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What kind of mpg difference have some you experienced at lower temps and higher temps? My trike has gotten about 30 mpg during the winter temps, but this w/e I got about 37 mpg with temps in the upper 70's. I was quite surprised.:shock:
 

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I think there is something more than temps to have a 7 mpg change.
 

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They could have switched from winter blend to summer blend already in Miss.....:shrug:
 

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What kind of mpg difference have some you experienced at lower temps and higher temps? My trike has gotten about 30 mpg during the winter temps, but this w/e I got about 37 mpg with temps in the upper 70's. I was quite surprised.:shock:

That is completely normal, when we use to run 24 hour
indurance races when I was road racing we used more
gas at night then in the heat of the day.


My wife and I ride to Florida in the winter from SC. and
if we leave at 20 degrees running between 85 and 100
mph the first tank gets low 20's mpg the second tank
high 20's to low 30's at the same speed because it is
warming up. In florida in the 70's running the same
speed we get high 30's to low 40's mpg.


What you are seeing is 100% normal. You will notice
with fuel injected motorcycles that at high altitude you
get way better gas mileage then you do at sea level.

WHY?? you might ask? is because the less air you have
the less fuel the computer will put out, the more air you
have the more fuel the computer will put out. Cold air
is better then hot air also, so you get worse mpg's at
cold temps.You also have less air at high altitude then
you have at sea level.


I hope this help explain what you are seeing at the
pump"


Ride safe and enjoy....
 

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What kind of mpg difference have some you experienced at lower temps and higher temps? My trike has gotten about 30 mpg during the winter temps, but this w/e I got about 37 mpg with temps in the upper 70's. I was quite surprised.:shock:
I see about a 12% increase in MPG from winter (0-40F) to summer (60-100) temps. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, Chuck, for the great explanation. I kind of thought it was normal, but not sure. It does make sense after your explanation. I like riding in warm weather better anyway, so bring it on! Thanks to all the other respondees, too.
 

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Thanks, Chuck, for the great explanation. I kind of thought it was normal, but not sure. It does make sense after your explanation. I like riding in warm weather better anyway, so bring it on! Thanks to all the other respondees, too.

:agree:

Phil
 

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I'm sure fuel density changes have some impact also.I'm not a chemist or scientist but my guess is fuel under cold temps is more dense. Seems i remember some drag cars had a "cool can" where they ran the fuel lines in a can formed in a coil and they placed ice in the can to cool the fuel. Denser fuel also makes more horsepower.

LAW
 

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I don't check the fuel consumption on the wing as much as I do in our cage. Below is a snapshot of our Passat TDI with the trip computer set on "average MPG per trip" This was a DRY 20% humidity morning at the end of my 22 mile commute. When the humidity goes up the fuel mileage goes down to an average of 38 to 40 MPG per trip.


Click to enlarge...........
 

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I'm sure fuel density changes have some impact also.I'm not a chemist or scientist but my guess is fuel under cold temps is more dense. Seems i remember some drag cars had a "cool can" where they ran the fuel lines in a can formed in a coil and they placed ice in the can to cool the fuel. Denser fuel also makes more horsepower.

LAW


100% Correct, when I 24 hour enduance raced
motorcycles we use to freeze the fuel before filling the
tank at every pit stop. We could get over a 1/2 a gallon
more fuel in a 6 gallon tank by freezing it.
 

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I don't check the fuel consumption on the wing as much as I do in our cage. Below is a snapshot of our Passat TDI with the trip computer set on "average MPG per trip" This was a DRY 20% humidity morning at the end of my 22 mile commute. When the humidity goes up the fuel mileage goes down to an average of 38 to 40 MPG per trip.


Click to enlarge...........

Turbo Diesel engines are a whole different animal"
 

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Mine went south when our great state leaders mandated that all gas sold in Fla had to be 10% corn gas. I was getting 41 now get 37mpg. Temps don't fluctuate much down here. Cool, warm, very warm and HOT.
 

