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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2003 gl with a 2011 Motor Trike Adventure kit. Raked front and the good bearings torqued to specs new trike front tire. Have the air wings on it also.
Just cant get comfortable with the handling after 2 summers of riding. Live in the mountains of Pa. so lots of hills and curves. Seems to have a push into corners like it wants to roll over on the front. Switchbacks very uncomfortable. I do the lock elbow sit back against backrest and everything I have been instructed to do when cornering. Have practiced the figure 8's.
Maybe my imagination but on cooler days it seems to hug the corners better but the longer you ride if the day gets hot not the same ride I started with.
2 wheel gl rider for over 40 years.

Open for suggestions.

Thanks
 

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I have a Roadsmith kit on mine and carry 24# and 23# r. Front tire has 42# in it and no issues like you describe. I found that leaning slightly into a curve in my mind helps to navigate the curve. With wife on boardi don’t ride the same as her not on.
 

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Mike's question is a valid one. Too low air pressure will let the tires flex more resulting in mushy control. More important than that is managing weight distribution and trike body roll.

I don't ride a Motor Trike now but did put 120,000 miles on my '06 with an Adventure conversion. I like to hammer the twisties so learned to do the two mentioned tasks.

First thing I learned was I could keep my body directly centered on the trike during a curve by firmly planting my foot on the outside Wing Guard or highway peg while hugging the side of the trike with the inside foot/leg. Leaning one's body to the inside of a curve, like so many are tempted to do, may help some but it positions the rider off center thus loosing partial steering control - NOT a good situation at all. It takes some conscious practice but becomes second nature.

Reducing the trikes body roll is a matter of mechanics. Here is where the tire pressure also comes in but changing the air ride will make the biggest difference. I use to run 27 pounds of air as a general rule but when I hit the twisties that number went up to 40. HUGE DIFFERENCE in handling performance.

Two other things come to mind that will help if you haven't already done so. Add a good set of fork braces and a set of handlebar risers. I fought the idea of a fork brace for years but a trusted friend convinced me to try time. I personally recommend one that is adjustable while mounting. The non adjustable versions do not take into consideration the slight differences between individual machines. The handlebar risers made a drastic improvement to my riding experience. I realized early on that the rake kit had cause the bar angle to drop so when steering I was pushing down a lot instead of using that energy pushing out. I like the MBL risers but there are other that work just fine I'm sure

Hope all that helps. Not feeling comfortable sure takes a lot of the joy out or riding!!
 

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Like Goldrush said. I had a 2003 Goldwing/ 2010 Motortrike Adventure kit. I ran 41psi in the front tire and in the back tires (with a max of 44psi) I ran 35psi. Being a
big guy, I ran 39-40psi in the air ride. And had the fork brace, MBL risers. Did the same as he does.
 

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When I had my 2007 converted to a 2016 California Sidecar Viper, a little over 2 years ago, I would sometimes get a really bad vibration in the 55-65 mph range. It didnt happen all the time but did happen a lot. I also would have to slow down and roll off the throttle on curves because I had the feeling it was going to roll over. I lived with it for awhile and finally had enough. On a trip back from Arkansas, I stopped in at Niehaus as they have a lot of experience with CSC trikes. My brother in law was with me on this trip and said that he could occasionally see my tires bouncing up and down and this was what was causing the vibration. Niehaus first took the rear tires, removed the balance beads I was using and rebalanced the rear tires with weights. This helped a bit but didnt cure it. They were also convinced that the front tire was part of the problem. I originally was running a IIRC a G709 when it was first converted and switched to a BT45 after getting home. I would still get the same results. Niehaus changed the BT45 over to a Michelin Pilot. That actually did help a lot but didnt completely solve it. I ended up contacting CSC after I got home and was told that changing out the rear tires would most likely solve this and they had experienced this before. They authorized $200 under the 5 year warranty towards new tires and installation. The factory tires were Ohatsu and I ended up going with a nice set of Goodyears. After putting on the new tires, the problem was gone. It rides like it's on rails and smooth as glass at all speeds. And especially on the curves, I no longer feel like I'm going too fast or I'm going to roll over.



