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Discussion Starter #1
There is a law signed recently that could have a large effect on the motorcycling industry, and our freedom of choice.

Here is part of it.

Morgantown, WV (2/12/2009) - On February 10th, a law went into effect prohibiting the sale of minicycles to children under the age of 13 as a result of the lead content in the machines (Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, Title I, Section 101). This law, which arguably applies to both motorcycles and ATVs, treats any children's product that contains more lead than the limit established by law as a banned hazardous substance.

We have already begun to experience the devastating consequences of this new legislation upon our sport, as OEMs have already pulled these machines from their showroom floors. Youth racing is the foundation of our sport. That is when most of you fell in love with motorcycles in the first place, only to grow up to bring your own kids back to the racetracks. Only now, they can't ride.

The full report can be found here.
http://www.atvriders.com/atvnews/racerproductions2009-atv-motorcycle-lead-ban-cpsc-petition-letter.html

Thought it may open some peoples eyes to things that they may not be aware of.


Hang in there BEV, you can do it !!

Harry.
 

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try not to let your kids lick the mud off the bike, that way they won't get lead poisoning :roll:

Our government has turned into complete morons:shrug:
 

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On February 10th, a law went into effect prohibiting the sale of minicycles to children under the age of 13 as a result of the lead content in the machines
Ok... color me confused, but... just how many THIRTEEN year olds are out there buying minibikes in the first place? :roll:

I mean, ok, I started working with my dad on weekends & before/after school when I was 9... but even then, I never had enough money to go out on my own and buy a minibike.

As such, I really have no problem with this law, in and of itself. Notice, it doesn't say that dear ole Dad (or Mom) can't go out ant buy one for 13 yr old Billy.

:popcorn:
 

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You have to also remember that our great Federal Government is also banning younger children from riding with their parents on most Federal lands. I take that to mean the lands are not "public", they are owned by a group of strangers from Washington DC. "We the people" doesn't mean you and I. Just a thought.
 

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Ok... color me confused, but... just how many THIRTEEN year olds are out there buying minibikes in the first place? :roll:

I mean, ok, I started working with my dad on weekends & before/after school when I was 9... but even then, I never had enough money to go out on my own and buy a minibike.

As such, I really have no problem with this law, in and of itself. Notice, it doesn't say that dear ole Dad (or Mom) can't go out ant buy one for 13 yr old Billy.

:popcorn:
Actually it has already been effected as Honda told their dealers to pull all the vehicles off their showroom. So if even if dear old dad wanted to buy one he can not do so. My local dealer had all of his inventory pulled off the showroom per Honda and is awaiting direction from Honda what to do next. It appears Honda and the other manufacturers are appealing the law. We will wait and see. The dealer is also a Suzuki dealer and said they are considering relabeling the units with new labels "for over the age of 14". Time will tell. This the same thing the Gov did with the 3 wheelers back a few years.
 

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This act is not about motorcycles being restricted by government as the article and the title of this post suggests. It is about lead content of toys and other products that children 12 and under may be exposed too.

If you read the act, it is not that specific about any one product. It is about lead content and the move to ban lead all together.

Manufacturers will be forced to change the way they paint and/or protect stuff. Pain in the a$$ for them, good for the kids; I suppose.

Anybody here suffering from the long-term effects of lead exposure when you were a kid? Anyone know anybody?

What till someone discovers what effects aluminum alloys have on us; the feces will really hit the fan then.
 

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Ok... color me confused, but... just how many THIRTEEN year olds are out there buying minibikes in the first place? :roll:

I mean, ok, I started working with my dad on weekends & before/after school when I was 9... but even then, I never had enough money to go out on my own and buy a minibike.

As such, I really have no problem with this law, in and of itself. Notice, it doesn't say that dear ole Dad (or Mom) can't go out ant buy one for 13 yr old Billy.

:popcorn:
:agree::beer3:
 

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I often wonder how I lived to be as old as I am growing up without the Federal government protection from everything I did. I remember being out in the yard with ant poison (Cynagas) treating ant hills. It amazes me how I and my peers made it. :shrug:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
To bjcarter2.
I note your comment where you quote the title and lead in sentence in this thread. You then claim that it is not about things as listed in my post.

Allow me to explain. I brought this to interested peoples attention, because some of the bikes already removed from the sales floor do contain lead inside the clutch cable, and inside the crankcase of the motor. (They are hardly places that a child would be harmed by the lead.) But at this time, they ARE included in the ban, which is hurting the motorcycle industry.
The thread is meant for info only, and was mentioned as such. Perhaps you didn't read the whole thread.


Here is another quote on the same subject that does as I implied, ie damages or resticts the motor cycle industry in general :-

"And therein lies the problem. Effectively, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 has banned the sale of kid's motorcycles and ATVs - and it all went into effect yesterday, February 10. And the ban also includes parts, thereby affecting motorcyclists like Hawkins and the entire motorcycle industry"

I'm not trying to sell any opinion here, but made the post in a friendly gesture. I now feel that this post was not meant for you and I apologize for wasting some of your valuable time.
Thank you.

Harry.
 

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The only excuse I have for the way I am is "long term lead exposure" or no, wait maybe alcohol, other mood enhancing stuff, no, or ?
 

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At 13 I already had my first Triumph Tiger Cub, at least it was a full sized bike with lights , brakes and horn.

Ok... color me confused, but... just how many THIRTEEN year olds are out there buying minibikes in the first place? :roll:

I mean, ok, I started working with my dad on weekends & before/after school when I was 9... but even then, I never had enough money to go out on my own and buy a minibike.

