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I have gone through numerous different windshields on my Gold Wings looking for better protection. They all have been disappointing in various ways so the next step was a Madstad.

Quality of materials: First impression is that the materials are well made and of high quality.

Installation: Pretty straightforward if you have ever replaced a GL1800 windshield. I did this replacement, including assembly of the various Madstad pieces, in about 30 minutes.

First ride: The black steel windshield brackets were a bit of a concern at first as they are part of the windshield and in the line of vision, especially at low speeds when I'm looking close to the bike. Once on the road, however, I never noticed the brackets at all. Immediately, I noticed a much quieter pocket of air around me than I have been used to with other shields. Perhaps the only shield comparable in protection was a Tulsa extra tall that I experimented with years ago. Experimenting with the various settings possible with the Madstad was going to be interesting.

Ride #1, a 300 miler: It was a fairly calm day, by North Dakota standards, so I did not get a good test of crosswind protection and stability which are big concerns of mine. I fiddled with various height and angle settings 3 or 4 times. The settings are easy to change but you must be stopped to manually adjust the height and angle. No tools are needed. It is possible to adjust the view (through it or over it) and airflow over a significant range....very impressive. In the highest and most vertical position, the cockpit air is very calm so, hopefully, this gives the passenger a much quieter and smoother environment than before. I eventually settled on the lowest position with the screen raked back fully as this allowed me to look over the screen and yet it moved enough air for me to be comfortable.

Ride #2, 250 miles: A very windy day common of North Dakota and a good test of the Madstad's true capabilities. First of all, significantly less crosswind gets around the Madstad to the rider than with other shields. I am pleased! When going into the wind, however, wind gusts have a noticeable effect of pushing back against the bike creating an almost surging sensation for the bike. Obviously, because this screen moves more air it is going to affect the bike in some ways and one of those effects is fuel economy which has possibly decreased by 2 mpg with the Madstad.

Cleaning is not as easy as a F4 and the metal brackets are in the way. Someday, I'll find out how the Madstad performs in rain. I don't like the look of the bracketed double-screen shields but, for me, performance always wins over style and so far it works.
 

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I have gone through numerous different windshields on my Gold Wings looking for better protection. They all have been disappointing in various ways so the next step was a Madstad.

Quality of materials: First impression is that the materials are well made and of high quality.

Installation: Pretty straightforward if you have ever replaced a GL1800 windshield. I did this replacement, including assembly of the various Madstad pieces, in about 30 minutes.

First ride: The black steel windshield brackets were a bit of a concern at first as they are part of the windshield and in the line of vision, especially at low speeds when I'm looking close to the bike. Once on the road, however, I never noticed the brackets at all. Immediately, I noticed a much quieter pocket of air around me than I have been used to with other shields. Perhaps the only shield comparable in protection was a Tulsa extra tall that I experimented with years ago. Experimenting with the various settings possible with the Madstad was going to be interesting.

Ride #1, a 300 miler: It was a fairly calm day, by North Dakota standards, so I did not get a good test of crosswind protection and stability which are big concerns of mine. I fiddled with various height and angle settings 3 or 4 times. The settings are easy to change but you must be stopped to manually adjust the height and angle. No tools are needed. It is possible to adjust the view (through it or over it) and airflow over a significant range....very impressive. In the highest and most vertical position, the cockpit air is very calm so, hopefully, this gives the passenger a much quieter and smoother environment than before. I eventually settled on the lowest position with the screen raked back fully as this allowed me to look over the screen and yet it moved enough air for me to be comfortable.

Ride #2, 250 miles: A very windy day common of North Dakota and a good test of the Madstad's true capabilities. First of all, significantly less crosswind gets around the Madstad to the rider than with other shields. I am pleased! When going into the wind, however, wind gusts have a noticeable effect of pushing back against the bike creating an almost surging sensation for the bike. Obviously, because this screen moves more air it is going to affect the bike in some ways and one of those effects is fuel economy which has possibly decreased by 2 mpg with the Madstad.

Cleaning is not as easy as a F4 and the metal brackets are in the way. Someday, I'll find out how the Madstad performs in rain. I don't like the look of the bracketed double-screen shields but, for me, performance always wins over style and so far it works.
I've mentioned this before, I think Madstads shield height recommendations based on your height is way OFF. I followed their recommendations and purchased a 16" shield for my F6B and I could barely see over it in the full down position.

I installed their 12" screen, adjusted it up 2" from full down position and the wind protection was just as good as the taller screen. Also the bike looked a lot better with the smaller screen.

My experience with the Madstad is that a taller screen does not mean better wind protection.
 

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Could you guys with Madstads please tell us how they do protecting the instrument cluster and handlebar-mounted electronics in the rain? The stock windshield will deflect most of the water when moving, although it will bead along the edge and you'll get a few windblown droplets coming back at you. But when moving the instrument area is fairly well protected. When stopped all bets are off, of course. Is the Madstad the same, better, worse?
 

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I have ridden my F6B through all kinds of rain, Light, Moderate, Downpours and unfortunately Hail.

