GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,000 Posts
well that did not take long,hahahahaha


no the tire plug failed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
well that did not take long,hahahahaha


no the tire plug failed
No, The human failed, 70 mph on a tire he knows is damaged and feels spongy. C-mon! I am sure glad they were just bruised.

Looks like that wasnt one of those dunlop D3's that handle just fine when flat.:roll:

Look, as soon as someone has a big issue with a car tire all of us wont hear the end of that either. Its just the way things are YW.

If it wasnt for Leftwingers post I would have never read that, So thanks for shareing Leftwinger...:yes1:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,539 Posts
Wonder why it made it's way over to this forum? Don't think it has much to do with the DS... Cheers...:doorag:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
No, The human failed, 70 mph on a tire he knows is damaged and feels spongy. C-mon! I am sure glad they were just bruised.

Looks like that wasnt one of those dunlop D3's that handle just fine when flat.:roll:

Look, as soon as someone has a big issue with a car tire all of us wont hear the end of that either. Its just the way things are YW.

If it wasnt for Leftwingers post I would have never read that, So thanks for shareing Leftwinger...:yes1:
No sweat. And just for comparison, I once, on purpose, took my Wing out on 178 with my old Pirelli runflat at ZERO pressure and ran it up to 65 mph and rode it. Just to see what would happen. I could have easily ran it up to 70 if I wanted. I haven't tried it with the Conti yet and by at least one report on the DS board they do not perform as well??? Unknown. Anyway, I know you can ride, one up, with a Pirelli RF AT with no drama whatsoever. If the guy had had one on he would still have his motorcycle in one piece.

Yeah, the guy crashed because he didn't have a car tire. The tire on his bike did not just "lose pressure" around a "bad plug". The tire felt spongy for awhile, but when it let go, it let go catastrophically. IOW, it was a blowout. The carcass failed, shredded, or popped with a sudden loss of control.

No way that happens with a runflat car tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
I just smell a plain old TROLL, I see you hiding under that bridge..............laen you do know that pulling a trailer with your motorcycle is very very dangerous, and not condoned by the manufacturer, so please be careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
Directly from the Bushtec owners manual:

"NO MOTORCYCLE MANUFACTURER HAS APPROVED OR ENDORSED
BUSHTEC MFG. & SALES, INC., ITS PRODUCTS, TRAILERS, OR HITCHES.
USE OF A TRAILER OR TRAILER HITCH ON ANY MOTORCYCLE COULD
VOID YOUR WARRANTY AND MAY INCRESE YOUR CHANCES OF INJURY
IN AN ACCIDENT SITUATION.


WARNING:
TOWING A TRAILER BEHIND A MOTORCYCLE INCREASES THE

LIKELIHOOD OF INJURY OR DEATH TO BOTH OPERATOR AND PASSENGER

DUE TO INCREASED RISK AND EXPOSURE."


Specifically designing a product to be used on a vehicle that the manufacturer
specifically states should not be used because the vehicle was not specifically
designed to have said specific product installed or used and would be specifically
dangerous to do so.


I'm all for doing whatever you want with YOUR motorcycle, but you can't have it both ways. :roll:

Oh and.......way to step in it on the original post

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
Good thread! I have to admit the more people argue about the detriment of car tires without following logic or common courtesy the more I anxiously wait the day I can figure out how to start riding with a more durable tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,013 Posts
Laen....Just another word for instigator! (sp?)

He would like nothing better than to see this forum disappear.

Just ignore him and he will go on to other forums and mess with them.

JMHO :agree:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
No sweat. And just for comparison, I once, on purpose, took my Wing out on 178 with my old Pirelli runflat at ZERO pressure and ran it up to 65 mph and rode it. Just to see what would happen. I could have easily ran it up to 70 if I wanted. I haven't tried it with the Conti yet and by at least one report on the DS board they do not perform as well??? Unknown. Anyway, I know you can ride, one up, with a Pirelli RF AT with no drama whatsoever. If the guy had had one on he would still have his motorcycle in one piece.

Yeah, the guy crashed because he didn't have a car tire. The tire on his bike did not just "lose pressure" around a "bad plug". The tire felt spongy for awhile, but when it let go, it let go catastrophically. IOW, it was a blowout. The carcass failed, shredded, or popped with a sudden loss of control.

No way that happens with a runflat car tire.
So if you are riding on run flats....how do you
know they are flat...with out checking pressure...
and how far can you ride....
and will a run flat eventually break down...