As for tire pressure, I run 36-38 on the front all the time and 22-24 on the rears all the time whether I am in flat land or in the twisties. If I go any higher, I start to feel way to many bumps in the road and get a really rough ride.


ETA: I am also running with a fork brace and MBL risers. CSC kit maintains the Honda factory rear suspension adjustment and I run that around 12 or 13 solo and bump it up to around 18-20 if 2 up or when towing my Aspen camper trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Appreciate all the replies and suggestions.

Here is some info to answer replies.

Front Tire is a Avon AV71 Trike Tire run 38-40 psi was new 8,000 miles ago and still in great condition.
Rear tires Fuzion HRI came on trike- 24-25 psi

Wife and I approx 360 lbs combined she is on petite side
usually ride 2 up with 35 to 38 shock pressure.
coils set in middle.

I have experimented with different front and rear air pressures and shock settings with no significant changes in handling comfort. . I have been leaning toward the issue being the rear tires as suggested in a post.

Don't know that it has the Fork Brace and do not have the handlebar risers.

I had the fork brace on my 2003 GL so will investigate that option and risers.
I have been talking to car tire dealers and will probably invest in new rears.

To good riding weather is so far away before I see the results.

Tired of being the guy holding back traffic thru the twisties.

Again thanks for the support and open to any other suggestions.
 

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Funny story about "being the guy holding back traffic."

When it became obvious I had to do a trike or stop riding it was not an easy choice. For years I have led the rides for a group of guy and gals and knew they would be disappointed. I was always the guy that pushed the envelope and others struggled to stay up with. When the news spread that I had converted my '06 I got comments ranging from "Well, we won't have any more fun" to " Look on the bright side; we'll get better gas mileage now." Took me a couple months to add the handling performance items and learn how to ride the BEAST. I didn't push hard during the group rides but went out solo and slowly figured out the importance of lane positioning during cornering. Then I worked on the points I mentioned earlier. Eventually, I learned and with that came confidence and I was again pushing that envelope. Two wheel GL1800s can run away from me on straights if they want to far exceed the speed limits but in serious curves and twisties I'll leave them slowing down to keep from spilling. One day a friend I have ridden with for many years realize we were back to our old tempo. Lights came on, smiles returned, and the rest is history.
 
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When I had my 2007 converted to a 2016 California Sidecar Viper, a little over 2 years ago, I would sometimes get a really bad vibration in the 55-65 mph range. It didnt happen all the time but did happen a lot. I also would have to slow down and roll off the throttle on curves because I had the feeling it was going to roll over. I lived with it for awhile and finally had enough. On a trip back from Arkansas, I stopped in at Niehaus as they have a lot of experience with CSC trikes. My brother in law was with me on this trip and said that he could occasionally see my tires bouncing up and down and this was what was causing the vibration. Niehaus first took the rear tires, removed the balance beads I was using and rebalanced the rear tires with weights. This helped a bit but didnt cure it. They were also convinced that the front tire was part of the problem. I originally was running a IIRC a G709 when it was first converted and switched to a BT45 after getting home. I would still get the same results. Niehaus changed the BT45 over to a Michelin Pilot. That actually did help a lot but didnt completely solve it. I ended up contacting CSC after I got home and was told that changing out the rear tires would most likely solve this and they had experienced this before. They authorized $200 under the 5 year warranty towards new tires and installation. The factory tires were Ohatsu and I ended up going with a nice set of Goodyears. After putting on the new tires, the problem was gone. It rides like it's on rails and smooth as glass at all speeds. And especially on the curves, I no longer feel like I'm going too fast or I'm going to roll over.

