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Discussion Starter #1
There are a couple of pictures and a sketch (with dimensions) of the Honda Steering Tool that I had previously posted.
Take a look if you still need some details.
http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?t=187307
The measurements that CJS so kindly provided have given me the confidence to post the tool I made many years ago that worked on the steering stem nut of my '81 GL1100. I found out later that it also worked on my '01 ST1100. I always wondered if it would work on my '05 GL1800 (see signature), but was too lazy to check. Well, the measurements CJS provided have convinced me that the tool I made most likely would work on the GL1800. Thus energized, I checked the FSM's of both my '01 ST1100 and my '05 GL1800. Yep, same tool!

My tool is ugly, but it costs next to nothing to make. It works well (I've used it several times in the past). The ghetto approach reflects the fact that I've never had a really good paying job in my entire life.

Someone posted earlier that 1 1/2" pipe would be good stock to make a steering stem wrench from. That is what mine is based on, an 11" long section of 1 1/2" galvanized water pipe. There was a reason I made it this long (to use on my '81 GL1100), but it escapes me now. Anyway, here we go:

Here is the section of pipe. It is 1 1/2" galvanized water pipe:





Here is the business end of the tool. I made four notches with a hacksaw and did the finishing work with a Dremel cut-off wheel. I took the measurements from the steering stem nut of my old '81 GL1100. I'm amazed at how closely the peg measurements match those given by CJS (above). Look at all the rust. That's what eight-plus years in Houston will do to your tools!





Next up in Digger's panoply of cheap-skate tools is a nut-cracker. I don't know how these things are sized, but the ID of the round hole on this one measures 20mm, or just over 3/4".





Next up, I've removed the threaded chisel portion of the nut-cracker and replaced it with a stout bolt with the correct threads. I placed four thick washers between the bolt-head and the body of the nut-cracker. I can't remember why I used the washers here, but I must have had a good reason:





What is all of this all leading up to? Well, about 2 3/16" inches in from the end of the pipe (the end opposite from the notched end), I drilled a 21/64" hole clear through the pipe. (Why 21/64"? Well, I'm guessing that the 5/16" drill bit I had at the time must have been dull and that I was too lazy to go get a replacement):





Next, I scrounged up a long bolt that could go through the hole I'd just drilled. I placed the loop of the nut-cracker assy into the end of the pipe with the drilled hole and stuck the bolt through the pipe and the loop of the nut-cracker:





Here is what is going on inside the pipe:





Next, just pop the notched end of the pipe on the steering stem nut, place your torque wrench on the nut, and torque away!





Ugly? Yes. However, it is functionally as good as anything else out there.

Cost? Even nowadays, I think you'd be hard pressed to blow five bucks on this one.
 

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... The ghetto approach reflects the fact that I've never had a really good paying job in my entire life...
Very creative, but I would've thought that by the time you became an astronaut, that you would've been able to scrape together a few bucks here and there... :p
 

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Digger......

I am truely impressed !!! :congrats:
I went to your web-site and enjoyed reading all about you. I commend you for your accomplishments.

I look forward to meeting you someday out on the road and sharing a conversation.
 

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I too just read from your website. You have my respect and thanks.

Wayne
 

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I've come up with another variation of th 1 1/2 galvanized pipe steering stem tool. Instead of using the nut cracker method, I got a pipe cap and drilled a hole in the top to fit a 3/4 inch bolt. The I welded the bolt to the cap from the bottom, then screwed the cap onto a 6 inch pipe nipple then welded the cap to the nipple. I made the 'tangs' by the Dremel tool method already described as well as the dimensions given before. Works great, and still around $6 bucks

 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've come up with another variation of th 1 1/2 galvanized pipe steering stem tool. Instead of using the nut cracker method, I got a pipe cap and drilled a hole in the top to fit a 3/4 inch bolt. The I welded the bolt to the cap from the bottom, then screwed the cap onto a 6 inch pipe nipple then welded the cap to the nipple. I made the 'tangs' by the Dremel tool method already described as well as the dimensions given before. Works great, and still around $6 bucks

Nice job! A big improvement over mine!
 

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Yep That's the only 'special' tool. It gets kind of nasty getting the pressed race off of the steering head. Hammer and chisel. Not a pretty sight, but not too bad. Fred's CD's are a great help with confidence in doing the job. Also freezing the appropriate parts ar a great help with reassembly.
 

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Just did mine this weekend and made the same tool as Kickback. The only issues as mentioned is getting the bearing race off of the stem. Not that big of an issues with a screwdriver and a chisel but you need to make sure that you clean up the burrs that you will get on the surface where the race sets or it will not seat properly and you'll end up with the bearings loosening over time. It's impossible to remove it without boogering up the edges of the surface a little during the removal but a quick clean up with a file and you're good to go.

Did the race tech valves and springs at the same time. Great weekend project.

Jeff...
 

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If you've had or have a VTX1800 and bought the special tool to remove the left fork spring this looks like the same tool. I hope cause I have one in my tool box.

