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I know that there has been quite a bit of discussion here on the use of motorcycle lifts used on the Gold Wing and there have been many called out by name but I am just ignorant as to what they are. What I have here is a Kobalt 1500 lb. lift that I bought at Lowes and was wondering if anyone uses this type of lift on their Wing. I used this lift on my Harleys but the Harley's engine was inside the frame and did not rest on the lift arms like the Wing will. I'm afraid to use this with lift arms contacting the engine case. Comments????

 

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While I don't have that exact model, I do have one very similar. It will work just fine on your wing.

Just position the rearward arm directly under the centerstand pivot point. The front lifting arm will be under the engine, and will not hurt anything. Thats how everyone that I know of positions their lifts.
 

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It looks to me like it would work fine.

You might have to put a shim under the exhaust pipe to stabilize it.

I think the pit bull has the biggest footprint and stability.
 

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Interesting post... I just used my new Pitbull lift for the first time today and spent a bit of time figuring out where to place it under the bike. I too used the center stand as the back contact point and the engine case as the front.

Initially I wondered whether a Pitbull was worth the extra cost... that was until I lifted my bike two feet into the air. I now think the Pitbull was a great investment!!! :yes1::yes1::yes1::yes1::yes1::yes1:
 

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I been having trouble too finding a lift point..... But this works fine....... ;)
 

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I been having trouble too finding a lift point..... But this works fine....... ;)
Holly crap Batman!!! :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

Good thing the side extensions were on the table or that incident could have been much worse.
 

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I know that there has been quite a bit of discussion here on the use of motorcycle lifts used on the Gold Wing and there have been many called out by name but I am just ignorant as to what they are. What I have here is a Kobalt 1500 lb. lift that I bought at Lowes and was wondering if anyone uses this type of lift on their Wing. I used this lift on my Harleys but the Harley's engine was inside the frame and did not rest on the lift arms like the Wing will. I'm afraid to use this with lift arms contacting the engine case. Comments????

Looks just like the one I got from COSTCO and it works great for the Wing.
 

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Interesting post... I just used my new Pitbull lift for the first time today and spent a bit of time figuring out where to place it under the bike. I too used the center stand as the back contact point and the engine case as the front.

Initially I wondered whether a Pitbull was worth the extra cost... that was until I lifted my bike two feet into the air. I now think the Pitbull was a great investment!!! :yes1::yes1::yes1::yes1::yes1::yes1:
Hey Keghead...If you don't mind measuring, can you tell me how wide the PitBull is from center of one lift arm to center of the other. The Kobalt that I have pictured is 12.5" center to center. Thanks
 

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Interesting post... I just used my new Pitbull lift for the first time today and spent a bit of time figuring out where to place it under the bike. I too used the center stand as the back contact point and the engine case as the front.

Initially I wondered whether a Pitbull was worth the extra cost... that was until I lifted my bike two feet into the air. I now think the Pitbull was a great investment!!! :yes1::yes1::yes1::yes1::yes1::yes1:

I purchased a pitbull lift at a cycle show earlier this month. They demonstrated it. The back rail should rest on the center stand pivot point. The front rail will be on the engine. Pitbull provides a shim for use with GWs to eliminate any wiggle. Detailed lift instructions for the GW are included with the shim. You have to ask for the shim. It does not automatically come with the lift. I have not used my lift yet. I think one problem with some of the less expensive lifts is they don't lower the bike as easily as they raise the bike. I returned my Harbor Freight lift for that reason.
 
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I purchased a pitbull lift at a cycle show earlier this month. They demonstrated it. The back rail should rest on the center stand pivot point. The front rail will be on the engine. Pitbull provides a shim for use with GWs to eliminate any wiggle. Detailed lift instructions for the GW are included with the shim. You have to ask for the shim. It does not automatically come with the lift. I have not used my lift yet. I think one problem with some of the less expensive lifts is they don't lower the bike as easily as they raise the bike. I returned my Harbor Freight lift for that reason.
Sage: Obviously, you never owned one of the higher quality Sears jacks.

I bought a $60 SEARS lift and have had no problems at all lifting or lowering my Goldwing and it does so with just a 1 ton capacity bottle jack (unlike the PitBull which supposedly needs a much higher rating, like 12 tons, to lift and smoothly lower the same weight). While the Sears lift may not have a wide stance or be as stable as a PitBull, I don't plan on sitting on the bike pretending to ride it while it is on the lift. :rolleyes: With the use of the included tie down straps I'm not the least bit concerned in using it and it does exactly what I paid for it to do and for 8 times less money than a PitBull.

While it has always been quite true that you get what you pay for, I figured that for the few hours and few times per year that my Goldwing will be perched upon the Sears lift, it has already paid for itself in it's first few uses, while the cost of the PitBull would take many years and may never fully pay for itself. If I serviced many bikes per week then it would be a different story and I would have a different priority (to safely make money, instead of spending it).

If your pockets are extra deep, then by all means buy the PitBull lift. Personally, I feel it makes much better sense to use a little logic and a few safety precautions, buy a reasonably priced quality lift (like the Sears), and keep the $500 in your pocket. YMMV...
 

