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I have found a really nice GL1800 that was damaged due to hitting a deer. The insurance company has given the bike a junk title.

Can anything be done to the junk title so that the bike can be licensed again?

Thanks
 

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It varies from stste to state. I rebuilt a bike in Idaho - they issue a new title upon completion of a rebuild. Check with your state DMV to see what they do with a rebuild. If nothing else, bring it to Idaho to register it! :)
 

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In Ohio it's called a "salvage" title. Usually this indicates there has been substanial damage and/or the frame has been compromised. Such a bike can be rebuilt and restored to resemble a like new bike, but the salvage title stays with it. This lets any future owners know that this bike has been damaged to the point that it was not feasable to repair it. Value is about half of what it is worth, and there are uaually problems associated with this bike down the road. My advise is STAY AWAY from a salvage title or any bike that has been wrecked and rebuilt.
 

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A friend of mine has 'rebuilt' a car or two here in IL. that had been totalled. After he got the car done, it had to be inspected by someone from the state. I never asked him if it said REBUILT on the title or not.

Way back in the 80's, I bought a car that had a salvage title from OK. I sent the salvage title to a company in Alabama, that 'bought' my car for a price, retitled it in their name, then sold it back to me for the same price plus a fee. I took their paperwork to the secretary of states' office and applied for a new title in IL. But, I'm sure that things have changed since then?
 

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I did that 1 time,brought a wreck m/c from junt yard . I went to motor vehile dept and ask them what steps are required to ride again. they told me to keep all receipts of parts and time of labor if possible.

when you have all the work completed,take tomvd and they will give you a new vin for repaired vehicles/motorcycles.

make sure that you check with them before statring project.I had a check list to follow by
.
people do that everyday rebuilding wreck vehicles.cut vehicles in half from junk yards to make a new body
ride safe
edmund
03 1800abs
 

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Like the man said, it depends on the state. In Texas, when a bike is totaled, it is given a "salvage" title. If the bike is brought back to condition before it was totaled, you can submit proof of the work and parts fixed and they will give you a "rebuilt" title. That indicates exactly what it says, the bike has been rebuilt to state specifications and may now be titled, licensed and ridden as any other bike.

Mesquite Bob
 

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Bash said:
In Ohio it's called a "salvage" title. Usually this indicates there has been substanial damage and/or the frame has been compromised. Such a bike can be rebuilt and restored to resemble a like new bike, but the salvage title stays with it. This lets any future owners know that this bike has been damaged to the point that it was not feasable to repair it. Value is about half of what it is worth, and there are uaually problems associated with this bike down the road. My advise is STAY AWAY from a salvage title or any bike that has been wrecked and rebuilt.
My brother just bought a HD Ultra with a "salvage" title. We both knew the fellow that did the rebuild and (obviously) trusted his work, as he has quite a good reputation. As much as anything, I think that is the important piece in the puzzle, as the bike is simply a sum of it's parts and if they're all in good working order, there should be no problems down the road. Still, Bash is right - if you know nothing about the rebuilder, I'd be very skeptical.
 

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Titling is not the problem. Selling it later is the problem.

The thing with bikes is that the plastic on some of them (most of them, actually) is so expensive OEM that a bike can be totalled that might not have any serious mechanical damage. The problem is that unless someone had the adjustors damage report and pictures they would never know. And then if the bike has been already repaired you wouldn't know either.

The comment about knowing the rebuilder is right on, but even then you might have problems selling later. Resale seems to be the biggest problem because most buyers are going to be spooked by the title. If you search Google for salvage title you will see the warnings your future buyer would see. If it is a great deal and you plan to keep it till it wears out it could be a bargain.
 

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Bash said:
In Ohio it's called a "salvage" title. Usually this indicates there has been substanial damage and/or the frame has been compromised. Such a bike can be rebuilt and restored to resemble a like new bike, but the salvage title stays with it. This lets any future owners know that this bike has been damaged to the point that it was not feasable to repair it. Value is about half of what it is worth, and there are uaually problems associated with this bike down the road. My advise is STAY AWAY from a salvage title or any bike that has been wrecked and rebuilt.
In Ohio, you can apply to restore the title to a "normal title" you have to have it inspected by the Highway Patrol. The Highway Patrol charges 25 bucks to inspect the vehicle.
 

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To underline how this can vary from state to state, here's a story from my past. I had bought a car from a dealer in Michigan which had a Michigan 'Salvage' branded title. It had been stolen and recovered with the steering column damaged, the radio gone and the trunk lock punched. The dealer from whom I bought it had repaired all of those things. I had an inspection done here in Indiana and got a clean (unbranded) Indiana title, having met all of the legal requirements at the time.

I then took the car to an auction in Indianapolis where it was sold to a dealer from South Bend, IN who took it to his dealership where it sold to a customer from five miles north in Niles, MI. When that individual took the title to his local Secretary of State's office he received a new Michigan title with the 'Salvage' brand back on it. Michigan did not recognize the fact that the car had been inspected in Indiana and given a clean title.

The interesting part of this is that the title to this car was only given a 'Salvage' brand because the car had not been recovered until after the insurance company had settled the claim so the insurance company became the owner of the recovered vehicle. Even if this car had been recovered in pristine condition with a fresh coat of wax the title to it would have been given the 'Salvage' brand.

On the flip side, a car that caught fire, went over a cliff and was washed down a raging river could avoid a 'Salvage' title if the owner agreed to settle with the insurance company and keep the car by taking a settlement amount of the value of the car less whatever the insurance company deemed the scrap value of the car. That car could then be rebuilt and sold with a clean title. Great system, isn't it?
 
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