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Discussion Starter #1
Or "Stupid is as stupid does".

(For the 'Darkside Content', scroll down to the bold face section.)


I became aware of the Moonshine Lunch Run a few years ago and tucked it away in my "must do" file.


This year the stars aligned: the piggy bank was available, the time was available - and the weather forecast looked like a big change from the usual "wimps need not apply". Yippee, I'm in.


Perfect opportunity for a SS2k on the way to Illinois. I booked a night at the Blue Swallow Motel (you simply MUST stay here!) in Tucumcari, NM, giving 1010 miles the first day. From there it would be another 1010 miles to Casey, IL., so I booked two nights in Effingham.
For the trip home I planned to split the distance into 900/700/450, so I booked a hotel in Amarillo, TX and planned to stay with family in Phoenix the last night.


In keeping with my wimpy tendencies, I decided that I should take the Hondapotamus instead of the FJR. Having done SS rides on Her Immenseness before, she was set up for comfort. Not as fun, but comfortable - an acceptable trade off for a 4000+ mile! could get T-storms in OKC coming home, I want my blankie ride.


On Wednesday I changed the oil, packed everything on the bike, filled the hydration system, printed the IBA forms, and plotted all the fuel stops for both legs of the SS2k.
I 'saved' the addresses in my lowly Garmin 2595lm and used the unit's resident 'app' to create a two-part trip.
Then the Garmin died.


No problem, I have paper maps packed - and I always have index cards for each leg as a backup. I'll just navigate like in the "olden days".


To bed early, up at 0130, coffee & oatmeal while making my peanut butter sandwiches for the road.
Filled the tank and "started the clock" at 0255.


Made great time. Those AZ & NM speed limits (75) really make the miles fly by. Even with my 15-minute fuel & restroom breaks, I was over an hour ahead of schedule at the halfway mark. Rolled off the freeway in Tucumcari just as the sun was slipping behind the hills.
1060 miles, 15 hours 20 minutes; 69mph overall, including fuel/restroom breaks. Easily BBG pace.


And then it all started to unravel.

At the end of the off ramp I had to wait for a couple truckers before I could make my left turn. When it was my turn to go, the bike felt... Sluggish. Like I was driving in 3 inches of sand through the turn.
The right turn into the Love's fuel depot was only slightly better.
I fueled and headed out - again having to 'work' through the corners.
Was my rear tire low?

I got to the Blue Swallow Motel (did I mention that you MUST stay there?) I parked near the front door on the concrete.
Nancy greeted me and walked me back to show me my room. Every room has a garage, complete with dirt floor (the place was built in 1939 and was a new concept), and the room was really nice.
We went back to the office, I paid & told them that I'd be quiet when I rolled out at 0400 the next morning) and I went out to move my bike to the garage. It was almost dark as I began duck-walking the bike backwards... With great difficulty. I fired it up and drove it back to the garage and began to process the predicament.

Part of my thought about a low rear tire involved the fact that Her Immenseness is shod with a Michelin Alpin runflat (gasp!) car tire... wait for it... that I put a plug in about six months ago.
Had the plug failed?
If so, when?
For how many miles had I been riding at 80mph on a tire with low pressure?
Why had I not (yet) followed the advise of my fellow Darksiders and installed a TPMS?
Was there any point in rolling the bike out before bedtime and checking?

Clearly my plans for an 0400 departure were in the toilet and, upon further calculation - when & where to get a new tire to replace the one that is now ready to die a cruel death from its recent abuse - so was the possibility of getting to Moonshine before lunch, or dinner.

I thanked the gods that I was still alive, sat down, picked up my iPhone, and called to cancel my motel reservations in IL for Friday and Saturday and in Amarillo for Sunday. I also turned off my 0300 alarm clock.
Then I went to the office and talked to Linda's husband (who also rides) about where I might find a motorcycle shop and/or tire store. As luck would have it, both could be found right in the booming metropolis of Tucumcari and opened at 0800.
And the Blue Swallow Motel had one vacancy for Friday night, in case I needed to wait for a new tire to be delivered. (Again I remind you to stay at the Blue Swallow Motel)

By now my brain was as tired as the rest of me and I went to bed.
Sunrise hit my eyes and I got up and dressed. I went to the office and enjoyed a couple cups of coffee and learned that a good breakfast could be had at "Kix on 66" restaurant - just a couple blocks down the street.
I decided that I'd move the bike out to the concrete and check the tire pressure before breakfast.
I carry two tires gauges - one 'stick' and one 'dial' - and had used them both the afternoon before I left home. Down on the concrete in front of the Blue Swallow Motel (go there!) I pressed the 'stick' gauge in the tire stem and briefly wondered it it would register anything.

