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Discussion Starter #1
a bright lovely day everybody,

since u r all very helpful, i thought i would go ahead and ask: my front and rear suspension are very hard to the extent that i feel flyover (bridge) connectors hitting my head. i consulted my mechanic and he said its fine and its just firm ... and on high speeds like 120-130 miles i feel its ok but on rough roads with low speed its really bothering me.

my GL1800 is 2002 with 81000 miles on, and nothing has been done to suspension except routine checks and tightening, so do i have to change something to resolve such problem? i'm talking about front and rear (i dont have mechanical knowledge and dont know whether a new set of springs will do the job or is it more complicated)

thanks a lot
 

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If (and that is 'if") your bike has 81,000 miles on it your suspension is probably sacked. But wait... do not panic as parts to rebuild can be bought very cheap with practice. Rear shocks can be bought on EBay... preferably 2012, 2013, 2014 from bikes being triked. They are more robust than the older ones. Also Traxxion makes a nice shock.

As for the front there are many options. Most complain about the front being too soft. At very minimum, the forks should be taken apart and inspected with the oil, bushings and seals being replaced. Also the anti dive mechanism may be stuck which will cause a very stiff front end. Also new front springs are in order.

I would suggest you use Google to find the many, many posts on GL1800 suspension already on this board. There are hundreds.
 

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You might have a sticking ADV. An easy way to find out if it's causing your rough ride is to loosen its mount bolts and test ride it to see if there is a difference. Many fail from not having the brake fluid changed every 12k. An ADV job is to lock the front forks under certain braking conditions. One going bad does not relax and continues to seize the forks from up/down movement.
 

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DVDs

karimfadl,

Contact board member Fred Harmon. He sells a set of DVDs that will give you a whole bunch of maintenance information and how to do. You'll have to pay some extra shipping to get them to Egypt, but you will find that they will pay for themselves very quickly. I suspect that your suspension is weak and Fred's DVDs will show you how to service them.
Welcome to the forum.

Richard
 

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Just separate the two halves of the ADV and see if it doesn't ride a lot better if it does there is a fix for that and a simple disable to ADV will work wonders
 

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ADV quick check

My 02's Anti-Dive Valve (ADV) seized up a year ago and I debated whether to dial or replace it, in the process I chose to replace the valve. I also have learned a fast way to check if its stuck. Roll up to a parking barrier to brace the front wheel and release the brakes, give it a little gas and the front end should dive down 3 or 4 inches, if not it is stuck and needs service. It is very important to flush and replace your brake fluid regularly (12k miles). I clean up the valve every year a I like the ant-dive feature, but when disabled the ride is softer. As for the rear I hope you checked the shock preload setting.
 

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When the anti-dive valve sticks, it makes the entire bike feel rough, especially on small repetitive bumps like expansion joints. It sounds like this is a big part of your problem.

At 80k miles, your fork bushings are probably worn, and your fork oil also needs to be changed. I'd plan on doing a complete fork service, along with adding some stiffer fork springs and disabling the anti-dive valve. If you can locate a new rear shock, I'd also replace it. Traxxion makes both fork springs and a replacement rear shock that are excellent choices if you decide to go that route. There are other suspension modifications you may also want to consider, like installing a Traxxion Triple Tree and All Balls bearings. It all just depends on your budget. There are some alternative lower cost front fork spring solutions out there too, like Progressive and Race Tech.
 

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Did you try the simplest things first? Like tire pressures being too high? Rear shock preload? Tires too old (more than 5 years?) Desert heat will prematurely age tires, at least the Arizona desert heat does. :)

Tire pressures should be checked before they are ridden and heat up. Air pressure specs are standardized at 80F, so add about 1 psi for every 10 degrees F under 80, and subtract for over 80F ambient. Honda suggests 36/41 psi.
 

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If your suspension is hard, put in firmer springs.

It doesn't make any sense, but with 81,000 on the clock, it does.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks everybody for the generous support and rich information.

our highways in Egypt r rough and on high speeds like 120 or 135 mile/hr u find urself vibrating up and down due to such roughness, and i love to ride fast so i need to understand 2 points:

1- is disabling ADV decreases safety on such speeds and roads or it increases safety?

2- which is more in favor of safety on such speeds and roads, progressive or linear fork springs?

thanks a lot :)
 

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thanks everybody for the generous support and rich information.

our highways in Egypt r rough and on high speeds like 120 or 135 mile/hr u find urself vibrating up and down due to such roughness, and i love to ride fast so i need to understand 2 points:

1- is disabling ADV decreases safety on such speeds and roads or it increases safety?

2- which is more in favor of safety on such speeds and roads, progressive or linear fork springs?

thanks a lot :)
You should not disable the anti-dive valve unless you first replace the Honda fork springs with a stiffer set of springs. If you disable the valve and leave the Honda fork springs in the bike, the front will be way too soft and will dive too much when you use the brakes.

There are good and bad points to both progressive rate and straight rate springs. A progressive spring will cover a wider load range and is more forgiving when the load changes, but a linear spring will provide better control and a better ride if it is properly matched to the load. Personally, I like a straight rate spring better.
 
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