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Humm, interesting posting. I was just thinking, I have a stand for my VTX that slides under the bike after the bike is jacked up. My sears jack fits inside of it when it's in place. When I use it , I jack the bike up, slide the stand under the bike and set the bike down onto the stand. This get's the jack out of the way and the bike is steady. I just wonder if this would work on a wing. This is what the stand looks like.




I guess one day I'll have to try it.
 

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Sage: Obviously, you never owned one of the higher quality Sears jacks.

I bought a $60 SEARS lift and have had no problems at all lifting or lowering my Goldwing and it does so with just a 1 ton capacity bottle jack (unlike the PitBull which supposedly needs a much higher rating, like 12 tons, to lift and smoothly lower the same weight). While the Sears lift may not have a wide stance or be as stable as a PitBull, I don't plan on sitting on the bike pretending to ride it while it is on the lift. :rolleyes: With the use of the included tie down straps I'm not the least bit concerned in using it and it does exactly what I paid for it to do and for 8 times less money than a PitBull.

While it has always been quite true that you get what you pay for, I figured that for the few hours and few times per year that my Goldwing will be perched upon the Sears lift, it has already paid for itself in it's first few uses, while the cost of the PitBull would take many years and may never fully pay for itself. If I serviced many bikes per week then it would be a different story and I would have a different priority (to safely make money, instead of spending it).

If your pockets are extra deep, then by all means buy the PitBull lift. Personally, I feel it makes much better sense to use a little logic and a few safety precautions, buy a reasonably priced quality lift (like the Sears), and keep the $500 in your pocket. YMMV...
I've read several posts from people who have been pleased with the Sears lift. No question about it - the pitbull's price forces you to think long and hard before buying it. At first I picked up the Harbor Freight cheap, but returned it. The pitbull instills a lot more confidence than my Harbor Freight. The pitpull uses a 12 ton jack for its air lift and 6 ton for manual lift. One thing I like about pitbull is you can store the bike on the lift for extended periods (like winter storage). My Harbor Freight jack recommended against long term storage. Perhaps the extra capacity helps here.
 
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I've read several posts from people who have been pleased with the Sears lift. No question about it - the pitbull's price forces you to think long and hard before buying it. At first I picked up the Harbor Freight cheap, but returned it. The pitbull instills a lot more confidence than my Harbor Freight. The pitpull uses a 12 ton jack for its air lift and 6 ton for manual lift. One thing I like about pitbull is you can store the bike on the lift for extended periods (like winter storage). My Harbor Freight jack recommended against long term storage. Perhaps the extra capacity helps here.
Sage: I never understood why a 12 ton bottle jack (or 6 ton) is needed to lift a 900 lb motorcycle, and I still don't? One can only assume that their jack was engineered with something wrong in it's design or function. The $60 Sears lift can be raised and lowered very, very smoothly with only a 1 ton bottle jack. ??? Just don't know!

Someday, when I have the time and energy, I want to cut the Sears lift apart and make the lift arms a bit longer and widen the stance, ad some brass bushings and spacers at the high tension lift points along with zerk grease fittings, higher grade bolts, and then re-weld it all back together. Yea, it will probably never happen. It works fine just like it is. For $60, I was amazed how heavy the Sears lift was and am really amazed that (even in China) they can make a heavy metal lift and ship it to America and still sell it for a reasonable profit! The PitBull cost more to ship (300 miles) than what I paid in total for the Sears lift AND the cost of shipping it from China? Hard to believe, but true. PitBull wants to make money on the shipping end too!

Milbear: I'd say that it is an excellent idea and it would be very stable but you would have to probably glue some soft or sticky rubber strips (or soft wood) along the metal framework where the bike would rest as metal to metal contact here would make it easy to slide off or unexpectedly move when you least want it to. It wouldn't hurt to ad some safety straps and connect attachment points on the frame to make it extra safe for unattended use (like sitting on the stand when the phone rings or dinner is ready).
 

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I have been using a Pit Bull for about 10 years with no problems of any kind. Last summer I added the turn table which allows you to rotate the bike full circle no matter how high you may have lifted it. It makes it much easier to work on without the base and lifting arms in the way.. I wouldn't try to rotate a bike 90 degrees on any stand with a smaller footprint than the Pit Bull.
 

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Sounds like the lift that I have will be okay.:thumbup: It will be used primarily to lift the bike for tire changes, etc. I would also like to extend the footprint of the lift at the castors and at the lift arms like BigDaddy suggested. I know I will never FIND time to make that happen so I will just have to MAKE time some day. And....I have another question....Why would anyone want to set their wing up on a lift such as these for long term storage when all you need to do it pop it up onto the center stand:?:
 
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...more money in my pocket!

I have been using a Pit Bull for about 10 years with no problems of any kind. Last summer I added the turn table which allows you to rotate the bike full circle no matter how high you may have lifted it. It makes it much easier to work on without the base and lifting arms in the way.. I wouldn't try to rotate a bike 90 degrees on any stand with a smaller footprint than the Pit Bull.
I like the idea of the turn table, so I spent $40 more and bought a padded seat with wheels to move around the bike while it's on the lift. :thumbup:
 
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