WTF!?!?!?!
32 psi, same as at home.
NFW.
Checked it again, same result.
Checked the front - 41psi, same as at home.

When life hands you lemons, make lemonade.
When you THINK life hands you lemons, look closely. You many just be tired from a long day, too many granola bars, and uneven surfaces.

I cancelled the Friday reservation at the Blue Swallow Motel (GO!), walked down the street for breakfast (gave the waitress a 66% tip), and then called my bride. She was pleased that I'd be home three days early and that my road trip would cost 1/3 of the original estimate.

Friday's shorter ride (615 miles) toward home included beautiful AZ 87 on the way to a night with my MIL in Phoenix.
Saturday's 425 miles to home included headwind from Gila Bend to Yuma, and lots of "fun" with "high wind warnings" beginning about 30 miles west of El Centro and continuing for about 60 miles. Crosswinds, gusts, suddenly disappearing wind shadows and more gusts, and then the real fun of uphill right- and left-hand sweepers at 60mph with sudden strong gusts.

Wheeeee! Great chance to practice and hone handling skills.

"I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I ended up where I needed to be." ~ Douglas Adams
 

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So no hole in the tire after all, just a bad reading of the gage?
 

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I don't think the gauge gave a bad reading was the seat of the pants that gave the false reading I believe
 

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:agree: He's been spending waaaay too much time with Lucille, and Rose the Wingabago got jealous and let him know it.

Nice write-up though.

AND GET A TPMS YOU IDGET! :nojoke:
 

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Well how about that!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
:agree: He's been spending waaaay too much time with Lucille, and Rose the Wingabago got jealous and let him know it.

Nice write-up though.

AND GET A TPMS YOU IDGET! :nojoke:
I resemble that remark!

I've got a Doran on my wish list....
 

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They say half the fun of a trip is in the planning..
.. is that true?:roll:

;-) ;-) ;-) ;-) ;-)
Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter #8
They say half the fun of a trip is in the planning..
.. is that true?:roll:

;-) ;-) ;-) ;-) ;-)
Dennis
All the fun of a trip is the planning...

until you put the kickstand up and twist the throttle! Then the adventure begins.

I try to explain to my darling bride, that wonderful experience of being "one with the bike":

Cruising along I-40 at 75mph, eyes scanning the road ahead for defect or debris;

glancing at the mirrors;

checking the speedo, fuel, temp, and sometimes the ODO;

being aware of every car, truck, bus, motorcycle around you and of how their drivers are doing, of any changes in their position relative to each other an you;

monitoring my body parts and adjusting for comfort;

keeping track of speed limit signs, construction signs, distances to cities & transitions ahead - as well as the mile markers and exit numbers as I get in range of my next fuel stop;

noting clouds, temperature, wind direction & gusts, and terrain changes;

reciting poetry try or song lyrics, singing to yourself - and giggling at the wonder of it all;

and enjoying the beautiful scenery!

All without even noticing that you are thinking about it.

She smiles her loving smile, and I realize that it's like trying to explain an experience had at a Grateful Dead Concert to someone who never went.

Nothing compares!
 

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All the fun of a trip is the planning...

until you put the kickstand up and twist the throttle! Then the adventure begins.

I try to explain to my darling bride, that wonderful experience of being "one with the bike":

Cruising along I-40 at 75mph, eyes scanning the road ahead for defect or debris;

glancing at the mirrors;

checking the speedo, fuel, temp, and sometimes the ODO;

being aware of every car, truck, bus, motorcycle around you and of how their drivers are doing, of any changes in their position relative to each other an you;

monitoring my body parts and adjusting for comfort;

keeping track of speed limit signs, construction signs, distances to cities & transitions ahead - as well as the mile markers and exit numbers as I get in range of my next fuel stop;

noting clouds, temperature, wind direction & gusts, and terrain changes;

reciting poetry try or song lyrics, singing to yourself - and giggling at the wonder of it all;

and enjoying the beautiful scenery!

All without even noticing that you are thinking about it.

She smiles her loving smile, and I realize that it's like trying to explain an experience had at a Grateful Dead Concert to someone who never went.

Nothing compares!
..And therein lies the magic.:bow:

I wish I could meditate on a candle flame.
I cannot.
.. but sit me on the bike knowing i've got nothing else to do for another one thousand or two thousand miles and bingo,
just like that, I'm in that indescribable magic "zone".

Hope you get another shot at the moonshine run.

Dennis

 

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Dennis/bgross - Your philosophical view of riding a scoot is a wonder to behold. You are of course preaching to the choir, but sometimes the rest of us need to remember and read the words of why, all of us enjoy our hobby so much. As has been said many times, one never sees a motorcycle in front of a shrink's office and we all know why. Many thanks to both of you for your eloquent explanations of what I already knew, but don't think of enough. Take care, and enjoy.

