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Discussion Starter #1
OK, this might start a firestorm. I've read quite a bit about the TPMS on later Wings, but don't remember ever reading that the TPMS system could even be reset. I can't find anything in the Owners Manual to support the possibility. Recently someone who supposedly knew told me that a TPMS reset was possible and that the procedure was as follows:

1. Warm up the tires
2. Fully engage the clutch, shut off the bike keeping the clutch engaged
3. With the clutch still engaged, restart the bike and release the clutch
4. TPMS is reset at current tire's psi

So is this accurate? Is the TPMS system reset-able, and if so is this the correct procedure? I've tried it several times, and honestly, I'm not sure it changed anything, so my skepticism continues.

Would like to hear your opinions and find out for sure.
 

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Lever out = clutch engaged. Lever pulled in = clutch disengaged. And no, I've never heard of this procedure before. Sounds hokey.
 

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OK, this might start a firestorm. I've read quite a bit about the TPMS on later Wings, but don't remember ever reading that the TPMS system could even be reset. I can't find anything in the Owners Manual to support the possibility.
When you say "reset" are you wanting to clear any existing fault codes or do you want to change the low pressure setting that the TPMS uses to report a low pressure condition?

There is a method in the service manual for clearing the fault codes, but I do not see anything for changing the low pressure value setting.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
M61A1MECH, the latter...to change the low pressure setting that the TPMS uses to report a low pressure condition? This whole thing might have been a hoax, but I also wish it was true as a way of resetting a bike's TPMS. For example, my car had a procedure to reset its TPMS after adjusting the tire pressures. If its good enough for cars, why not motorcycles? Hey Mother Honda!
 

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What cars do that?
(curious minds, and all that)

Only 'at home rest' I'm currently familiar with is the older GM system that could be used to re-teach sensor LOCATION after a tire rotation.
It didn't give ability to change 'normal' pressure setting.

GM went away from that system and now requires an electronic 'tool' to perform the location re-teach.
(the tool can be bought, but many service bays keep one on hand and will perform the re-teach as a drive-thru courtesy)

Newest version that I'm familiar with still uses an electonic hand tool for location re-learns, but (at least on some vehicles), the dealer computer/software can also change the 'normal' pressure value.
 

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This is of interest to me also. I've try to keep my tires around 40-41. When it's cold out the TMPS (on a 2012) flashes for about the first 3-5 minutes of a ride. Once the tires warm up, the light stops flashing. I would love to set it a little lower than it is so I don't have this issue. Yes, I could put more air in the tire (it's seems only the rear reds too low), but then when the tires warm up the pressure is higher than 40-41.
 

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Everything I have read on the GL TPMS tells me the parameters can not be changed and an activation tool is needed to reset the sensors, BUT I would think with the amount of technology in todays cars and motorcycles these systems should be able to handle a reset within the system. I for one just have no idea how it is done.


That being said, I do own an Ateq TPMS reset tool for my extra rear wheel that I swap out as tires are needed.

 

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Everything I have read on the GL TPMS tells me the parameters can not be changed and an activation tool is needed to reset the sensors, BUT I would think with the amount of technology in todays cars and motorcycles these systems should be able to handle a reset within the system. I for one just have no idea how it is done.


That being said, I do own an Ateq TPMS reset tool for my extra rear wheel that I swap out as tires are needed.


Next time you have your tires changed, find out who made the TPMS in your wheel. Call them up and ask what TPMS reset tool you need.


F6 rider.... Does your tool also work with your front tpms?
 

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Next time you have your tires changed, find out who made the TPMS in your wheel. Call them up and ask what TPMS reset tool you need.


F6 rider.... Does your tool also work with your front tpms?


Yes, front & rear. You can NOT only reset one, you have to reset both front & rear each time. It is a quick process BUT you need to remove the Seat to access the connector. I moved the connector so it is behind the side cover so it only takes me a few minutes to complete the entire reset process.
 

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OK, this might start a firestorm. I've read quite a bit about the TPMS on later Wings, but don't remember ever reading that the TPMS system could even be reset. I can't find anything in the Owners Manual to support the possibility. Recently someone who supposedly knew told me that a TPMS reset was possible and that the procedure was as follows:

1. Warm up the tires
2. Fully engage the clutch, shut off the bike keeping the clutch engaged
3. With the clutch still engaged, restart the bike and release the clutch
4. TPMS is reset at current tire's psi

So is this accurate? Is the TPMS system reset-able, and if so is this the correct procedure? I've tried it several times, and honestly, I'm not sure it changed anything, so my skepticism continues.

Would like to hear your opinions and find out for sure.

The system's thresholds are "hard coded" in the TPMS module and can not be changed. Front tire pressure is set for 36psi and the rear tire pressure is set for 40psi.


The "reset" often spoken about is actually to register wheel sensors to the TPMS module. If you swap sensors, you can use a tool like the Ateq vt15 to register the new sensors to the on bike module. The TPMS module can only store 2 registered sensors. The registering process requires both sensors to be done together. You can't just register one.



The register tool can also be used to "reverse" register the wheel sensors. The system is VERY simplistic and expects the wheel sensors to be registered in a specific order (front wheel first, then the rear wheel). If you change the order, the system is none the wiser. So, if you register the rear wheel sensor first, the on bike module will assign that sensor as the front wheel and expect it to be at 36psi. The front wheel sensor is then assigned the 40psi setting. This is used by some darksiders to allow them to run lower rear wheel pressure without having the low pressure light illuminate.


That is the only "reset" possible on the 2009 - 2017 GL1800. The 4 step procedure that you were provided is complete baloney.
 

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OK, this might start a firestorm. I've read quite a bit about the TPMS on later Wings, but don't remember ever reading that the TPMS system could even be reset. I can't find anything in the Owners Manual to support the possibility. Recently someone who supposedly knew told me that a TPMS reset was possible and that the procedure was as follows:

1. Warm up the tires
2. Fully engage the clutch, shut off the bike keeping the clutch engaged
3. With the clutch still engaged, restart the bike and release the clutch
4. TPMS is reset at current tire's psi

So is this accurate? Is the TPMS system reset-able, and if so is this the correct procedure? I've tried it several times, and honestly, I'm not sure it changed anything, so my skepticism continues.

Would like to hear your opinions and find out for sure.

The clutch IS engaged when the lever is fully released (out)..... the clutch is disengaged when the lever is pulled in ......
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks guys, for all of your replies. I guess this issue is resolved as suspected..."complete baloney." Due to the amount of interest in TPMS, it was at least worth the posting and reply efforts. So now we know! Cheers!
 
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