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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a nice ramp for back of pickup but did not think about front wheel chock. I wondered about using Canyon Dancer to keep wheel straight by fastening the hooks to either frame or foot rests. I did not want to drill holes in bed of truck to fasten wheel chock. Perhaps some of you that have carried your bike in the back of pickup truck might have some suggestions. Your help is appreciated.
 

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I've often thought about this issue were I to ever own a pickup truck.

I too would be averse to drilling holes in the bed.

Why not build a simple, sturdy frame out of 2 x 4s. It could be built to simply hold the front wheel vertically, and extensions to the sides of the bed to prevent lateral movement?

Just tossin' ideas.

Tim
 

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I have a Harbor Freight wheel chock. I mounted it to a 3/4"x12"x 96" piece of plywood. When the bike is in the chock the rear wheel holds the plywood in place. Then just tie down as if it were on a trailer.
Go ahead and use the canyon dancer strap. But I suggest you get Max's steel pin first.
No I do not recommend using any straps on the handlebars.
 

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The steel pin that Max is promoting won't prevent the steering shaft from breaking from undue force on the handlebars, it has clearance in the aluminum bore and doesn't carry any load until AFTER the shaft breaks. It will hold things in place after the shaft breaks so you can steer safely to the side of the road.
 

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Modern full size PU trucks have pretty tall beds. You wil long and curved ramps to avoid saddlebagging your bike where the ramps meet the tailgate.

prs
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I was looking for advice doing a search and found a lot of older posts that had some great information. I have a short bed 5.5', so with tail gate down I will place 3/4"plywood the length of bed to the end of the tailgate. I will mount wheel chock to front end of plywood and secure the bike and tailgate to the box. I have a trailer but difficult finding a place for it. Last year it cost $175 to store my trailer outside not to mention the hassle of dropping trailer and picking it up 14 miles each way. My truck can get 20mpg on the expressway but drops to less than 10 pulling the trailer with a bike in it. I am guessing I might get 15mpg with just the bike. Why does my rear tire rotate backwards when I have strapped the bike down. I was desperate to get a couple extra straps on the bike and looped the wheel from each side. Upon arrival those straps had moved to the front of the wheel as the wheel had rotated backwards.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Modern full size PU trucks have pretty tall beds. You wil long and curved ramps to avoid saddlebagging your bike where the ramps meet the tailgate.

prs
This ramp was rated well on Amazon and I bought it -

 

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I was looking for advice doing a search and found a lot of older posts that had some great information. I have a short bed 5.5', so with tail gate down I will place 3/4"plywood the length of bed to the end of the tailgate. I will mount wheel chock to front end of plywood and secure the bike and tailgate to the box. I have a trailer but difficult finding a place for it. Last year it cost $175 to store my trailer outside not to mention the hassle of dropping trailer and picking it up 14 miles each way. My truck can get 20mpg on the expressway but drops to less than 10 pulling the trailer with a bike in it. I am guessing I might get 15mpg with just the bike. Why does my rear tire rotate backwards when I have strapped the bike down. I was desperate to get a couple extra straps on the bike and looped the wheel from each side. Upon arrival those straps had moved to the front of the wheel as the wheel had rotated backwards.
I thought I'd add a comment about the canyon dancer. You were concerned about the front wheel turning one way or the other. Once you install a wheel chock, the wheel cannot turn either way. The only issue is tying the bike down. I understand about the trailer and storage frustrations. Not sure what's going on with your rear wheel, but once you get a decent wheel chock, every thing changes. Now the wheel chock holds the bike upright. So... How do plan to tie the bike down?
 

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I trailer two motorcycles from Canada to the southern USA every fall and return in the spring, both wheels of both bikes rotate backwards leaving skid marks under each tire. Not sure of the physics involved there but it happens, just deal with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have a wheel chock that I will fix to the sheet of plywood. My truck is 5 years old and has the trailer package. The bed has standard points down low and I also have tie downs (ford option) that mount mid-wall. I didn't think about the sheet of plywood but found suggestion on the general forum. Apparently at 70mph the bike can damage the cables or even bow in some tailgates making them difficult to close. The sheet of wood sounds like a good solution. I have the Gold Strike front brackets that are well located. I am going to remove side panels and soft tie forward (?). I also have the 2020 grab rails which make tying down the bike feel pretty secure.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I trailer two motorcycles from Canada to the southern USA every fall and return in the spring, both wheels of both bikes rotate backwards leaving skid marks under each tire. Not sure of the physics involved there but it happens, just deal with it.
Funny that there is enough force to cause rear tire to leave rubber skid marks. My plan is to not try stopping the rotation by tying off the wheel. Instead I will use the frame and new grab rails and believe that it will be effective.
 

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The steel pin that Max is promoting won't prevent the steering shaft from breaking from undue force on the handlebars, it has clearance in the aluminum bore and doesn't carry any load until AFTER the shaft breaks. It will hold things in place after the shaft breaks so you can steer safely to the side of the road.
I was being sarcastic if you didn't catch that. Never use the handlebars to tie the bike down.
 

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I recently purchased a nice ramp for back of pickup but did not think about front wheel chock. I wondered about using Canyon Dancer to keep wheel straight by fastening the hooks to either frame or foot rests. I did not want to drill holes in bed of truck to fasten wheel chock. Perhaps some of you that have carried your bike in the back of pickup truck might have some suggestions. Your help is appreciated.
I have seen too many bikes fall bottom out and crash to the ground when loading with ramps into pickups. The only way I would do it is with a lift such as a Rampage.
 

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I recently purchased a nice ramp for back of pickup but did not think about front wheel chock. I wondered about using Canyon Dancer to keep wheel straight by fastening the hooks to either frame or foot rests. I did not want to drill holes in bed of truck to fasten wheel chock. Perhaps some of you that have carried your bike in the back of pickup truck might have some suggestions. Your help is appreciated.
Not sure what your truck set up is or what your budget is but your question prompted me to do a bit of looking around since I am curious and looking for a solution myself. Would something like this provide what you need? Notwithstanding that you have already committed to a ramp and you don't want to modify your truck bed. Just throwing it out there.

 

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Discussion Starter #18
I have 10' long ramp - my problem is that I have 5.5' bed. I think that loader needs 8'. Looks good.
 

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nevermind......
 
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