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The few times I laid my 1800 over on the crash bars standing still, and found both front and back sidewalls on the tires are resting/touching the ground, a plus when picking it back up.

Now what happens when it's laid over going down the road at any speed in a slid?

Wouldn't those tires prevent the 1800 from a smooth slid and try to grip on whatever surface your sliding on?

I read many mishaps on laying a wing over, but feel those tires don't slid when in contact will asphalt.

Thanks....just curious.

Oh...BTW, I hope I never find out.

Cheers!
 

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If you stay on the bike it will slide a long way on those crash bars. The tires will have little or no traction on the road.

Once you roll off, the bike will tilt upward untill the rubber grabs the road, causing the bike to flip over.

You don't want to be in front of the bike at that time.
 

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Or, the bike will right itself without you on it and keep going for a long time until it hits something. A friend of ours GL1800 did just that.
 

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I don't know about both crash bars, but you can still recover from making contact with the front bar and the centerstand. I'm guessing at about 65 mph. Does feel like the limit though.

BTW, this is the guy I was trying to catch up with a couple of miles later. I did catch him and watch him attempt the maneuver you describe. It was a spectacular dismount.
 

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I went off this summer. The bike kept going with the trailer attached for about 50' and what seemed like an eternity. The front of the motor crash bar was scraper as well as the underside of one saddlebag.
 

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At speed, the first thing that touches are the rider's pegs. These are soft points and you can grind them to your heart's desire, but you probably don't want to go much further.

The next thing that hits is the exhaust system, which has some give, but not much.

After that comes the engine guard. Once the engine guards hit, you are very close to pivoting the tires off the road. Try not to get this far.
 

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Last November when my wife and I were run off of the road we did a 40 foot slide forward on the left side of the wing. We stayed on the bike and the crash bars (front and rear) were sliding across the pavement.

The tires did not grab as we slid forward the entire way. The crash bars protected our feet, ankles and legs the entire way. There were a few scrapes on the mirror, farring, peg and exhaust.

There are many forces at work in a crash. Our crash allowed us to slide to a stop then we rolled off of the wing onto the street.

On another note my body armor and helmet did thier job. Now I just need to find some rib protection becuase on rib still hurts.

Chuck
MBD
 

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Mine went straight, laying on the left side crash bars and Kury highway bar mounts for quite a distance until it stopped against the fire truck in the intersection.
 

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When mine went down with the camper behind at about 50 MPH it slid thru the intersection, across the road, and into the ditch. It rode the whole way on the left crash bars. When it hit the bottom of the ditch it flipped over to the right side. That is when the damage occured. I seperated from the bike as soon as it went down. Got some minor road rash and a cracked bone in my wrist and wrecked my 3 week old helmet.
 

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So, then inquiring minds want to know: it is better to try and stay attached to the bike as it's sliding or to try and bail? One of my biggest worries as a passenger is not knowing exactly what to do if it appears we are going down. How about those rear hand handles--do you grab them to keep your arms in? I realize there may not even be time to think, but if there are a few seconds, what are the suggestions?
Thanks and sorry if I have stolen this thread!
 

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I would grab anything that isn't coming off the motorcycle! I think it would be better to stay with the bike as long as possible but just not in the front of it. Each situation will and is different. If I was headed for a semi....I would bail out ASAP!

Definately something to think about....

Ride On!
 

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It is possible to recover from a low side. I went onto my right side crash bars, the rear wheel came off the ground and the bike rocked two or three times front to rear. Keeping head and eyes up and avoiding sudden inputs, I righted the bike and continued on. Or I should say it righted itself, I think it was 95% luck. I have read on Keith Code's website that a low side is often recoverable. Not something I want to practice, at least not on my own bike.

My riding buddies insist that I had a crash. I say it isn't a crash until you butt leaves the seat. :lol:
 

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I'm with you AZ. I'd classify it as a close encounter of the weird kind. Definately not a crash unless you hit something besides the surface of the earth.

Like they say in aviation: A good landing is one you can walk away from. A great landing is when you can use the airplane over again.

Sounds like you made a great recovery. 8)
 

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I've lifted the rear tire off the ground a couple of times at slow speeds. Not too hard to recover from although the grinding noise does attract attention! 'Wouldn't want to try it at anything over 20mph.

I went down once at 25 on frozen slush. I was trying to switch lanes and got caught up in a pile of slush between the lanes. The front-end started its hardest tank-slapper ever. The rear tire held up as long as it had some soft stuff to work with but as soon as it got on the frozen stuff, it went out. The bike stayed on its crash bars but the tires had nothing to grab on to. I stayed in the seat until the last few feet when I was getting off to get the bike back up.

I remember thinking I might be able to get the front end back under control and actually getting the tank-slapping down a bit, but once the rear end went lose, it was all about whatever the bike wanted to do. In fact, even as gentle as it was, I can not recall anything about the time from just before going down to pushing myself off the bike - about two seconds of total blank. Weird.
 

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Itchyhitch said:
So, then inquiring minds want to know: it is better to try and stay attached to the bike as it's sliding or to try and bail? One of my biggest worries as a passenger is not knowing exactly what to do if it appears we are going down. How about those rear hand handles--do you grab them to keep your arms in? I realize there may not even be time to think, but if there are a few seconds, what are the suggestions?
Thanks and sorry if I have stolen this thread!
Stay with the bike. The bike can handle impacts much better than your body, and there is no sense in spreading out the debris (such as your body) that other vehicles need to avoid. Hold on to whatever part of the bike you can and enjoy the ride. Sliding on the wing is almost as comfortable as rolling on the wing.... and a whole bunch more exciting!
 

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Dorian_Blue said:
Itchyhitch said:
So, then inquiring minds want to know: it is better to try and stay attached to the bike as it's sliding or to try and bail? One of my biggest worries as a passenger is not knowing exactly what to do if it appears we are going down. How about those rear hand handles--do you grab them to keep your arms in? I realize there may not even be time to think, but if there are a few seconds, what are the suggestions?
Thanks and sorry if I have stolen this thread!
Stay with the bike. The bike can handle impacts much better than your body, and there is no sense in spreading out the debris (such as your body) that other vehicles need to avoid. Hold on to whatever part of the bike you can and enjoy the ride. Sliding on the wing is almost as comfortable as rolling on the wing.... and a whole bunch more exciting!
I say seperate yourself from the bike as soon as possible. I have only been down once but I wouldn't want to have slid down the road as far as the bike went. At least a couple hundred feet. When I hit the road I seperated from the bike and rolled what seemed like forever , probably about 50 feet, but when I stopped rolling I got up and only had some minor road rash and a slightly cracked wrist. I was wearing a 3/4 helmet, a flannel shirt, jeans, and tennis shoes. If you are with the bike and it highsides and starts flipping you will be in serious trouble. This is my opinion and every accident is different.
 

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Itchyhitch said:
So, then inquiring minds want to know: it is better to try and stay attached to the bike as it's sliding or to try and bail? One of my biggest worries as a passenger is not knowing exactly what to do if it appears we are going down. How about those rear hand handles--do you grab them to keep your arms in? I realize there may not even be time to think, but if there are a few seconds, what are the suggestions?
Thanks and sorry if I have stolen this thread!
In my case,I had no time to think,but somehow managed to bail.If I had stayed with the bike,it would have been ugly.I'm glad I didn't have a passenger on board ...

 
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