GL1800Riders Forums banner
21 - 28 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,155 Posts
And we wonder why some people think motorcycle riders are crazy? You have to be at least a half bubble out of plumb to remember some of the episodes above and still keep riding. And yet, I can think of many happenings similar to above and I still am out there. And my co-rider must be a little demented. She still is ready to go.:love:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
These days I accept my phobias; sharks, grizzles and lightning. Well, actually I've always been accepting.

I stay out of salt water (even brackish in all honesty) , avoid the woods where the big guys roam and use an app to see what's in that rain up ahead. No problem with rain really, but those big discharges will either get me off the road or delay my ride if I'm already off said road.

I've seen all the stats, I've dealt with enough actuaries and aviators to have heard every insult to my intellect but when the stuff is hitting the ground, I prefer to hide instead of ride. And I do mean hide. I'm the guy who will refuse to walk across the parking lot to get to the car. That kind of "prefer to hide" extreme. Somehow I didn't manage to influence my offspring.....

I see people riding in the presence of lightning all the time, especially in Florida. I just can't bring myself to do it. I'm sure there are others with this affliction but I don't recall meeting them.

I guess the doctor is waiting to see me now. They're going to take me away he he, they're going to take me away ha ha....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
Nodaker used the right words, "seared into my mind". Not because I've preferred it, but I've always believed that misery breeds camaraderie. Military folks or first responders who've gone through some version of hellfire understand this concept. Most who have gone through the kind of rides Nodaker described can as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
I would agree. Some of the most memorable are the torrential rains, the 10 miles home in so much rain the water was running over the curbs or out on trips - conversations with people and the awe and wonder about how I can enjoy riding in the rain. Being invigorated by the storms blowing through and watching the clouds off in the distance, enjoying the rain and loving the sun coming out. The smells that permeate the air and a sense of "I made it" as the rain ends.
I LOVE being behind the handlebars on two wheels.
 

·
Registered
2020 Tour Manual, 2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan
Joined
·
523 Posts
I've got the opposite dilemma coming up. Last year I did a 2 week tour from NY to Montana/Wyoming hitting all the "required" roads and Yellowstone, etc. No rain, no heat, no cold. The only "weather" I had to deal with were cross winds riding across the Great Plains/High Plains.

However, last year I did spend an entire day on the BRP in the rain and dense fog. All's I could see was the solid yellow line and thank god for that. Perhaps riding in those conditions spared me on my Montana trip.

So, with my good fortune on my ride out West, I know I'm in for a heap of bad weather this year. But I do agree with Nodakar in that harsh conditions do get etched into your mind.

One more thing, riding with a 3/4 helmet in a hail storm is not fun, but it surely is memorable!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
I've been riding for 59 years and I have many unpleasant weather/road related memories.
Caught in snowstorm from Berlin to Keene, NH.
Hailstorm in western Maine and also in Colorado.
110 degrees Boise, Idaho, 108 degrees Portland, OR
Rain from Virginia to South Carolina
Severe wind from Utah to Wyoming
Thick bugs between Yellowstone and southwestern Idaho.
Thick fog (clouds) Mt. Washington, NH
Cold and rain at night in April from New Hampshire to Virginia
Severe thunderstorms, Kancamagus Highway, NH
Steep, winding, unpaved mountain road in Utah.
Heat and dust in the Christmas Valley area of OR.
Rode 15 miles to work at ten below zero.
Heavy rain during the summer in Florida. Riding through deep water on Rt. 301 north of Ocala tried to knock my feet off the pegs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
896 Posts
I'd much prefer to ride in nice weather, and won't start a ride if its already raining unless the ride is to get home from someplace I visited and its time to go. But early in my riding day, about 35 years ago, I was in Texas and just getting comfortable riding my Honda cruiser. I was riding in the Hill Country north of San Antonio and foolishly (maybe) I linked up with 3 riders at a gas station when they asked if I wanted to join the group for the day's ride. I was the tail of the formation, and struggling to keep up with the experienced riders. Now I know better, but I was pushing myself to stay with the group. Then a deluge began. I had never ridden in rain at all, but I was far from home and had no idea where I was or how I would get back to familiar territory. I knew the group was heading back to Fredericksburg, and from there I knew how to get home. So despite the rain which I was sure would wash my bike off the road I stayed with the others. It took only a short while for me to realize that my cruiser could do just fine in the rain and so could I. After that day I never worried about rain, but just try to avoid the discomfort.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nodaker

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
I have come to the realization the term "Waterproof" is simply an advertising term and in reality does not exist given enough rain and time on the bike.
Indeed, anything will leak under enough pressure.
There are steps you can take.
1. Waterproof garments need a renewal of the DWC, durable waterproof coating, now and then, even Goretex. Do it outside.
2. People who live and ride in rainy places learn to wear waterproof pants and jacket and then put the rain suit over it in a big downpour.
3. Close down all the openings. Often we get wet due to open necks or water down the back of the neck, or up the pants. A waterproof balaclava is a good idea.
 
21 - 28 of 28 Posts
Top