As such, I really have no problem with this law, in and of itself. Notice, it doesn't say that dear ole Dad (or Mom) can't go out ant buy one for 13 yr old Billy.

:popcorn:
 

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Kids with mini bikes, racing bikes, ipods, cell phones, computer games, and the list goes on and on. Not much wonder we are a nation of materialistic consumers (Canada also) Kids have far too much money in their little hands these days.

Remember The Beatles. They didn't make it big until they were well into their twenties. Now the big stars of music are in their mid teens or even younger. Why you ask? Because our little children have so much money in the hot little hands that they support these little children stars buying buying their music. This is not negating anyone's musical talent, it just demonstrates how much money our children have compared with what we had.

I hate to see what the next generation will bring to this world. Maybe once we reach 65 they will just give us an injection to off us since we will be nothing but a burden to society after our age of usefulness passes.

If kids don't have bikes to ride it will not have any affect on their desire to own a motorcycle. I didn't have a motorcycle until I was 19 year old and it didn't hurt me. Actually it may have held me back a bit so that I didn't get hurt.

I was Canadian National Champion many times over and what did I do when we had kids? I protected them from motorcycle until they were old enough and responsible enough to make proper decisions. I taught my son to ride when he was 22 and my daughter when she was 21. It has not had any affect on their desire to ride bikes. My son owns a Kawasaki, Voyager and my daughter is going on her honeymoon this July on a motorcycle.

I digress and wander here. A sure sign that I am on the upper end of the generation gap I guess. Thanks for reading to my rant. LOL
 

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At 13 I already had my first Triumph Tiger Cub, at least it was a full sized bike with lights , brakes and horn.
Yeah... ok, fine. But did YOU buy it? Or did your Dad buy it? The law doesn't prohibit a father from buying one for his son/daughter... and that's my point.
 

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They are gone, so no one can buy one. My 8 year old grandson has one, he did not buy, but the next time he chews on the cables or the sticks his tongue in the engine he could be exposed to lead and end up like Pelosi or Reid, nuttier than a fruit cake!
 

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Yeah... ok, fine. But did YOU buy it? Or did your Dad buy it? The law doesn't prohibit a father from buying one for his son/daughter... and that's my point.
That is what I thought at first too Tom. But the article that was referenced at the start of this thread is wrong. Even a Dad can't buy one. The new law prohibits the sale of any product that is designed for children 12 and under from having more than 400 parts per million of lead.
 

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Heck I bought it and a BSA 250 soon after. I think I gave $50 for the Triumph and the BSA I got for not much more. This was back in 67 If I remember. Heck you could buy a beater car back then for $25 hehe.

Bikes have always been in the family, when I got my first one it was stashed down the block in the neighbors garage. By 14 I had moved them here.

My dad buy it? yeah right the only thing he bought me a swift kick in the ass when he caught me with the 1st bike, after than he mellowed.

FWIW most of the mini bikes being sold by these auto parts stores, Ebay and the like are not street legal ie even if you were a licensed driver you could not operate them on the streets and you could not insure them to be operated on the streets no matter what age you were and of course that were older we now know that if you do not have a valid DL no insurance in the world would cover you if you were involved in a crash..........

Times have changed

Yeah... ok, fine. But did YOU buy it? Or did your Dad buy it? The law doesn't prohibit a father from buying one for his son/daughter... and that's my point.
 

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Yeah... ok, fine. But did YOU buy it? Or did your Dad buy it? The law doesn't prohibit a father from buying one for his son/daughter... and that's my point.
The facts don't support your point. All bikes under 85cc are off the shelf. What's worse, so are all parts and supplies. If you bought a bike prior to the ban, you can no longer service it or get replacement parts. Warranty or not! You're SOL.

I would have liked the government to produce a single example of a kid getting lead poisoning from a motorcycle. This is pure government 'run amuck'.

In a controlled environment, motorcycles are a great tool for teaching kids responsibility. It is a big part of the offroad industry. You may not like or support it, but it should be the decision of the parents. A warning label or signed notification to the parent would have sufficed. I think the 'greenies' have their hand in this too.
 

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We have already begun to experience the devastating consequences of this new legislation upon our sport, as OEMs have already pulled these machines from their showroom floors. Youth racing is the foundation of our sport.
Yep, devastating consequences indeed! :roll:

Youth racing is the foundation of our sport? What sport is that? Touring on a Goldwing?

Hey here is an idea! How about the manufacturers complying with the law, just like everyone else in America has to and get the lead out? duh!
 

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The facts don't support your point. All bikes under 85cc are off the shelf. What's worse, so are all parts and supplies. If you bought a bike prior to the ban, you can no longer service it or get replacement parts. Warranty or not! You're SOL.
That's not true. Don't go by what that silly article said. As is usually the case in most blogs and amateur editorials, there wasn't much in it that was very accurate.

This was a well intentioned law that was badly needed, since manufacturers can't be trusted to do the right thing. Motorcycles were unintentionally included in this ban. From what I have read, the primary problem with motorcycles in these cases is due to the amount of lead used in a battery. Considering how small these kids bikes are, do they really need to be using lead based batteries anyway? There are a number of non lead alternatives that could do the job. This really isn't that difficult of a problem for the manufacturers to solve.

I agree that this needs to be addressed by the CPSC. But don't fight the battle here. Contact the MIC and found out what you can do to get it corrected.
 
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