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I have looked at and compared a number of tire pressure guages and have found vast differences in the pressure readings from them from the same tire. Does anyone know of an accurate guage and where did you get it? If you're describing it as accurate, how did you come to that conclusion? i.e. - digital guages are supposed to be "very accurate" but they are only as good as they are calibrated. Thanks for feed back folks.
 

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I have used the EZ Air model EZ02 (http://www.ghmeiser.com/) for several years. When checked against "known" accurate gauges, it reads the same.

As a side note, I'm sending my unit back to GH Meiser for repair (replacement of chuck and o-ring...both need replacing as I use the gauge everyday) as well as having it checked for accuracy. They are charging me only $2.50 (postage) for this service.

I would buy from Meiser again.
 

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I just use a regular old pencil type gauge. I feel it's more important to check tire pressure often. Pressure can vary from temp differance anyway.
 

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DT said:
I have used the EZ Air model EZ02 (http://www.ghmeiser.com/) for several years. When checked against "known" accurate gauges, it reads the same.

As a side note, I'm sending my unit back to GH Meiser for repair (replacement of chuck and o-ring...both need replacing as I use the gauge everyday) as well as having it checked for accuracy. They are charging me only $2.50 (postage) for this service.

I would buy from Meiser again.

Mine just came back from warranty, great service from the company.
This gauge also makes it easy to fill tires and adjust the pressure. It stays connected to the tire valve while filling and has a bleeder valve to adjust the pressure.
 

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As far as accuracy goes the bourdon tube gauge is the most accurate. Those are the needle dial type. They are the most repeatable reading gauges from a known pressure source no matter what the pressure happens to be. If the gauge reads 45 psi from the source the first time and all variables are the same it should read 45 psi the second, third and fourth times. As far as the 45 psi actually being 45 psi at the source I have to assume the factory checks these gauges before they are shipped. I am not sure just how they do that though. The pencil gauges cannot be as repeatable in readings because of the friction of the slide section with dirt, grease etc. eventually collecting there.
I use an accu-gauge with an integral hose, bleed valve and a clip-on connector for the valve stem. It is easier to clip the hose onto the right angle valve stem and does not add any force to bend the stem. I could never get any of the digital gauges I had to read easily as I was always losing air while trying to hold the freaking gauge on the stem to get a reading. I like the accu-gauge much better for the reason of repeatability and ease of use. JMHO
 

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How accurate does it need to be? What's the tolerance you deem reasonable? Most guages sold are reasonably accurate. If they weren't manufacturers would be exposing themselves to liabilities like you wouldn't believe in this day and age. Ask yourself "how accurate are the guages your tire dealers using?" I guarantee when their's breaks they go down to Wal-Mart and get another.

LAW
 

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I have to agree with Fred in that the digital gauges reproduce accurately also. I just have a problem using them with the angled valve stems on the GL1800. I had to wiggle and push so hard to get the ones I had to seat properly without losing air I was afraid I was going to snap the valve stem off. With the one I use now I just push the hose onto the valve stem and release the clip and it stays in place while I continuously check pressure and add air with the pump or release air with the in-line valve on the unit. At 67 the ole bones don't like to stay bent over for any length of time and of course the belly is always getting in the way too. I think any gauge is fine as long as it is properly cared for and is always used.
 

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I have had the same question for some time now. I own 5 guages and they are ALL different (3 are digital & 2 are dial mechanical). I am moving over to the digital guages because they tend to offer more precision. I carry a guage on the bike. The mechanical guages don't like being bumped around on the ride and they tend to change over time. Digital guages are more tolerant of the ride. I still like the ease of use of my Acugage with the bleeder valve, but I'm concerned that it isn't as accurate as I want. It is 4 pounds off from my Milton and 2 pounds off of my best digital. BTW, I changed over to solid 90 degree valve stems and no longer have the issue with the rubber flexing and the keeper. Try it! You'll Like it!
 

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I always have dozens of pencil type air gauges laying around the farm. Once in awhile I'll gather as many of them together as I can find and test them all. The gauges that are off the average by more than a couple of pounds get tossed in the garbage....or perhaps "chucked" is a more appropriate term. Some are name brand and others are discount store generics but it doesn't seem to matter. The best ones get used on my Gold Wing's tires.

Through the years, I've had several digital gauges and every one of them was junk....either inaccurate(off the aforementioned average) or not durable. Maybe I bought cheap ones or maybe I'm abusive, I don't know. Anyway, the digitals all reside in the landfill nowadays.
 

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amandabiker said:
As far as accuracy goes the bourdon tube gauge is the most accurate.
How did you come to this conclusion? That was rhetorical so, nevermind.

In the case of the Wing, accuracy is the least of your concerns. Sure, you want it to be close, but, as LAW said, how close? For us repeatability is much more improtant. And, when it comes to repeatability, the digital tire gages are more likely to repeat.