As for tire pressure, I run 36-38 on the front all the time and 22-24 on the rears all the time whether I am in flaunt land or in the twisties. If I go any higher, I start to feel way to many bumps in the road and get a really rough ride.


ETA: I am also running with a fork brace and MBL risers. CSC kit maintains the Honda factory rear suspension adjustment and I run that around 12 or 13 solo and bump it up to around 18-20 if 2 up or when towing my Aspen camper trailer.
I converted my 05 wing to a CSC Cobra in 2014. I had a Michelin Pilot Activ reverse mounted on the front and the kit came with the Ohtsus on the rear. As soon as it was done I took it on a 1200 mile ride. It was OK, but there was something I didn't like about the ride and I suspected the rear tires. There was no specific problem, it just didn't feel right to me. I yanked the Ohtsus and put on a pair of Bridgestone extreme performance tires. Wow, what a difference. It is now smooth as glass up to 95 mph and probably beyond and has great traction.

I don't hold up traffic.

Wish I had known CSC would contribute to the tire change.

Oh, I run with 38 psi front and 25 psi rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sounds like me to a T on my 03 GL. Now if I can just get back to being that leader and also hook up the camper again. Tired of BUTT PUCKERING. I read all the stories of the trike being able to be fast in corners ( but none of my buddies believe) but I am not the example of that for sure.

Has anybody changed the fork springs?

Planning on fork brace, handlebar risers and different rear tires. Any tire suggestions ?
 

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I am using Progressive fork springs and disabled the antidive valve. However I had done that well before I converted my bike into a trike. I kept that setup with my trike. I have seen where some complained that the Progressive springs on trikes were to hard and gave a rough ride. I absolutely dont agree with that. Most likely they didnt disable the ADV valve like recommended and it froze up. I did get a bit of a rough ride when I ran the Michelin Pilot at 41lbs psi but running it at 36-38lbs I enjoy the ride.


In the original configuration with the defective Ohatsu rear tires, I too had plenty of butt puckering. The new rear tires made all the difference for me but no guarantee that is the problem you are having. It does sound though like it is a similar problem though based on your description.



And I know of at least 1 guy I have ridden with down in Arkansas that almost no one I know would be able to keep up with. And I have been around many excellent riders that spend a lot of time in the twisties. He rides a yellow 2010 that was converted to a California Sidecar Cobra trike. I can pretty much hold my own now when out riding with bikes in the curves.
 

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One more thing to add, for some reason about 10 or so years ago, (early 40's) I started getting a fear of heights. Not sure why but it started creeping up on me. This has transferred over to my riding as well. When I'm out on mountain roads, as long as its wooded on both sides, I'm fine. But in the sections where there are visible steep drop offs right on the side of the road, my fear begins to kick in. But I refuse to give into it because I would have missed out on some spectacular sights and places. I just push myself forward when I find myself in those situations. As long as I continue to look straight ahead and only pay attention to the road, I usually do just fine but I do find myself slowing down sometimes during these times.
 

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One more thing to add, for some reason about 10 or so years ago, (early 40's) I started getting a fear of heights. Not sure why but it started creeping up on me. This has transferred over to my riding as well. When I'm out on mountain roads, as long as its wooded on both sides, I'm fine. But in the sections where there are visible steep drop offs right on the side of the road, my fear begins to kick in. But I refuse to give into it because I would have missed out on some spectacular sights and places. I just push myself forward when I find myself in those situations. As long as I continue to look straight ahead and only pay attention to the road, I usually do just fine but I do find myself slowing down sometimes during these times.
Gravity is the most dangerous thing on this planet.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have always had the fear of heights getting worse with age. Have been on those steep mountain roads in WV NC Tenn Pa with no guard rails on this ill handling 3 wheeler. All for the love to ride.
Hopefully will conquer this handling issue.
 

