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We used to like riding in all kinds of weather too.
Now being in AZ, I don't like to ride when it is hot, little rain doesn't bother us, but can't beat nice weather for riding.
Everyone has their own preferences.
 

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Nope, it's not just you. We went over Independence Pass in Colorado on our ,04 GL1800 and on the way up it started snowing. We were the only ones on the road, not even a snow plow. On the western side of the pass it was 70 degrees and no need for rain or cold weather gear. One of the best rides we've been on.
 

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Used to enjoy riding in anything. Rode from St. Louis to Clarksville, TN and back for a Patriot Guard escort in January once without heated gear. Being on the edge of life and death in a good downpour invigorated me. Pouring water on my mesh jacket to cool off was refreshing. Then one day I said, this sucks. I understand the attraction to the experience. Now I'm a much fairer weather rider and am good with that.
 

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In all my days there has never been a day that I thought it was too hot to ride. I almost always rode to work in the summer even if rain was predicted, sometimes in the rain. Sometimes it rained & sometimes it didn't but the fair-weather riders at work missed a lot of good riding because they were afraid of a little rain. My neighbors never could understand us leaving on vacation on a bike with a car sitting in the garage. One actually asked how we could see the scenery if we were on a bike.
 

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I can ride and enjoy the trip better than in a cage, I can sleep for 12 hours to rest for a cage trip and the first few hours I am tired, I can work all day and get off work and ride 8 or 900 miles and be well alert never have been able to figure that out, I have road in the rain for 4 or 500 miles enjoyed every mile.
 

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I’m not a masochist. I do NOT like riding in the rain, snow or extremes of temperature. I have and most likely will ride in adverse conditions again. While I tolerate and endure such weather conditions, I don’t enjoy them. There IS a reason my bikes have fairings. How about your Goldwing? Judging by some of the sentiments expressed in this thread, there are a number of folks who seek out uncomfortable weather on unfaired motorcycles with open face helmets, wearing T shirts, shorts and flip flops so as to fully enjoy the experience. Give me a break!
 

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I’m not a masochist. I do NOT like riding in the rain, snow or extremes of temperature. I have and most likely will ride in adverse conditions again. While I tolerate and endure such weather conditions, I don’t enjoy them. There IS a reason my bikes have fairings. How about your Goldwing? Judging by some of the sentiments expressed in this thread, there are a number of folks who seek out uncomfortable weather on unfaired motorcycles with open face helmets, wearing T shirts, shorts and flip flops so as to fully enjoy the experience. Give me a break!
I have a buddy that bought a beautiful Goldwilng and had for a total of 3 weeks. We all went for a ride and it rained on us. His wife MADE him sell it! If you can't take the weather no matter what it is just travel in a car, or stay home and let us that do enjoy riding anytime enjoy ourselves.
 

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I don't know "IF" I enjoy riding in the rain but I do know I also don't "tolerate" when I do. If it is extremely warm then the rain is a welcome shower to lower the humidity and provide a nice cooling for the ride. If I am out riding and it starts to rain it is just a matter of finding some cover, get out the rain gear, put it on, and evaluate the rain/road conditions and decide to either ride on or wait it out. I'm not going to put myself in a hazardous situation where it is difficult to see me from a cage but I'm also not going to be detoured from riding in a "safe" manner. My wife was the same way - we would find covering shelter and put on the rain gear and discuss her comfort level with either hanging out for a while or heading on down the road. We did both - she was a champ and I miss her.
 

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I have a buddy that bought a beautiful Goldwilng and had for a total of 3 weeks. We all went for a ride and it rained on us. His wife MADE him sell it! If you can't take the weather no matter what it is just travel in a car, or stay home and let us that do enjoy riding anytime enjoy ourselves.
My dad had a friend that his wife told him to sale his bike he said it took a week off of riding his bike to decide he was married for ten years when he came back of his ride he told her he sure was going to miss her he gave her the house and left he was 75 @ the time, he said I have had a bike since I was 15 years old, I thank God that my wife would never ask me to make such a decision since she knows the joy of riding and the joy it gives me.
 

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I’m not a masochist. I do NOT like riding in the rain, snow or extremes of temperature. I have and most likely will ride in adverse conditions again. While I tolerate and endure such weather conditions, I don’t enjoy them. There IS a reason my bikes have fairings. How about your Goldwing? Judging by some of the sentiments expressed in this thread, there are a number of folks who seek out uncomfortable weather on unfaired motorcycles with open face helmets, wearing T shirts, shorts and flip flops so as to fully enjoy the experience. Give me a break!
I can't speak for anyone else, but I see a flaw in your assessment. I don't think anyone is saying that they seek out uncomfortable environments. What they're saying ( at least me) is that in spite of those conditions, they would rather be on a motorcycle. There is NEVER a time when you or me can travel on a motorcycle in the comfort or safety that we could in our climate controlled cars, yet you and I choose to take our motorcycles.
 

