GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts
W

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For you 1800 wrenches, if you had to pick a number from 1 to 10 (1 being easiest) how would be rate the GL1800 for all around maintenace
from oil and flter changes to replacing the air cleaner and valve adjustments compared to other rides you own in the past.

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
MIke, I'd give it a seven. It's a big, complex machine, and by its nature is somewhat difficult to service. The elimination of hydraulic valve adjusters as the 1500 had raises the score, as does the amount of disassembly required to change the air filter. The trade off is better performance. Oil and oil filter changes are very easy, as are the final drive and coolant changes. Brakes are very, very easy, and the rear wheel is three times easier to remove than the 1500's were. Bulb changes are a little more difficult, but the lighting system is much more effective. The electrical and audio systems are very complex. Fuel injection is much less troublesome than carburators, but harder for an owner to troubleshoot. Honda doesn't think the forks need service, but if you choose to change fluid it is more difficult than on smaller, simpler machines. Overall the 1800 presents about the same level of difficulty as the 1500. Both are twice as difficult to service as the HD Sprint, CB550F, GL650 Silver Wing, Pacific Coast, and GL1500SE I've owned in the past.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,099 Posts
I think that last post was right on the mark. Some things are worse than the 1500 (air filter, valve adjustment), but most are better (rear wheel, no timing belt, brakes, fuel injection). But if you want easy, get a simple bike.
 
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Another view . . .

I'll vote for a solid 3.

My rating incorporates 2 aspects: difficulty, and frequency.

On the difficulty level, it ranges from easy (oil / filter; rear drive lube), to somewhat complex (removing top shelter for air cleaner: and what is required for valves "when they need" to actually have shims replaced.) Fortunately, removing the top shelter, while a bit time consuming and mysterious the first time you do it, is actually quite easy. So, things done "under there" like air filter replacement, and adding accessories, are not that difficult AND not that frequent.

The valve adjustment is probably the most difficult thing required, but holy cow, the first "check" is at 32K miles, and the vast majority of the checks reported here indicate that no shim change / adjustment was needed and that the valves were in spec at 32K! So, realistically you're looking at probably 64K for the first check that might require real adjustment. Shim under bucket requires some real mechanical aptitude to get to them, but if a person is at all a wrench, and careful, it isn't that big a deal.

So, since the frequent things are really easy, and the more difficult things VERY infrequent, I'd rate the 1800 a 3 in terms of overall difficulty.

OTOH, as another example of my logic, I own a BMW R1150RT. The valve adjustment is stem and lock nut and very easy, but it is every 6k miles, so it is much more of a PITA than my 1800. Brake fluid bleeds on the RT's servo brakes are a major project requiring serious disassembly of the bike, and the stinking fuel filter is inside the gas tank. The RT is probably a 7 or 8 IMO, because of the frequency and difficulty of some of the stuff that needs to be done. The RT is also very much more sensitive to "state of tune" than the 1800, so actually keeping up w/ routine maintenance "seems" more important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,936 Posts
2 or 3 with the help of the maintenance (oops ... entertainment) vidoes from Fred H, and the service manual.

8 or 9 without Fred's vidoes.

Once you seen it done, it's pretty much just follow along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
I think I find it more intimidating that difficult. The concern of the aluminum frame with steel hardware is always there for corrosion.
Bob D.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
I cut my teeth as a do it myselfer on my Concours and the intimidation factor was immense. But after getting into the engine for my first valve adjust, then progressing to tire changes, I found it very easy. Another motivating factor was getting my bike back from a mechanic w/the fairing all screwed up. I like the Wing's long service intervals, as well as the exposed engine covers. Other than tires and oil, it may be a while before I can even comment on this thread,,,which is a good thing in and of itself.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top