way in preventing surprises. With that said, the self supporting tires does something else the self sealing tires don't and that is how it affects the bike handles. This is just me but I like how the bike feels in the corners better with a self supporting tire than a non run flat. I am only comparing a Toyo to the Pirelli here but there was a big difference to me in my confidence of these tires. As with all things in life, there is always a trade off of what ever we decide to use.
 

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thanks for the info. I also keep a close eye on pressures and check them before each ride. Also thinking about an onboard pressure system....I think any motorcycle rider should do this whether he has a MT or CT on the bike. Your whole life is resting on 2 wheels....take good care of them!
 

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Great info and advice from all above, many thanks.

John
 

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I rarely ever check the CT. When I do it is always where it was the check before. Front is different. I check it often as it needs more attention. Run flat tires are really designed for a heavier car and the GW is nowhere near the load capacity of the CT. From reports of those who let the air out of their run flats and rode with them, said that they could tell right away that something wasn't right with the rear. But the tires held the bike up and rode good even with no air.
 

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Seems to me that self supporting tires or not.. Bully that the require a TPMS. The require a tire gauge. Seems since I only have 2 tires to live on, checking the pressure is a no brainer.
 

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I do not like gadgets. I would maybe rely on a tire monitor system while running, but as for checking the tire pressure I do it myself, with a good gauge and before every ride.

Sometimes I will check it the night before. I also use two gauges, one one time and another the next time, so if I notice a very substantial discrepancy I can check with the other gauge and throw the defective one away.

Just cause I run a Run Flat , I still keep a very close eye on my tires.

I think most Darksiders do. They are after all the ones more aware of tire situations than most, that is why they are Darksiders.

Kit
 
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