Crabby Bob :bow:
 

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OK did I miss something? I read the entire post and didn't see what caused the problem was. I take it wasn't the rear tire, or the final drive, so what did you determine was the problem? Just wondering,,,,
 

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They say half the fun of a trip is in the planning..
.. is that true?:roll:

;-) ;-) ;-) ;-) ;-)
Dennis
All the fun of a trip is the planning...

until you put the kickstand up and twist the throttle! Then the adventure begins.

My thoughts exactly, but you said it better than anyone. :thumbup:
..And therein lies the magic.:bow:

I wish I could meditate on a candle flame.
I cannot.
.. but sit me on the bike knowing i've got nothing else to do for another one thousand or two thousand miles and bingo,
just like that, I'm in that indescribable magic "zone".

Hope you get another shot at the moonshine run.

Dennis

Both of you gentlemen have me all fired up for another long ride and I may not be able to wait til May 4th for an anticipated RTE to Cincinnati to help a 65 year old friend celebrate a half marathon run.

Being the cert ***** that I am, I may up and do a SS1000 to TN and back this weekend. The anticipation of the wonderful scent of springtime, the greening of the scenery, and the warm Southern breezes is the main driving urge.

gramps
 

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OK did I miss something? I read the entire post and didn't see what caused the problem was. I take it wasn't the rear tire, or the final drive, so what did you determine was the problem? Just wondering,,,,
I am confused as well. Near as I can tell there was no problem but I am somehow missing why he thought there was a problem. I 'think' he may be complaining about the heaviness of the Wing compared to his FJR? Buuuuttt, why scrub the trip when there was no problem????
 

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Nice write-up. I've been in similar situation. :lol:

Once, just the opposite. Went to Sturgis, 3 months before the rally and nearly all 2-lane roads on a bike with no windshield or saddlebags. The Wife was OK with that. What she wasn't OK with was the fact that I just kept on going...... No cell service for several days and when I did have service, I discovered 16 voice mail messages from the lovely wife... each more pleasant than the last. :shock:
 

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...Once, just the opposite. Went to Sturgis, 3 months before the rally and nearly all 2-lane roads on a bike with no windshield or saddlebags. The Wife was OK with that. What she wasn't OK with was the fact that I just kept on going...... No cell service for several days and when I did have service, I discovered 16 voice mail messages from the lovely wife... each more pleasant than the last.
Been there, done that! Went on 3 week cross country ride, and girlfriend freaked out because I only surfaced about once a week or so, due to lack of cell/web access.
 

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A similar feeling happened to me a couple months ago, I thought for sure the time to see what zero pressure really felt like, but the tire was just low in pressure.

Sent from my teeny screen using my big fat fingers!
 

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OK did I miss something? I read the entire post and didn't see what caused the problem was. I take it wasn't the rear tire, or the final drive, so what did you determine was the problem? Just wondering,,,,
Yeah, lets hear the rest of the story.:shrug::shrug:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yeah, lets hear the rest of the story.:shrug::shrug:
Bottom line: the "problem" was the rider, not the bike! My perception/interpretation of what I was experiencing was wrong.

I jumped to a wrong conclusion before examining all the facts - like actually checking the air pressure! Duh.
Thinking (incorrectly) that the tire was low (or worse) and not knowing how long I'd been riding on it in that condition, I concluded that it would be unwise to put an additional 3,000 miles on it. Therefore, I decided that I'd need to find a motorcycle/tire shop during business hours in the morning.

Instead of leaving for Moonshine at 0300, I slept until later - and didn't discover the perfectly good tire until 0730.

Since the timetable for my goal (SS2k) was now 5 hours behind, I snatched defeat from the jaws of victory and headed west toward the coast.

"An embarrassing Imaginary flat is still better than a Real flat."
 

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Bottom line: the "problem" was the rider, not the bike! My perception/interpretation of what I was experiencing was wrong.

I jumped to a wrong conclusion before examining all the facts - like actually checking the air pressure! Duh.
Thinking (incorrectly) that the tire was low (or worse) and not knowing how long I'd been riding on it in that condition, I concluded that it would be unwise to put an additional 3,000 miles on it. Therefore, I decided that I'd need to find a motorcycle/tire shop during business hours in the morning.

Instead of leaving for Moonshine at 0300, I slept until later - and didn't discover the perfectly good tire until 0730.

Since the timetable for my goal (SS2k) was now 5 hours behind, I snatched defeat from the jaws of victory and headed west toward the coast.

"An embarrassing Imaginary flat is still better than a Real flat."
You got that right!:thumbup:
 
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