The reason that is so has to do with mechanics. Less moving parts means lower hysteresis and better repeatability. So, digital is better in this case.

Either way, get rid of the extra gages and use one. It's better to set your tires the same all the time and be a little off than to set them differently every time by using different gages.
 

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Consumer reports tested some a while back and found this one to be pretty good. I have 3 of them. One on the bike and one in each car. All read the same and are very consistent too.

NRA

Accutire MS-4000 Backlit Lithium Digital Tire Gauge

http://www.amazon.com/Accutire-MS-4000- ... B00005AXI4
 

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Rastoff said:
amandabiker said:
As far as accuracy goes the bourdon tube gauge is the most accurate.
How did you come to this conclusion? That was rhetorical so, nevermind.

In the case of the Wing, accuracy is the least of your concerns. Sure, you want it to be close, but, as LAW said, how close? For us repeatability is much more improtant. And, when it comes to repeatability, the digital tire gages are more likely to repeat.

The reason that is so has to do with mechanics. Less moving parts means lower hysteresis and better repeatability. So, digital is better in this case.

Either way, get rid of the extra gages and use one. It's better to set your tires the same all the time and be a little off than to set them differently every time by using different gages.
Rastoff,
I mis-spoke in my previous post. I was stating accuracy over the pencil-type gauges. And I agree with your final statement about using one gauge.
 

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NRA lifemember - I'm curious if that gage can be read in the sunshine?
 

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Smitty said:
NRA lifemember - I'm curious if that gage can be read in the sunshine?
Yes, no problem, the display is quite good. It's back lit for low light but the contrast is easy to see in the daylight also.
 

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If you got one that was accurate you would never know it. I spent the past 6 months trying to find a calibration company that I could check mine against and the prices they wanted just for a check were twice what the gauges cost.

How accurate does it really need to be? I hate to disagree with you Rastoff because I know you do this for a living, but I think accuracy is very important. If I want to keep my front tire at the recommended 36 psi and the gauge reads 4 lbs high, I will only have 32 lbs of pressure in my tires. 32 lbs will cause tire cupping and premature tire wear.

My experience is different than Freds. I have checked about a dozen analog and 6 digitals and they all give wildly different readings. A bourdon gauge is probably the only way for a consumer to get fairly accurate readings. I wouldn't throw away the other gauges, just get a good bourdon gauge for the garage and add or subtract the difference between the two.
 

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The fifty million dollar question. Between thermometers and air pressure gauges I stay up at night and ponder. If you have 10 pressure gauges all lined up and use them, how do you know which one is correct? Same with temp gauges. How do you know which one really is 32 degrees?
 

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How do you know which one really is 32 degrees?
_________________
Steven, stick it in a bucket of ice water.
 

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Toyo said:
If you have 10 pressure gauges all lined up and use them, how do you know which one is correct? Same with temp gauges. How do you know which one really is 32 degrees?
You will not know which tire gage is correct unless you have a standard to compare it to.

Now the temperature gage is easy to create a standard for. Tim was right to say to put it in a bucket of ice water.

Water is a strange substance. It exhibits a characteristic that works really nicely for checking temperature gage. Water is the only substance I know of that can exist as a gas, liquid and solid at the same temperature. It's called the tripple point. What this means is once you create this tripple point, you know that the temperature is exactly 32°F or 0°C.

It's easy to make. Take an insulated container like a styrofoam cup or thermos. Add distilled water and crushed ice. You must use distilled water because any contaminates will ruin the effect. Anyway, mix the ice and water and stir until you have the consistancy of a slushy. Voila, you have a perfect standard that is 32°F.

Now, if you want to make a good pressure standard, you can use one of these:

This is the venerable Hook Gage. By using this you can get really accurate pressure from a calibrated length. It works on the principle of water finding its own level. This is getting too long and I'm not going to go into it. However, if you just have to check the accuracy of your air gage, build your own Hook Gage. (Hint: you will need buckets large enough to hold about 50lbs of water.)

Larry,
Of course accuracy is important, but until anyone can answer the question of "How accurate?", we can't decide what is good enough. The best gage, including bourdon tube gages, will have an accuracy of +/-1 division. (Acutally there are better gages out there, but the average Winger isn't going to spend that kind of money.) Also, most tire gages have divisions that indicate 2lbs/division. That means that your accuracy has a potential swing of 4lbs. So, shooting for a pressure of 36psi you will get between 34 and 38psi on a normal day.

Further, it depends on what the temperature is at the time of checking. The results you get at 40°F will be different than at 80°F. Can that temperature difference be as much or more than a couple of psi? I don't know off hand and I'm way to lazy to do the math, but I believe it can be.

This brings me back to my point of consistancy. For our purposes, checking the pressure at the same temp with the same gage will yield better results than agonizing over weather or not your gage is accurate. There are just too many variables to be really accurate with a low dollar gage in an uncontrolled environment.
 
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