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Discussion Starter #1
I know that this is a very specific question but it looks like I will have to put my 2018 Goldwing DCT Tour on a utility trailer that I own to transport it from the dealership home. Would love to ride it but it might just be easier trailering it. For those of you that have trailered your 2018, have you had any problems unloading the bike? I was concerned if the weight of the bike might make it difficult unloading. I have never done it with the Goldwing so when I back it off the trailer would rear assist be useful?

Thanks
 

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I sometimes take mine in a toyhauler. It has a steep ramp compared to most utility trailers. Make sure you have enough clearance where the ramp meets the trailer to not high center the bike.



When I unload mine from the toyhauler I lean it to the left and keep my hand on the front brake and foot on the rear brake. Previous experience has shown me that just the front brake isn't enough, the front tire will just slide down the ramp, gotta use rear brake too.


The biggest problem is when the front tire is still on the ramp and rear tire is on the ground the bike gets a lot taller and can get tall enough where I (6'1") can't reach the ground. I usually get to the point where I almost can't reach the ground/ramp and then let it roll freely until the front wheel reaches the ground. Riding backwards.


With the DCT I leave it running and in drive in case I need to pull back up. Just a thought that with it running if you lock up the front brake the anti lock may release it and let it roll, however the linked brakes my not allow this to happen. Don't want to find out.


Anyway I have a real steep ramp and this may not be a problem for your purposes. Probably wouldn't hurt to have someone to help unload the first time. Good luck and enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I sometimes take mine in a toyhauler. It has a steep ramp compared to most utility trailers. Make sure you have enough clearance where the ramp meets the trailer to not high center the bike.



When I unload mine from the toyhauler I lean it to the left and keep my hand on the front brake and foot on the rear brake. Previous experience has shown me that just the front brake isn't enough, the front tire will just slide down the ramp, gotta use rear brake too.


The biggest problem is when the front tire is still on the ramp and rear tire is on the ground the bike gets a lot taller and can get tall enough where I (6'1") can't reach the ground. I usually get to the point where I almost can't reach the ground/ramp and then let it roll freely until the front wheel reaches the ground. Riding backwards.


With the DCT I leave it running and in drive in case I need to pull back up. Just a thought that with it running if you lock up the front brake the anti lock may release it and let it roll, however the linked brakes my not allow this to happen. Don't want to find out.


Anyway I have a real steep ramp and this may not be a problem for your purposes. Probably wouldn't hurt to have someone to help unload the first time. Good luck and enjoy.

Thank you very much. I will grab a few friends to help me when I unload.
 

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Just did this with mine. I also had to make sure I had enough clearance with a longer ramp and a less incline angle. Not a lot of room under the GW. Also, and maybe more importantly, I found that it was difficult to find good tie down locations on the bike. I used my 'canyon dancer bar-harness' to tie down the front handle bars giving me some piece of mind on the way home.
 

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Typically when I trailer the bike going on or off I use the Walk mode. I straddle the bike vs sit on it as it is going up or down to avoid compressing the suspension. I raise the front end of the trailer with the trailer stand while it is still attached to the hitch, this helps decrease the angle and I put a 2x4 under the bottom of the ramp to also help decrease the angle. Have been able to load and unload this way without assistance. Did it the same way when I had my 2012.
 

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We use an enclosed tandem axle utility trailer with ramp door.
I ride it in/out and use walking mode to get onto ramp. Either walking mode or dragging brake while going down ramp.



If using a light trailer and wanting to have trailer disconnected from tow unit (perhaps to raise the front of trailer), be sure to use blocks at the rear to prevent the tipping trailer backwards as bike exits.
 

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I know that this is a very specific question but it looks like I will have to put my 2018 Goldwing DCT Tour on a utility trailer that I own to transport it from the dealership home. Would love to ride it but it might just be easier trailering it. For those of you that have trailered your 2018, have you had any problems unloading the bike? I was concerned if the weight of the bike might make it difficult unloading. I have never done it with the Goldwing so when I back it off the trailer would rear assist be useful?

Thanks
Rear walking speed mode works great for getting the 18 DCT out of a utility trailer by yourself. Been there, done that.

:doorag:
 

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As to braking on an incline: the brake closest to the bottom of the incline is the one that will stop a motorcycle. In this case, backing down a ramp, use the rear brake.
 

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Just did this with mine. I also had to make sure I had enough clearance with a longer ramp and a less incline angle. Not a lot of room under the GW. Also, and maybe more importantly, I found that it was difficult to find good tie down locations on the bike. I used my 'canyon dancer bar-harness' to tie down the front handle bars giving me some piece of mind on the way home.
Handle bars are not a good tie down point.
Use the top of the yoke that holds the front wheel. 2 soft ties (one going each side) connected to rachet straps is the way to go.
 