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Appreciate all the replies and suggestions.
Here is some info to answer replies.
Front Tire is a Avon AV71 Trike Tire run 38-40 psi was new 8,000 miles ago and still in great condition.
Rear tires Fuzion HRI came on trike- 24-25 psi
Wife and I approx 360 lbs combined she is on petite side
usually ride 2 up with 35 to 38 shock pressure.
coils set in middle.
I have been leaning toward the issue being the rear tires as suggested in a post.
I have ridden MotorTrike wings since 2009 for about 300,000 miles and like you had ridden 2 wheel wings for many years prior so I will offer a few thoughts for your consideration.
*Don’t lean too heavily on what others do. Instead, consider what others do as a start to find what’s right for you. What others consider the perfect ride you might hate. Everything about their situation might be different from yours.
With that being said, several things that you said stood out to me.
*You are right on looking at the rear tires. It amazes me how much they effect overall ride. As some stated, tire brands vary enormously. A different brand may require a different pressure to achieve the same ride, handling and comfort as another brand. I lost a weight off a rear tire and there was so much vibration that my mirrors were a blur.
*The load that you carry is quite a lot higher than mine, but I run my coils all the way up and between 50 and 55 in the air bags. If you haven’t tried coils all the way up and higher air bag pressures, you might want to see what effect that has.
*Depending on the rear tires that I’m using at the time, I have run from 18 to 22 psi. With the tires that I’m currently using I run 22.
*I am currently running the Avon trike tire as well, and at 42psi. I have been to several seminars put on by Jeff Vey, MotorTrike founder, and any time a tire question is asked, he suggest 42psi. That is what they run on their test trikes.

None of these ideas may be what works for you, but I have no handling issues in the curves or anywhere else so maybe, along with the other suggestions that you have had, you will find what is right for you. Good luck.
 

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Just reread the original post and noticed something that I didn’t pick up on the first time. You stated that your kit is the 2011 Adventure kit. How many miles are on the kit? MotorTrike uses crappy bushings in their shocks that often are shot very quickly with a load a lot lighter than yours. When they are badly worn, the handling is terrible. They now have what is hopefully better bushings, but still ship their kits with the old crappy bushings in the shocks. My new 17 still had them and they were in pitiful shape at 20,000 miles and the handling was lousy. The new bushings took care of the problem. Have no idea if age could cause the same problem with deteriation of these bushings. Any chance that might be your problem?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My local Motor trike dealer replaced the bushings with the new ones. You are correct the old ones were shot. This helped but still not what I was expecting.
Any suggestions on changing fork springs and fluid over winter and possibly putting the upper extensions on tubes. Trike has 85,000 miles on it.
Trying to compile all the great suggestions and replies



Appreciate all the advise from fellow riders.
 

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My suggestions are based on things that I had to deal with since becoming a trike rider and they may or may not have anything to do with your situation. If you haven’t already tried this, I would suggest setting the coils at their stiffest setting and raise your air bag pressure to 55-60, possibly even higher. My weight and total load is considerably lower than yours and mine wouldn’t handle to suit me the way yours is set. You could go higher on the air bags and if too high, go down a little at a time. Some do set the coils in the middle like you, but mine has a tendency to bottom out and just not handle to suit me at that setting. Good handling is sort of a trade off somewhere between a comfortable and a hard ride. Each has to find their own zone that gives the kind of ride they desire, but most go through that with a 2 wheeler, as well. Sometimes it takes a lot of experimenting to find just what works in your situation because I think we all have a tendency to try to duplicate the ride of a 2 wheeler when switching to three. To me, mine rides just as good, just a little different. I’m quite happy with the way mine rides and handles but you might hate it. I hope you are able to find the ride that makes you just as happy with yours, and hope my suggestions help a little in finding it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Such a bummer that have to wait possibly a few months to give any suggestions a try since we live in Pa. I like and trust the fact that the suggestions are coming from knowledgeable riders. Knowing that not everything works for everybody but will be trying to figure out what works for me.

Thanks
 
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