 

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WOW! Wonderful ingenuity folks. Thanks for sharing your ideas. The only difference I can see from one to the other tool is the appearance. Nice work. :thumbup:

Todd
 

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To expand on Digger's and kickedback's design. Why not just weld an old 1/2 drive socket in the end of the pipe. Then you can use a ratchet on it, that is what I did several years ago to make one for my 1500 and it also works on my 1800.
 

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don't have picture of mine, but I did the same thing with a deep well 1/2" drive socket (I think it's a 1 1/16") from the local pawn shop. $1 and 10 minutes with a grinder and the socket is ready for the torque wrench... No welding.
 

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The measurements that CJS so kindly provided have given me the confidence to post the tool I made many years ago that worked on the steering stem nut of my '81 GL1100. I found out later that it also worked on my '01 ST1100. I always wondered if it would work on my '05 GL1800 (see signature), but was too lazy to check. Well, the measurements CJS provided have convinced me that the tool I made most likelywould work on the GL1800. Thus energized, I checked the FSM's of both my '01 ST1100 and my '05 GL1800. Yep, same tool!

My tool is ugly, but it costs next to nothing to make. It works well (I've used it several times in the past). The ghetto approach reflects the fact that I've never had a really good paying job in my entire life.

Someone posted earlier that 1 1/2" pipe would be good stock to make a steering stem wrench from. That is what mine is based on, an 11" long section of 1 1/2" galvanized water pipe. There was a reason I made it this long (to use on my '81 GL1100), but it escapes me now. Anyway, here we go:

Here is the section of pipe. It is 1 1/2" galvanized water pipe:





Here is the business end of the tool. I made four notches with a hacksaw and did the finishing work with a Dremel cut-off wheel. I took the measurements from the steering stem nut of my old '81 GL1100. I'm amazed at how closely the peg measurements match those given by CJS (above). Look at all the rust. That's what eight-plus years in Houston will do to your tools!





Next up in Digger's panoply of cheap-skate tools is a nut-cracker. I don't know how these things are sized, but the ID of the round hole on this one measures 20mm, or just over 3/4".





Next up, I've removed the threaded chisel portion of the nut-cracker and replaced it with a stout bolt with the correct threads. I placed four thick washers between the bolt-head and the body of the nut-cracker. I can't remember why I used the washers here, but I must have had a good reason:





What is all of this all leading up to? Well, about 2 3/16" inches in from the end of the pipe (the end opposite from the notched end), I drilled a 21/64" hole clear through the pipe. Why 21/64"? I'm guessing that my 5/16" drill bit must have been dull:





Next, I scrounged up a long bolt that could go through the hole I'd just drilled. I placed the loop of the nut-cracker assy into the end of the pipe with the drilled hole and stuck the bolt through the pipe and the loop of the nut-cracker:





Here is what is going on inside the pipe:





Next, just pop the notched end of the pipe on the steering stem nut, place your torque wrench on the nut, and torque away!





Ugly? Yes. However, it is functionally as good as anything else out there.

Cost? Even nowadays, I think you'd be hard pressed to blow five bucks on this one.
I have an '08 wing and the steering has a squeak turning from lock to lock, IS this bearing noise or is this seals making the noise......how hard is these bearings to change, and is this covered by warrenty
 

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don't have picture of mine, but I did the same thing with a deep well 1/2" drive socket (I think it's a 1 1/16") from the local pawn shop. $1 and 10 minutes with a grinder and the socket is ready for the torque wrench... No welding.
Seems like 1 1/16" would be way to small. Should be over 1 1/2"??
 

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Discussion Starter #17
To expand on Digger's and kickedback's design. Why not just weld an old 1/2 drive socket in the end of the pipe. Then you can use a ratchet on it, that is what I did several years ago to make one for my 1500 and it also works on my 1800.
Cal,

That's a good idea!

I would like to mention, however, that one can use a ratchet on each of the tools made by Kickedback and myself. The ratchet just needs a socket slapped onto it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18

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Discussion Starter #19
Here's my version of the tool. The plumbing supply didn't have the end cap for the 1.5" water pipe so I had to improvise. It took a bit more time but turned out rather nice. I used some 1/8" steel I had in my shop and welded it on the top from the inside. I did not try to make the top piece accurate just to save some time. I just ground down the extra steel so it was flush with the edge of the 1.5" pipe and then drilled a hole in the center of the top and welded a very short 9/16 bolt head from the inside. It's messy welding inside of something that small but if your careful it can be done.

I have a small mini mill that I used to cut the notches out, which makes it rather easy to do. I can do a lot with that mini mill. I used the dimensions in the thread to cut the notches. Thanks for the drawing BTW.


Very nice, Dave!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
don't have picture of mine, but I did the same thing with a deep well 1/2" drive socket (I think it's a 1 1/16") from the local pawn shop. $1 and 10 minutes with a grinder and the socket is ready for the torque wrench... No welding.
Elegant!
 
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