In Light to Moderate continuous rain the rider remains pretty much dry while moving behind a Madstad. This is with the shield adjusted so that I'm looking over the top edge. Rain drops that collect at the top edge of the shield are lifted up & over the rider by the air flowing up the backside of the shield.

A downpour will overwhelm the Madstad as it does all other shield designs. In my opinion the Madstad rain protection is superior when riding over a long period in Light to Moderate rain.
 

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I, too, am enjoying my new Madstad.

No good dousing yet, but in light rain, it does fine.

I've been using a Windbender for a while. When I was running with the rake kit, it was a 2 or 3mpg hit. I haven't quantified the Madstad yet.

I don't even notice the brackets.
 

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I have noticed all effects mentioned in the above posts. I also got caught last year in a few rainy days. The one was 300 miles in steady rain. Light rain is ok but, anything else you will get some degree of wet. The madstad does everything better than my previous shields but, wet weather protection is better on a one piece shield, period!
 

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It seems counter-intuitive that a Madstad would reduce fuel mpg. At highway speeds the overwhelming factor in MPG is frontal area and parasitic drag and the Madstad reduces both compared an old-fashioned barn door type windscreen. I don't have reliable before and after MPG figures however and can't produce data one way or the other.
 

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@dduelin it's been an eternity since I took that fluid mechanics course, but effective frontal area is a LOT more than just the frontal areas in any kind of a visible size thing. My hunch is that the non-aerodynamic wall of the raked up Windbender hurt me much more than the slightly larger frontal area from the change of the angle of attack of an unraked Windbender, and even more than the larger but more aero (for mpg) OEM shield. I expect to see slight changes from fiddling with Madstad rake, too. Perhaps less pronounced.

It's always tough to measure in real life because mileage is so variable for so many factors, but I wouldn't be surprised if there was a 1/2 mpg difference just from hand winds closed vs. neutral. I briefly pondered trying to quantify that in a controlled experiment, but decided it was easier to up my meds.
 

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@dduelin it's been an eternity since I took that fluid mechanics course, but effective frontal area is a LOT more than just the frontal areas in any kind of a visible size thing. My hunch is that the non-aerodynamic wall of the raked up Windbender hurt me much more than the slightly larger frontal area from the change of the angle of attack of an unraked Windbender, and even more than the larger but more aero (for mpg) OEM shield. I expect to see slight changes from fiddling with Madstad rake, too. Perhaps less pronounced.

It's always tough to measure in real life because mileage is so variable for so many factors, but I wouldn't be surprised if there was a 1/2 mpg difference just from hand winds closed vs. neutral. I briefly pondered trying to quantify that in a controlled experiment, but decided it was easier to up my meds.
Because the Madstad promotes and maintains laminar flow in order to reduce vortices spilling around the top and edges my hunch is that parasitic drag is less than a OEM type shield creates. Laminar flow is much less costly in terms of drag compared to punching a hole through the air and pulling all those eddies and swirls along. Motorcycles have terrible coefficients of drag however and in total you may be right.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
A 2 mpg reduction only amounts to 10 miles on a 5 gallon fill of gas and that is easily within the normal tank to tank variability of fuel economy for a Gold Wing. The next ride could easily give different results.
 

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Haven't checked MPG since I put my madstad on, but I noticed right away it slipped through the air a lot smoother.
 

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Is the Madstad acrylic or polycarbonate?
 

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Because the Madstad promotes and maintains laminar flow in order to reduce vortices spilling around the top and edges my hunch is that parasitic drag is less than a OEM type shield creates. Laminar flow is much less costly in terms of drag compared to punching a hole through the air and pulling all those eddies and swirls along. Motorcycles have terrible coefficients of drag however and in total you may be right.
It's been a while since I rode with an OEM shield.

Compared to the Windbender, things do seem more laminar as I feel around the edge of my bubble. I had the model with the curve at the top which seemed like a good idea at the time I bought it. I mostly got used to the slight visual distortion but over time I just kept thinking more and more about the eddies it must have been throwing off.
 

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I recently added the madstad to my F6B replacing a Klockwerks. The madstad give a good flow of clean air with no buffeting at all. The Klockwerks looked cooler but I got buffeting Along with no air when it was hot.
 

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Get a 5 gal. bucket,put a rod through a can or something round so spins
Put it on top the 5 gal. Bucket with peanut butter on the can,put water or anti freeze in the bottom on bucket
They will go for the peanut butter on the can and spin in into bucket and they will be history
 

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Get a 5 gal. bucket,put a rod through a can or something round so spins
Put it on top the 5 gal. Bucket with peanut butter on the can,put water or anti freeze in the bottom on bucket
They will go for the peanut butter on the can and spin in into bucket and they will be history
This is interesting.
 

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Get a 5 gal. bucket,put a rod through a can or something round so spins
Put it on top the 5 gal. Bucket with peanut butter on the can,put water or anti freeze in the bottom on bucket
They will go for the peanut butter on the can and spin in into bucket and they will be history
Good way to kill mice... I doubt it would have much effect for wind buffeting. ;) LOL!
 
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