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Discussion Starter #1
Need to purchase new headlights for 02. Anybody know pros and cons for using LED H7 Lights. Will they cause any issues to the circuit? i.e.: resistor required, etc.
 

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I wonder about the brightness and focus of the LED lamps. I work in theatre and have seen some bright LEDs so i guess it is possable.

Allen
 

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I wouldn't touch LED H7 replacements with a 10 foot pole. They are a scam. Their output is a fraction of the output of a halogen lamp. They are also not DOT legal as primary headlights.

In addition to the low output, it will act like a floodlight. The reflectors in your headlight housing are tuned to one point, where the filament is. With the dozens of LED's in one of those headlights, there is no one focal point, which screws up the cutoff.

The LED options offered by some of the mfrs cost thousands of dollars, unlike the $10 H7 replacements. High power LED's generate a lot of heat, and OEM LED headlights have massive heatsinks attached to the LED's. One of the versions is glycol cooled.

A little bit of progress is made each year, and we will see it happen sometime in the near future, but not yet.
 

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I wouldn't touch LED H7 replacements with a 10 foot pole. They are a scam. Their output is a fraction of the output of a halogen lamp. They are also not DOT legal.

In addition to the low output, it will act like a floodlight. The reflectors in your headlight housing are tuned to one point, where the filament is. With the dozens of LED's in one of those headlights, there is no one focal point, which screws up the cutoff.

The LED options offered by some of the mfrs cost thousands of dollars, unlike the $10 H7 replacements. High power LED's generate a lot of heat, and those OEM LED headlights have massive heatsinks attached to the LED's. One of the versions is glycol cooled.
I'm with Larry on this one.:agree:

Waste of money and time.

later..Randy
 

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Its not just the lumen output of the LED lights in a headlight unit, but the whole focus and projection of the light onto the road. Probably be fine for a DRL.

A conventional bulb with a filament produces its light from a small area where it is focused and projected by the reflector and lens. The LED lighting elements that I have seen have about 15-18 LED's stuck on a cylinder facing in radially. Hard to see how sticking that in a lighting assembly designed for a point light source is going to do anything other than throw light everywhere except where it is usable. This is an issue with some of the HID capsules, which are far closer in shape to a conventional incandescent headlight than an LED assembly.

I have read where some people that have converted their taillights to LEDs have commented that the "light cone" to the rear narrows. Stand to the rear of GW with LED taillights and then move to the side. At a fairly shallow angle, the light disappears. Could be bad if you are stopped in a partially completed turn.

Saw where there are companies that are making LED replacement aircraft landing lights. But there there are not the beam pattern and cut-off requirements there are on vehicles. And they are pricey, tho their durability and longevity offset that.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was looking on ebay and found numerous H7 LED lamps that were around $25 or so. Good point on the focal point. The set I was looking at had this discription:


Type
  • H7 3W LED Light - Super Write
Description
  • Socket type : H7
  • Power : 3W
  • Lumen : 1100Lm~1200Lm
  • Color Temperature : 6500-7500K
  • High quality
  • Power saving
  • Voltage: DC12-24V
  • Light Color: White
  • Life Expectancy: more than 50000 hours
Application
  • Head Light / Fog Light / Beam Light
  • 100% Brand new
Include
  • 2pcs x H7 3W LED Light
 
Please click on image for larger version.
Product Price & Delivery:

Sales Price: $18.00 USDShipping Fee: $7.00 USDCategory #: Toppier
Company Information:

Store Name : Zenaracing
(eBay store avail.)Email Ad. : [email protected]Shipping to : Worldwide except to ItalyBiz. Hours : Mon-Fri (2am - 2pm) GMT
 

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The above pictures showing the light coming out of the light units really doesn't show anything, other than the fact that the LEDs fit the housing and put out light.

Would love to see this photo set repeated but with the camera inside the car looking out the windshield and the car on a dark country road, so we can see how well the LEDs light up the road.

LED headlights probably are coming. It will take a while for the engineers to develop powerful enough LEDs and to design light housings that can utilize their output.