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Mine went south when our great state leaders mandated that all gas sold in Fla had to be 10% corn gas. I was getting 41 now get 37mpg. Temps don't fluctuate much down here. Cool, warm, very warm and HOT.
WOW that is a huge drop in MPG

are u sure it was caused by corn ?
 

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Cold air is denser. The MAP sensor detects more pressure in the manifold and feeds more fuel to match the extra O2. One bonus to the loss of MPG is the gain in power. I love the extra power. I'm not yet poor enough to worry about the MPG.

Now, let's start a dabate over nitrogen in gasoline. Shell put nitro in their gas for a cleaner. My bike runs a little better on Shell than others and gets more MPG too.
 

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temp vs. gas mileage

My Suzuki Bandit 1200 got a consistant 44-45mpg in hot summer temps, but couldn't get over 41-42mpg in cooler temps... a noticeable difference. At first I thought it was merely the wintertime oxygenated formula out of the pumps on the East Coast from October thru February. A career mechanic I trust told me many motorcycle engines (especially in-line fours with carbs) burn much more efficiently at higher temps (fuel density, etc.). I tried really running the bike hard at high speeds for a couple of tanks last July, and got in return 46 mpg!

The moral to the story is to run your bike harder to increase mileage, fun factor, etc... at least that's the way I choose to interpret it.
 

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"What you are seeing is 100% normal. You will notice
with fuel injected motorcycles that at high altitude you
get way better gas mileage then you do at sea level.

WHY?? you might ask? is because the less air you have
the less fuel the computer will put out, the more air you
have the more fuel the computer will put out. Cold air
is better then hot air also, so you get worse mpg's at
cold temps.You also have less air at high altitude then
you have at sea level."

Not exactly.

The reason you get better mileage at altitude is because the air density is less, so there is less air that has to be pushed out of the way of the body moving through it. Hence it takes less horsepower to push the bike through the air.

Cold air is more dense = more work to move through it = lower mpg

An engine will need a given amount of air for a given horsepower and a given amount of fuel. Where an electronic fuel injected engine comes through is that is automatically and continuously adjust the fuel delivery to match the air flow, something a carburetor cannot do as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Oh, boy...... :popcorn:
 

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My Suzuki Bandit 1200 got a consistant 44-45mpg in hot summer temps, but couldn't get over 41-42mpg in cooler temps... a noticeable difference. At first I thought it was merely the wintertime oxygenated formula out of the pumps on the East Coast from October thru February. A career mechanic I trust told me many motorcycle engines (especially in-line fours with carbs) burn much more efficiently at higher temps (fuel density, etc.). I tried really running the bike hard at high speeds for a couple of tanks last July, and got in return 46 mpg!

The moral to the story is to run your bike harder to increase mileage, fun factor, etc... at least that's the way I choose to interpret it.

This is way I strest (fuel injected motorcycles")

Enjoy your Bandit, their a great motorcycle"
 

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"What you are seeing is 100% normal. You will notice
with fuel injected motorcycles that at high altitude you
get way better gas mileage then you do at sea level.

WHY?? you might ask? is because the less air you have
the less fuel the computer will put out, the more air you
have the more fuel the computer will put out. Cold air
is better then hot air also, so you get worse mpg's at
cold temps.You also have less air at high altitude then
you have at sea level."

Not exactly.

The reason you get better mileage at altitude is because the air density is less, so there is less air that has to be pushed out of the way of the body moving through it. Hence it takes less horsepower to push the bike through the air.

Cold air is more dense = more work to move through it = lower mpg

An engine will need a given amount of air for a given horsepower and a given amount of fuel. Where an electronic fuel injected engine comes through is that is automatically and continuously adjust the fuel delivery to match the air flow, something a carburetor cannot do as well.

I always find it funny how some people just have to
repeat the same thing someone else has said but they
reword it so they feel like they said something.. LOL"
 
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