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Discussion Starter #1
Is it ok or am I asking for trouble if I use jumper cables to jump start my bike, I don't want to fry something in the electrical system but don't know if will be a problem?
 

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Won't bother anything as long as it's the same VOLTAGE as the bike.
 

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If starting from a vehicle (car, truck etc) DO NOT have the vehicle running. That will cause major problems, but from one battery to yours works like a charm. Good Luck.

Ride safely

Crabby Bob
 

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If starting from a vehicle (car, truck etc) DO NOT have the vehicle running. That will cause major problems, but from one battery to yours works like a charm. Good Luck.

Ride safely

Crabby Bob

:agree:

Do not have the car running!
 

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i am just curious as to why you guys say dont have car running i know a jump from the battery is like having that battery in your bike but having the car running is just going to charge your battery, unless you hook it up wrong,the alternator puts out the same as bike
 

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No reason to be worried. The wing is almost like a small car and has a normal 12V battery and charging system. Just make sure to get the cables connected correctly.

Some mentioned to not have the car running and I'm not really sure why. Yes...the alternator on the car might produce more amps than the alternator on the bike. (I say might because the wing alternator is pretty stout and produces more than many cars) but you are hooking up a car battery with 400+ cold cranking amps which will be more than the alternator anyway so unless the car system is messed up and putting out more than 13-14 volts, I don't see any issue. Amps shouldn't hurt your bike, excessive voltage will, but the car shouldn't be producing more than 14 either so as long as the car is operating normally, there shouldn't be an issue.

Having said that....you shouldn't need the car to be running as the bike shouldn't draw much power from the car battery so there's no real reason to leave the car running so I'd probably not have it running since it's not needed and there is a small possibility that something wrong with the car's system could mess up the bike.
 

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Old days - running the other vehicle was a good idea - boosted available voltage from about 10.5 - 11.5 to around 13.8 - 14.2 volts, and if your were jumping another car that had an almost completely discharged battery (say lights left on) it gave a bit of extra ooomph to the dead vehicle, and prevented the good vehicle from having its battery drained.

But alas - in the quest to try and increase mpg, engineers (darn them guys :wink:) have redesigned the alternators on the newer vehicles to only charge if necessary, and do it in a pulse modulated fashion. Having the engine running whilst jumping another vehicle does not so great things to the sensing circuit and confuses it. This in turn does not so nice things to the various components on the jumped vehicle once it starts, and possibly the running vehicle because of the new electronical type systems.

That's the layman's description - I really have no desire to type a long winded one tonight. Point is, the wing's battery is small, you won't kill the donor vehicle by leaving the engine off, you'll protect everything involved, and still get your bike started.

I have to admit I had a saddlebag lighting issue last year at the Jacksonville IBA ride, and had to get a jump start not once but twice while I was down there. No issues with the jump, just my pride. And I carry cables in my onboard tool bag. Have jumped other bikes also. So the moral is - not a problem to jump start - either as a donor or receiver.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Great info, thanks for the replies.:thumbup:
 

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Some good food for thought there and it makes perfect sense. Modern vehicles are getting more and more complex and there's no sense in taking unnecessary chances.
 

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What about from wing to another, I carry cables just in case. Should one leave the bike running so the other bike does not drain the other bike's battery down.
 

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Old days - running the other vehicle was a good idea - boosted available voltage from about 10.5 - 11.5 to around 13.8 - 14.2 volts, and if your were jumping another car that had an almost completely discharged battery (say lights left on) it gave a bit of extra ooomph to the dead vehicle, and prevented the good vehicle from having its battery drained.

But alas - in the quest to try and increase mpg, engineers (darn them guys :wink:) have redesigned the alternators on the newer vehicles to only charge if necessary, and do it in a pulse modulated fashion. Having the engine running whilst jumping another vehicle does not so great things to the sensing circuit and confuses it. This in turn does not so nice things to the various components on the jumped vehicle once it starts, and possibly the running vehicle because of the new electronical type systems.

That's the layman's description - I really have no desire to type a long winded one tonight. Point is, the wing's battery is small, you won't kill the donor vehicle by leaving the engine off, you'll protect everything involved, and still get your bike started.

