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Just wondering what everyone thinks of Mac Tools and the guys that sell in those trucks. Do you think that they are a good buy and do they work good for motorcycle repair. Wondering if it would be a good career? and if I would have time to ride?

Thanks for your input.
 

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These are good quality tools. As for the franchise.........you will be up at least against Snap-On. You also end up carrying accounts receivable as a lot of mechanics will pay you weekly, and you will probably confront some dead beats. I once worked for an airline that insisted mechanics use ONLY Snap-On. Someone was getting paid off.
 

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I used to be a Mac Tool man. The tools are excellent and Mac has had problems in the past. Do some research not sure if they have corrected the internal problems but hope they have by now. Good Luck.
 

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Been a tech my entire life and I've got lots of Mac tools in my toolbox. (amongst a variety of other brands) They are a quality product and I wouldn't hesitate to purchase more if needed. Can't help you on the Franchise aspect.
 

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Know a guy...

He a dealer for them. Don't know anyting about the financials or the pay or the perks, but it seems he spends lots of hours a week in/around that truck. Maybe that will help answer your riding time question...
 

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Just wondering what everyone thinks of Mac Tools and the guys that sell in those trucks. Do you think that they are a good buy and do they work good for motorcycle repair. Wondering if it would be a good career? and if I would have time to ride?

Thanks for your input.
Like someone above mentioned Mac doesn't have the management team that Snap-On has. Mac is a good tool, but one doesn't get much help from them in the management area. Yes they give you some training, but very little followup after you are out in the field. Snap-On has managers out in the field that can assist a distributor with any issues. Mac doesn't come close to having this management tool. Yeah, you can call the Mac office, but that isn't like having an experienced manager near you. Mac had two type of distributors and I assume they still have...........first is the traditional distributor which means you must have investment money to get in the business and you are totally responsible for the business because it is yours. You must buy the tools, truck and cover expenses which is a huge investment. The second type of distributor was the company distributor which in essence you are working for Mac receiving a salary and Mac furnishes the truck, tools and covers the expenses. Selling tools isn't a big problem because the majority of it is on credit to the mechanic and one must collect weekly which is a hassle in it's self. Mechanics are very transit........they move at the drop of a hat and you will be chasing your money constantly if you can even find them. A lot of tool-men work Monday thru Friday and then chase dead-beats on Saturday if they can find them. One must have excellent management skills and even better collection abilities to survive in the tool business. At any time, a tool-man has an estimated $18 to $25,000 dollars (credit amount) out on the street. After looking at both programs, Mac and Snap-On my choice would be Snap-On, but that's just me. If one manages the business well, the business will consume 60 to 80 hours per week I'm told.
 
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