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For some inexplicable reason, I have a strong desire to make motorcycle camping my next big thing. Although I've camped occasionally over the years it has not been that enjoyable (comfortable) and I blame my obsolete equipment....tent, sleeping pad and sleeping bag. So, help me out please with the latest and greatest equipment recommendations that work especially well with a motorcycle. Camper trailers don't interest me because I just got a new cargo trailer.
 

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Depends on what's uncomfortable about it. Cold? back hurts? Cramped? noisy tent? setting up tent?

Most people are uncomfortable because of sleeping on the ground. They make some really nice pads these days, but they're not going to roll up very small. They are still very light though, so you could easily put one on your luggage rack or back seat(if solo). If you really want to sleep better(and ride solo), you could get a cot that folds up small and strap that on the back seat.

They also make tents that set up much much easier than the older ones.

I see motorcycle camping much like backpacking in terms of gear requirements. space and weight are at a premium. look around on the backpacking sites and go with what works for you because it's a bit of a personal thing too. REI is a great place to test them out in person, but you can get the same stuff much cheaper just about anywhere.

Enjoy your new endeavor!!
 

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I want to do a camping trip at a CMA Rally next month and haven't been camping for at least 40 years, so I have the same questions and concerns as I need to get camping equipment and have been looking at stuff. We will pull a trailor so space will not be the main issue.

I am looking for a tent I can stand up in, easy to put up and take down, big but not bulky.

Planning to visit Bass Pro Friday.

There is a sub-board that discusses camping.
 

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Check out Cabelas. They have a great selection of just about everything for camping. You have a cargo trailer, so don't spare on the tent. Get one big enough to stand up in--a 6 man tent is good, and you should be able to get away for under $200.00. While you're at it, since you have that trailer, invest in a nice, compact folding cot, then a Thermarest (or other similar make) self-inflating mattress. You don't have to spend a fortune on a sleeping bag, but don't scrimp, either. One that's labelled for temperatures down to 10 or 15 degrees Fahrenheit will suffice. Also, get an LED tent lantern. And if you still have room in the trailer, a small folding chair is nice to have along for sitting at a campfire.

The nice thing about having the trailer is you don't have to go very compact since you don't have to tie anything to the bike itself. And most stuff is now made pretty light, so it won't weigh a ton, either. Oh yeah, almost forgot--for your tent, make sure you buy what's called a footprint. Used to be called a ground cloth. It keeps the underside of the tent floor clean and prevents moisture from coming through. They're not expensive and most tents have one made just for that particular make and model. Otherwise, you could just cut a piece of visqueen tarp to size, but the tent tends to slide off of it.
 

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Motorcycle Consumer News has had a "Camping 101" series in the past two issues - covering tents in July and sleeping bags/pads in August.

I haven't camped in at least 20 years, but the modern equipment makes it sound a lot easier and more fun. Might be fun to give it another try.
 

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HAMMOCK camping rules! go to www.hammockforums.com . all the information you will ever need. i'm going on two years of hammocks now and not the first bad night sleep. packs up really small.
 

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Ditto on the Hammock thing that's the way to go as far as comfort is concerned IMHO:thumbup:
 

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Adding to the equipment list, get yourself a http://www.kermitchair.com/Kermit chair. These are about the most compact chair you can get.

We had a BMW/Ducati meeting at our local REI last month. It was basically a mini camping seminar. The new equipment is pretty amazing, small and compact, yet still comfortable.

I camped down in the FL panhandle, last year. It was hot and muggy, 85+, I bought myself a small Coleman portable fan. It ran on D batteries, all night long for the two nights I was camping. Made a huge difference being able to flow some air through the tent.
 

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Adding to the equipment list, get yourself a http://www.kermitchair.com/Kermit chair. These are about the most compact chair you can get.

We had a BMW/Ducati meeting at our local REI last month. It was basically a mini camping seminar. The new equipment is pretty amazing, small and compact, yet still comfortable.

I camped down in the FL panhandle, last year. It was hot and muggy, 85+, I bought myself a small Coleman portable fan. It ran on D batteries, all night long for the two nights I was camping. Made a huge difference being able to flow some air through the tent.

I like it - but
This old fat guy would need the leg extensions to raise the chair up which would bring the cost of a chair to around 170 before shipping. 350 lb weight limit tells me it is sturdy. I can get a foldable 300 lb chair at Target for $50.00, much bigger to pack, but we pull a trailer.

(I not need a 300 lb chair, I think a higher weight limit would be a sturdy chair)
 

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I've tent camped for years and use my current equipment on my bike but I usually upgrade every 2-3 years to get the latest and greatest stuff that's light, packs small and fits the bike.

Pad: Big Agnes, inflatable Air Core pad. It is not self inflating but packs into a small 6 x 12 bag and is THE most comfortable pad I have ever slept on, WAY more comfortable than a self inflating foam core pad such as the Therm a rest. I've slept on this pad in 40 degree weather with my bag pulled up like a blanket rather than inside the bag. Link: http://www.bigagnes.com/Products/Detail/Pad/InsulatedAirCore

Tent: I have a two man Kelty Gunnison 2.1. It has a rain fly that opens on both sides of the tent, so easy in and out for both occupants, I have sat for days in the rain and never had a drop inside, get the integrated ground cloth, tent packs into a small compression bag ( buy separate) poles and pegs strap under my trunk rack. Link:http://www.kelty.com/p-352-gunnison-21.aspx?category=tents-shelters

Bag: I have an EMS bag, down. Packs into a small stuff sack that is just slight bigger than the Agnes Pad. Any down bag will pack small but go to a store and try it first, EMS is a good place to start......DON'T buy one off the internet without trying it trying it out first.