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I love to ride just as much as the next guy. More than some, less than others. If I am out riding and it starts to rain, pull over and put on the rain gear, then right back at it. If it is raining in the morning? Plenty of other days to throw my leg over the bike. For commuting to work. When wet, extreme cold or hot? I am making payments on a Chevy pick up. That will be used. For pleasure rides? That's just it. Pleasure. To hot or cold, home I will stay and watch football or read in the AC.
 

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I won't go on a local ride when its raining or if it's going to rain..but while on road trips, I don't mind the rain at all..with the proper riding gear the ride in the rain is very enjoyable..when on a road trip I ride everyday regardless of the rain...the only con with riding in the rain for me is the bike gets dirty
 

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The only time I won't ride in the rain is if I'm shopping or running errands. I don't what to have to remove my rain suit etc, shop, and then put it back on.

But..... when you've ridden the second half of the BRP in the rain and fog and you need to hit a grocery store for supplies, I wore everything into the store, shopped and then rode to the hotel and checked-in still in my rain suit. This was in Cherokee, SC last year.
 

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I actually prefer riding in light rain vs blistering sun (welcome to NM). I like the sound of light rain on the helmet. It's kind of like being in a tent with light rain. Extreme heat is the worst.
With that said, I am really disappointed if I have to take the truck vs the bike, anywhere!
I am presently waiting for a cool down to head out to Ohio. Don't need it to be cool, but it makes the trip a lot funner. Whooo- hooo!
Just rambling .....
 

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People who don’t ride just don’t get it.
You are absolutely right. We got rid of our last motorcycle (a Wing) in 2015. When I took my wife on her first ride on this one she told me she had forgot how great it was to see, hear and smell everything outside that you miss riding in a car. Was a Motor Officer for several years, fellow officers couldn't understand why we wanted to ride a motorcycle, especially one we had to "shift gears" on.
 

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I penned these words some 9 years ago when starting out on my journey across the country...

"There's something in the air. No, it's not like the smell of that cattle farm we just passed. But the more I think about it, it's more a feeling than it is a smell. That something in the air is the faint smell of pine, along with that certain feeling that comes at the beginning of any long trip on a bike. It's the smell of the open road, the feeling and the freedom of being at one with nature. Free from the cage and it's stuffy, air conditioned isolation, I was so excited to finally be on my way..."

What a trip it was. I pushed myself to the limit and then some doing back to back 1200 mile days to cross the continent in 48 1/2 hours to earn my entrance into the IBA. It was just something I had to do. From feeling a bit chilled in the mountains of east California and then later on dealing with 12 hours or so crossing the desert in temps reaching 115+, I made my way through the thunderstorms of central Texas, fighting fatigue and being saddle sore most of the way. What a journey, what a challenge, and what a victory it was for me. I'll never forget that ride.
 

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What follow below is not my own words, but I think it covers the subject why we all ride very well. Three different authors provide three different views regarding our passion. This will be new to someone.

Why I Ride
There is cold, and there is cold on a motorcycle. Cold on a motorcycle is like being beaten with cold hammers while being kicked with cold boots, a bone bruising cold. The wind's big hands squeeze the heat out of my body and whisk it away; caught in a cold October rain, the drops don't even feel like water. They feel like shards of bone fallen from the skies of **** to pock my face. I expect to arrive with my cheeks and forehead streaked with blood, but that's just an illusion, just the misery of nerves not designed for highway speeds.

Despite this, it's hard to give up my motorcycle in the fall and I rush to get it on the road again in the spring; lapses of sanity like this are common among motorcyclists. When you let a motorcycle into your life you're changed forever. The letters "MC" are stamped on your driver's license right next to your sex and height as if "motorcycle" was just another of your physical characteristics, or maybe a mental condition.

But when warm weather finally does come around all those cold snaps and rainstorms are paid in full because a motorcycle summer is worth any price. A motorcycle is not just a two-wheeled car; the difference between driving a car and climbing onto a motorcycle is the difference between watching TV and actually living your life. We spend all our time sealed in boxes, and cars are just the rolling boxes that shuffle us languidly from home-box to work-box to store-box and back, the whole time entombed in stale air, temperature regulated, sound insulated, and smelling of carpets.

On a motorcycle I know I'm alive. When I ride, even the familiar seems strange and glorious. The air has weight and substance as I push through it and its touch is as intimate as water to a swimmer. I feel the cool wells of air that pool under trees and the warm spokes of sunlight that fall through them. I can see everything in a sweeping 360 degrees, up, down and around, wider than PanaVision and higher than IMAX and unrestricted by ceiling or dashboard.