I have to admit I had a saddlebag lighting issue last year at the Jacksonville IBA ride, and had to get a jump start not once but twice while I was down there. No issues with the jump, just my pride. And I carry cables in my onboard tool bag. Have jumped other bikes also. So the moral is - not a problem to jump start - either as a donor or receiver.
What about from wing to another, I carry cables just in case. Should one leave the bike running so the other bike does not drain the other bike's battery down.
It's best not to chance it and both batteries are small and the donor battery will have good cranking amperage. See the bold sentence in the article above.

gramps
 

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i am just curious as to why you guys say dont have car running i know a jump from the battery is like having that battery in your bike but having the car running is just going to charge your battery, unless you hook it up wrong,the alternator puts out the same as bike
Before I get into the explanation, look at it this way. A car battery from a car that is not running has an awful lot of current capacity, more than enough to start a dozen motorcycles without affecting its own state of charge by much. There is simply no need for the car to be running. That in itself should be reason enough.

The electrical systems of cars and bikes are indeed very similar, almost identical actually. But there is one distinct and important difference. A car's alternator does not "put out" the same as a bike. Far from it. The charging systems of the two types of vehicles are "calibrated" quite differently, for lack of a better word. When you hook your battery up to a car's battery, your bike battery becomes part of the car's electrical system. Car batteries are obviously much larger, with much higher charge and current capability. But the car's alternator doesn't know that you are hooking up a small motorcycle battery with a limited current capability.

When you first start a car, the alternator's initial recharge to its battery can be as high as 30 amps. Obviously the voltage has to rise significantly for that to happen too. This is much greater than what a motorcycle alternator will allow to flow to a bike battery. When you hook up a motorcycle battery to a running car, the alternator thinks that discharged state is its own battery, and increases the voltage and current to both batteries.

Most of us have checked both car and motorcycle voltages, and they appear to be the same, but they often are not. You can't judge charging current by measuring the voltage. A difference of just one or two tenths of a volt can actually mean 5 to 10 amps difference when charging a discharged battery.

To take a dead motorcycle battery to high current like that is an explosion hazard. Not only that, a motorcycle's electronics are not designed to withstand voltages that high. When you turn your bike's ignition on, all of the bike's electronics are exposed to that voltage.

This is no doubt a borderline condition. People have been following this practice for years and often do not have a problem, at least at first. But you can be certain that even if nothing blows on your bike, you have stressed many of the components on your bike, which could still result in a future failure. It kind of falls into the old Dirty Harry quote, "Do you feel lucky?

Problems like this, and the varying opinions on the issue go a long way toward at least partially explaining why some people seem to constantly have problems with their bikes, yet others never have any problems. Knock on wood, I have never in my 35 years of riding even had a taillight blow out on a bike. In fact, I have never had an electrical failure of any kind. (other than switches.) Luck can partially explain it, but following mfr guidelines is the biggest reason by far.
 

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Why not attach a battery tender? I have a permanent cord attached to both my wings. When not in use for longer than a couple weeks, I plug in the battery tender. Then when it's time to start, no issues. One of my bikes is an. '87 Aspencade, which has been known to draw in the battery all the time. If I don't either disconnect the battery or attach a tender for long term non-use, the battery will drain. No idea why either. I have had the best look at it, the late Jim Venne of Venco Wings, who was the best with antiques. He could not determine the problem after tearing the bike apart other than the clock that runs all the time. So I use a battery tender per his advice.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Why not attach a battery tender? I have a permanent cord attached to both my wings. When not in use for longer than a couple weeks, I plug in the battery tender. Then when it's time to start, no issues. One of my bikes is an. '87 Aspencade, which has been known to draw in the battery all the time. If I don't either disconnect the battery or attach a tender for long term non-use, the battery will drain. No idea why either. I have had the best look at it, the late Jim Venne of Venco Wings, who was the best with antiques. He could not determine the problem after tearing the bike apart other than the clock that runs all the time. So I use a battery tender per his advice.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I have a battery tender, with a permanent cord but that won't help me if I'm on a trip somewhere, I bought bike jumper cables to use for emergency use only and didn't know if I was going to fry something or not, guess I should have explained it better on my first post, thanks for the replies though. :thumbup:
 

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Carry one of these, it'll work for other things, tablets, phones, cameras, not just starting the bike, plus it's got a built in flashlight .


 

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Discussion Starter #17
Carry one of these, it'll work for other things, tablets, phones, cameras, not just starting the bike, plus it's got a built in flashlight .


that looks like a great idea, which one did you get Xp-1 or 3 do you have a link?
 

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There was a thread on here two or three weeks ago, anyway the one I got was the XP-1 kit, available online from many sources.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
There was a thread on here two or three weeks ago, anyway the one I got was the XP-1 kit, available online from any sources.
cool, thanks
 
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