Stove: Dual Fuel stove from Coleman, packs small and can use gas and White gas. Link http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=3000000792&categoryid=2020&brand=

Chair: Crazy Creek or something similar, lays flat on the bottom of the trunk. Link http://www.crazycreek.com/products-page/adventure-line-chairs/the-original-chair/

Hope that helps.
 

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I started tent camping again for the first time since I was in the Boy Scouts using crappy, second-hand Army Surplus canvas tents from the Revolutionary War. Technology has come a long way since then :thumbup: I gotta say, having the right quality gear is everything...

Since I moto-camp without pulling a trailer, space is important, but I also want as much comfort as I can get. After doing a lot of research, I found the best tent for me was the Marmot Limelight 3...small pack size, heavy material, full rainfly with 2 GIANT vestibules, and came with the footprint and gear loft. A nice 3 person tent that stows in a saddlebag with plenty of room to spare, and is a great value too.

http://marmot.com/products/limelight_3p

For my sleeping bag, I ended up with the EMS Switchback. It's a dual temp bag (25*/45*) that packs pretty small and had a lot of features I was looking for, without a giant price tag:

http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=4430050

For a pad, I use an inflatable full size air mattress. In the tent, there is still about 1.5 feet of floor space available when the mattress is pushed all the way to the side, which means plenty of room for riding gear, jacket, helmet, fan, clothes, etc., plus the two vestibules for the cooler, shoes/boots, etc. A 3 man is the way to go when camping solo. I keep my clean clothes in a dry sack on the back seat, along with a mesh bag that the dirty clothes go into. Top it off with a soft cooler and I'm ready to roll :cool:

I don't cook on-site, but I do bring a micro-stove (Optimus Crux Lite, smaller than a hockey puck) and percolator pot for morning coffee. If I really tried, I could gear up a kitchen. My biggest problem is the food side, not so much the gear. Not a big fan of MRE's, although I've heard they have come a long way too.

http://www.optimusstoves.com/en/optimus-products/products/katadynshopconnect/optimus-outdoor-kocher/optimus-crux-lite/
 

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camping

Gizmo,

You indicated trailer, so I'm going to say get a big tent and and an inflatable bed from Wally world or a cot with a pad (like the big Agnes). Get 2-burners for cooking. It can be 2 single burner stoves, but if you're going to cook, almost everyone ends up with 2 burners. Get a good tarp to cover your cooking/eating area and a comfortable chair. A pillow is a must and a quality sleeping bag suited for the weather that you'll be using it in. The Motocampers site is a good one and lots of people that do camp and like to help.

Richard
 

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Greetings!

One word of caution about tents: The cheap tents from the big discount stores are acceptable for occasional use in fair weather, but they simply aren't as well designed or as rugged as the better tents, because the manufactures plan on the tent being used maybe twice a year and only in mild weather. The more frequently they get used the faster they will wear out. They have poor ventilation and use cheap materials which make the tent miserable in very cold weather. And most of them are only good for the occasional rain shower.

If you plan on camping frequently (say 6 to 12 times a year), camping in late fall / winter / early spring, and/or want a tent that will hold up no matter how severe the weather, don't go cheap. Buy the best tent you can afford. The best brands are Hilleberg, Exped, and Nemo, with MSR, The North Face, and Marmot oulling up a close second.

The same advice goes for your sleeping gear and your kitchen gear. If you plan on using them frequently you will rapidly begin to appreciate having good equipment.
 

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I found out since I started motorcycle riding again that I also like camping. I started out tent camping. It was a little bit of a hastle to get all the equipment on my bike and wanted to get a trailer to carry my camping gear. Eventually, I saw a pop up trailer at the Wing Ding and finally bought one this year. It has a huge storage area and serves the dual purpose of providing camping and trailering functions.

As I get older, I find I really love camping a lot more now and love being outdoors. As indicated already, there are a lot of good ideas and web-sites to help you. You just have to decide on what works best for you.

Good luck.

:tongue:
 

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camping

I forgot. Earplugs, if you don't already have them for riding. Nothing will ruin your camping trip more than a lack of sleep.

Richard
 

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LL Bean

Mountain light tent $223
Footprint (UNDER tent to minimize stone punctures) $23.99
Goose Down 20 Deg. LONG sleeping bag $167
Thermarest Trail pro foam/air inflatable sleeping pad $99.95

$514/13 lb. into a large "gym" bag, or separately attached to bike.

If you sleep two up, add another $100 sleeping pad (25 in. wide) and open the single sleeping bag as a blanket over both people.
Comfortable, FIRMLY inflated cushioned pads, warm bag (temps into 30's/40's), DRY tent. Good to go basic comfort.
 

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The wife and I gave up tent camping after the last time we camped in 2004. It was a disaster as far as sleeping goes. We both have physical problems that require a fairly firm bed. It also must be high enough that we can sit down to get in bed, and get out of bed without crawling out on the floor of the tent to get up. We have tried a couple of different full or queen size beds with a fold up frame and inflatable mattress. These were both comfortable enough, but we had problems with them leaking and going flat during the night. We were un-able to patch them because of the flocked surface.

we moved up to a 5th wheel trailer and that was great, but the up-keep on it was way too expensive for the few times we were able to use it. We finally sold the trailer.

We would love to get back into camping in a tent if we could just solve the sleeping problem. Any one else face this challenge and over come it?

Joe in Modesto
 
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