Already seeing some cars with LED taillights. Understand that they are life of the car items.
 

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No personal experience here..
but the top Prius has LED headlights
and the chatter on those boards is that they are better...

nothing scientific but the pictures look promising..

Top: Prius III Halogen headlights and .. Bottom: Prius V's LED headlights:
Both are complete with projectors..





Dennis
 

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No personal experience here..
but the top Prius has LED headlights
and the chatter on those boards is that they are better...

nothing scientific but the pictures look promising..

Top: Prius III Halogen headlights and .. Bottom: Prius V's LED headlights:
Both are complete with projectors..

Dennis
You are right Dennis. Cars do have them. And the output is actually better than a halogen lamp. But those lamps cost thousands of dollars. Lexus, Audio, and Cadillac also have LED headlights.

But also keep in mind that even with the high cost involved, all of the OEM applications have to use multiple housings to get adequate light output. A single lamp array with adequate light output doesn't exist, no matter how much money you are willing to spend.



And Daytime Running Lamps are becoming almost commonplace. Their lower output means mfr's don't have to be concerned about controlling the light pattern, making it is easier to get regulatory approval.

LED has become a huge buzzword in the past 10 years, and I am as interested in the technology as anyone. We are all used to owning products with low power LED's that last a lifetime and draw very little power.

But a problem happens as power output increases. LED's become less efficient as their brightness increases, and their reliability drops considerably. OEM LED headlights draw nearly as much power as a halogen equivalent, and generate a lot of heat. The big problem is that unlike a halogen, which radiates its heat forward, LED's radiate their heat at the back of the substrate. Finding ways to dissipate the heat is a big problem. LED's are semiconductors, just like the transistors, diodes, and IC's that are built into the products we own. When the semiconductors in those products get hot, they become less reliable, and are more prone to thermal runaway and failure. Heat is the prime enemy of all semiconductors.

For now, even if you could by an aftermarket retrofit that had adequate light output to replace halogen bulbs, (which you can't), a lamp with that high of an output would not offer any advantage over what we use now.

We will get there someday. We are probably on the brink. But even though they will be less wasteful and more reliable than the products they replace, they will probably never reach the lofty goals that were once promised.
 

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You are right Dennis. Cars do have them. And the output is actually better than a halogen lamp. But those lamps cost thousands of dollars. Lexus, Audio, and Cadillac also have LED headlights.

But also keep in mind that even with the high cost involved, all of the OEM applications have to use multiple housings to get adequate light output. A single lamp array with adequate light output doesn't exist, no matter how much money you are willing to spend.



And Daytime Running Lamps are becoming almost commonplace. Their lower output means mfr's don't have to be concerned about controlling the light pattern, making it is easier to get regulatory approval.

LED has become a huge buzzword in the past 10 years, and I am as interested in the technology as anyone. We are all used to owning products with low power LED's that last a lifetime and draw very little power.

But a problem happens as power output increases. LED's become less efficient as their brightness increases, and their reliability drops considerably. OEM LED headlights draw nearly as much power as a halogen equivalent, and generate a lot of heat. The big problem is that unlike a halogen, which radiates its heat forward, LED's radiate their heat at the back of the substrate. Finding ways to dissipate the heat is a big problem. LED's are semiconductors, just like the transistors, diodes, and IC's that are built into the products we own. When the semiconductors in those products get hot, they become less reliable, and are more prone to thermal runaway and failure. Heat is the prime enemy of all semiconductors.

For now, even if you could by an aftermarket retrofit that had adequate light output to replace halogen bulbs, (which you can't), a lamp with that high of an output would not offer any advantage over what we use now.

We will get there someday. We are probably on the brink. But even though they will be less wasteful and more reliable than the products they replace, they will probably never reach the lofty goals that were once promised.
led :eek:4:dont do it . i just sent back led 9006 bulbs for fog lights :eek:4::eek:4::eek:4::eek:4:. the parking lights were better NOW , HID IS THE WAY TO GO . THAT WHAT THE CARS ARE USING:excited:, AND ITS WHAT IS IN MY LOW BEAM
 
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