Sometimes I even hear music. It's like hearing phantom telephones in the shower or false doorbells when vacuuming; the pattern-loving brain, seeking signals in the noise, raises acoustic ghosts out of the wind's roar. But on a motorcycle I hear whole songs: rock 'n roll, dark orchestras, women's voices, all hidden in the air and released by speed.

At 30 miles an hour and up, smells become uncannily vivid. All the individual tree-smells and flower-smells and grass-smells flit by like chemical notes in a great plant symphony. Sometimes the smells evoke memories so strongly that it's as though the past hangs invisible in the air around me, wanting only the most casual of rumbling time machines to unlock it.

A ride on a summer afternoon can border on the rapturous. The sheer volume and variety of stimuli is like a bath for my nervous system, an electrical massage for my brain, a systems check for my soul. It tears smiles out of me: a minute ago I was dour, depressed, apathetic, numb, but now, on two wheels, big, ragged, smiles flap against the side of my face, billowing out of me like air from a decompressing plane. Transportation is only a secondary function. A motorcycle is a joy machine. It's a machine of wonders, a metal bird, a motorized prosthetic. It's light and dark and shiny and dirty and warm and cold lapping over each other; it's a conduit of grace, it's a catalyst for bonding the gritty and the holy.

Cars lie to us and tell us we're safe, powerful, and in control. The air-conditioning fans murmur empty assurances and whisper, "Sleep, sleep." Motorcycles tell us a more useful truth: we are small and exposed, and probably moving too fast for our own good, but that's no reason not to enjoy every minute of the ride.

Another View

The reasons that people give as to why they ride a motorcycle are as varied as the number of roads there are to ride them on. There are no simple answers to that question and in fact for each motorcyclist it can be a very personal and profoundly deep reason that only resonates within their souls. For those that don't ride I'm sure other passions fuel their souls as strongly but for my passion ... it thrives on "Riding". For me the passion to ride runs deep and has been there since I first rolled on two wheels years and years ago. I ride ... therefore I am (Apologies to Rene Descartes).

I was told by friends and read in books that when I retired I would have to reinvent myself. I guess that is for those that define there existence through what they do for a living all those years. That was never me. Instead riding a motorcycle reinvents me every time I let it stroke my ego while cruising down the open road twisting the throttle. I was literally born to ride. How else can I explain the child like wonderment that each twisted turn feeds my twisted addicted mind as I traverse life's journey on two wheels.

Many ride alone and others ride with others but for me I feel the essence of motorcycle riding comes from the absolute pleasure of the solitude it can provide. Don't get me wrong ... I love people and love meeting them and being around them but I think sometimes I like people the most when they aren't around. Riding a motorcycle not only inherently provides that solitude but can also transport you to places of greater solitude and beauty in a way that makes you feel like your blood is boiling in your veins. Never am I not wide eyed as I sit upon my steel steed challenging life at every turn keenly aware of death's call if not for a quick mind focused on the task at hand ... staying alive.

Maybe it's the adrenaline rush or just the sheer excitement of riding is what continues to bring us back time and time again like a junkie. I have often said I never feel more alive in this world than when I'm riding my motorcycle and that feeling alone continues to bring me back for more and yet more. My life is in motion while rolling along through it. In my opinion, aside from time spent with God, Family, Friends and helping others there is no better way to mark the passage of time in this world than to ride through it and when that time comes to an end we can only hope that whatever is next … involves two wheels

As someone once said, "The secret to life is enjoying the passage of time". Those of us that ride motorcycles are way ahead of you.

Final view
Riding a motorcycle doesn't call to everyone. It carries a level of risk that is an anathema to most. It demands a level of competence, a degree of engagement that is unusual in today's society. Like an old craft, the skills and the wisdom necessary to be successful at it don't come quickly, but emerge slowly, over time. Most people today simply don't have the patience or the inclination to deal with that sort of thing. But for those of us who do, to that tiny minority who are drawn to it, the rewards are immeasurable. For us, riding imbues life itself with color, tinges it with adventure. It connects us to a time when people weren't perhaps quite so shy about how they lived. A time when everything wasn't a careful, exacting calculus of risk and reward. A bolder time when a fear of getting hurt didn't stand as an impenetrable shield to the simple enjoyment of life. So, yeah, those of us who ride are definitely different. But it's a good difference. We carry something that once was common but now is rare. Something of the distilled essence of what got us all here. We're the last wolves, in a land of sheep.
 

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I'm retired and can pick the good weather riding days, unless it's a multi-day trip with Mother-nature and all.
+1.

Today the wife and I spent 9 hrs riding from Cody, thru Yellowstone NP to West Yellowstone (for lunch), and back. Perfect day for it. Tomorrow it's going to be at least 20 degrees colder.
 
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