These questions may have already been answered in
other posts..not sure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,539 Posts
So if you are riding on run flats....how do you
know they are flat...with out checking pressure...
and how far can you ride....
and will a run flat eventually break down...

These questions may have already been answered in
other posts..not sure

The steering starts to get real heavy. If you had to you could probably ride 60 plus miles at 50 or 60 mph. I'm guessing, but you are probably running only about 60% on the rear tire the weight of one tire on an average car. From time to time you do need to put the bike on the center stand and check the tire for damage from road hazards. Also, the pressures need to be checked once a week on both tires. Cheers....:doorag:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,624 Posts
So if you are riding on run flats....how do you
know they are flat...with out checking pressure...
and how far can you ride....
and will a run flat eventually break down...

These questions may have already been answered in
other posts..not sure
Hi everyone, back for a visit.

I think it is a lot like many other things. Common sense. I took my Kumho for a short ride around the block with no air just to see. You can feel the tire act up in the corners, so you will be aware something is not right if you were to gain a flat.

I would think if you do run a Run Flat for a distance of 30 or 50 miles or more to get to a repair shop, that damage is done to the structural part of the tire. I know if you run it for a long time it will just fly apart, eventually.

So for peace of mind, using it for its purpose to prevent a puncture or road damage cut to cause it to blow out, would also I think require a new tire if rode for any distance flat. That is how I would look at it anyway.


Folks I know why your resident troll is back. I will not elaborate on that any further. But I see the forum in danger again. If none of you have the will power to just ignore a person who wishes to cause trouble and would like nothing better to see the entire Darkside Forum banished, just keep it up. There is a lot of good information on this forum, a lot of experience and knowledge, much of it can be very useful to those who wish to use a CT or even discuss no using one and or come to learn. And to make their own decisions. All that is cool.

This other thing needs to just disappear. It is firing up again. Banter, good natured teasing, nonsense is all cool. But there is a motive behind what is happening, think about it.

Respectfully

Kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
So if you are riding on run flats....how do you
know they are flat...with out checking pressure...
and how far can you ride....
and will a run flat eventually break down...

These questions may have already been answered in
other posts..not sure
They have been, at least partially, but I don't read every thread over here.
Doesn't matter, never hurts to answer them again.

I only rode about two miles when I did it. I had a nail in the tire so I pulled it and tried to plug the tire. Unfortunately, the size rope plug I had was too big. I didn't want to drill it out more or otherwise mess with the tire, so I just hopped on the bike and rode it flat to my local tire store where they plugged it for me.

You can DEFINITELY tell that you have a flat in the back. Roll resistance goes WAY up. When I back out of my garage in the AM I can feel the resistance as I push with my feet. That tells me all I need to know.

We had one report from a guy who rode a different brand runflat and he rode his as much as 200 miles on it with little to no pressure. STILL NO CATASTROPHIC FAILURE. But the tire was ruined when he checked it at the end of the day. Personally, I do not know how a guy could not KNOW he was that severely low on air, however. I can feel it big time. I can tell just by how the bike responds that I need to air it up. YMMV.

We have had a couple of guys who have had the Conti runflats lose pressure and they DID NOT LIKE the behavior of the tire. One guy says he thinks the E3 ELITE Dunlop MC performs better if it suffers a puncture than the Conti. I used to run the E3 on my bike and my only real complaint was that I thought the hard compound used sort of made the tire easier to break the rear end loose. That, and it made a lot of racket in turns. Anyway, I have been really happy with the Conti VR that I am running now. It feels a lot less like a car tire to me than the Pirelli and it really inspires confidence in the corners as far as I am concerned. Neither of the two guys who reported dissatisfaction with the Conti in a runflat situation lost control or wrecked. Still, I am going to evaluate their experiences as part of the big picture when it comes time to replace the Conti.

For the record. I ran that Pirelli another 10K miles with a plug in it without ONE incident or problem. Essentially, moving to the runflat car tire has provided me an extra margin of safety in loss of pressure situations, provides pretty awe-inspiring grip and braking, took away most of my deceleration wobble, vastly improves the rear end handling of the bike on dirt and gravel and, in particular, rain, and increased the longevity of the rear so that I can now ride the bike on one set of shoes for the life of the front tire. When the front gets to the wear bars I just swap them both out. Others might do differently and to each their own. Also, for the record, I have been so happy with the performance of the Bridgestone G-709 in the front that I have no desire to swap that out for anything else at this time. The G-709 is a perfect match for either the Conti or the Pirelli, IMHO.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top