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Handle bars are not a good tie down point.
Use the top of the yoke that holds the front wheel. 2 soft ties (one going each side) connected to rachet straps is the way to go.
^^ THIS!!

2 soft ties and 2 ratchet straps. Depending on how far away from the bike you secure the other end of the strap, you MIGHT need a soft cloth to go between the strap and the bike's bodywork. ALWAYS secure the strap on the left FIRST and remove it LAST. If you remove it first, there is a VERY good chance the bike will fall over on the right...no side stand to catch it.

A front wheel chock is VERY helpful, too. If you don't have a chock, use SOMETHING to keep the front wheel straight.

I hope your utility trailer has a ramp. If so, it will likely be a low break over angle at the top of the ramp. Very little chance of scraping the bottom or the bike getting away from you, especially in walking mode.

There are a few threads on the 2018 forum about tying down the new wing.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
^^ THIS!!

2 soft ties and 2 ratchet straps. Depending on how far away from the bike you secure the other end of the strap, you MIGHT need a soft cloth to go between the strap and the bike's bodywork. ALWAYS secure the strap on the left FIRST and remove it LAST. If you remove it first, there is a VERY good chance the bike will fall over on the right...no side stand to catch it.

A front wheel chock is VERY helpful, too. If you don't have a chock, use SOMETHING to keep the front wheel straight.

I hope your utility trailer has a ramp. If so, it will likely be a low break over angle at the top of the ramp. Very little chance of scraping the bottom or the bike getting away from you, especially in walking mode.

There are a few threads on the 2018 forum about tying down the new wing.
I do have a front wheel chock on my trailer. My worry is the angle on tailgate of the trailer. When I was unloading a previous bike that I own, the angle was too steep and at one point I could barely touch ground "ramp". That was very scary. I will add some 2x4s to change the angle and hopefully that will make it easier to back out. Thanks
 

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^^ THIS!!

2 soft ties and 2 ratchet straps. Depending on how far away from the bike you secure the other end of the strap, you MIGHT need a soft cloth to go between the strap and the bike's bodywork. ALWAYS secure the strap on the left FIRST and remove it LAST. If you remove it first, there is a VERY good chance the bike will fall over on the right...no side stand to catch it.

A front wheel chock is VERY helpful, too. If you don't have a chock, use SOMETHING to keep the front wheel straight.

I hope your utility trailer has a ramp. If so, it will likely be a low break over angle at the top of the ramp. Very little chance of scraping the bottom or the bike getting away from you, especially in walking mode.

There are a few threads on the 2018 forum about tying down the new wing.
Also slide a couple 2x6's across under the engine before you tighten it down, then it won't compress the shocks and will be rock solid. YMMV
 

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My utility trailer is chiefly used to transport my slope mower, so my ramps are long and heavy duty. They have the curved top so as to avoid bottoming. My slope mower has dual tires front and rear, so I have 4 of the ramps. I use 3 with the bike, that gives me one for the bike and one on each side for my feet and
I can ride it up and down no different than going up and down the driveway. Those ramps are not too expensive at Tractor Supply and make this a very safe experience. To tie down I use the Condor wheel chock up front and two straps to the rear.

prs
 

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GoldSrike has tie down accessory. Reasonable price, easy install.

My tail gate isn't nearly as steep as the video posted yet my bike wont make it up the trailer ramp in walking mode.
It didn't the day I purchased it and it still doesn't. I have to have the bike in 1st gear to get up the ramp.
Local dealer was surprised but watched it not load - perhaps the governor needs adjusting. lol I haven't ridden a mini bike or go-kart in years but they were a lot of fun before obtaining my drivers license. And by adjusting I meant pushing that sucker so as to ignore the spring that kept wanting to go slower.
 

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GoldSrike has tie down accessory. Reasonable price, easy install.

My tail gate isn't nearly as steep as the video posted yet my bike wont make it up the trailer ramp in walking mode.
It didn't the day I purchased it and it still doesn't. I have to have the bike in 1st gear to get up the ramp.
Local dealer was surprised but watched it not load - perhaps the governor needs adjusting. lol I haven't ridden a mini bike or go-kart in years but they were a lot of fun before obtaining my drivers license. And by adjusting I meant pushing that sucker so as to ignore the spring that kept wanting to go slower.

I've found that when walking mode encounters an obstacle, that it sometimes will 'stall out' -- but if the button is held it will then apply more throttle and clutch to overcome the obstacle.


But, for loading with a ramp I just leave it auto and drive it up into the trailer.
 
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