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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was getting the bike ready for winter storage today. I pulled the sparking plugs and put fogging oil in the cylinders. put dielectric grease on the plug caps and reinstalled the plugs torqueing them to 13 foot pounds. I was working on the right bank on the middle plug when I found I couldn't get the socket to seat on the plug. I looked inside the socket and found this rubber grommet in there. It looks like it might have come out of the plug cap of the rearmost spark plug since I had just been working there but it seems too big to go into that cap and in looking at the rest of the plug caps I don't seem to see this thing in the others. Does it somehow have to get squeezed into the plug cap? It seems like it would since it has some ribbing inside it which would seem to suggest it fit over the spark plug. Anyone seen this thing before?

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
actual spark plug sockets have a rubber grommet or sleeve in the socket to help hold the plug during removal and installation; could be that's what it is.
Thanks! While writing the post that thought occurred to me. I do not want to try shoving that thing down inside the spark plug boot if it actually belongs in the tool. I put it in the tool and its fits in there nicely. Perhaps that is what it is, but I hadn't seen it before now. I'll see what others have to say but it would be a relief if it is actually part of the tool.

Mark
 

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If it's a spark plug socket, it likely also has a hex at the end of the socket where the ratchet goes, so it can be turned with a wrench.
They usually 6 point sockets as well -- because plugs can be rusted in and can be heat damaged -- and the problem cause by a plug that gets rounded off is way worse than if it happens to many fasteners.

This thread go my curiosity up and I checked my sets (different ages and set qualities)

I quickly found 5 spark plug sockets.
2 of the sets have more than one ratchet drive size and had spark plug sockets in 2 drive sizes and for 2 spark plug hex sizes (5/8 and 13/16).


All 5 had the hex on socket top for use with a wrench and all still have the rubber ring inside.

I'm pretty sure the oldest one was purchased in the late '70's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If it's a spark plug socket, it likely also has a hex at the end of the socket where the ratchet goes, so it can be turned with a wrench.
They usually 6 point sockets as well -- because plugs can be rusted in and can be heat damaged -- and the problem cause by a plug that gets rounded off is way worse than if it happens to many fasteners.

This thread go my curiosity up and I checked my sets (different ages and set qualities)

I quickly found 5 spark plug sockets.
2 of the sets have more than one ratchet drive size and had spark plug sockets in 2 drive sizes and for 2 spark plug hex sizes (5/8 and 13/16).


All 5 had the hex on socket top for use with a wrench and all still have the rubber ring inside.

I'm pretty sure the oldest one was purchased in the late '70's.
The socket I was using is exactly that! I put the grommet in the socket and there it will remain. Crisis averted! 🙂
 

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OMG! I have to admit, I just learned another thing today.............
I went out to look at my spark plug socket in the garage, and there it was...............(y)

Just when I thought that I knew everything :unsure:.......lol
 
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If you used an actual spark plug socket, they have a rubber in them to protect from cracking the insulator.
Plus its there for another purpose, it "grips the spark plug" so you can pulled it out of the "spark plug hole" in the head...!

Ever tried removing a spark plug from a Honda auto engine (that's very deep down).....?????
 

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I've got 2-3 lengths of old spark plug wires in my tool box like this that I've used for years to retrieve spark plugs that are down very deep in the head on some models and the rubber retainer may be missing in the spark plug socket. I use the socket to break the plug loose and turn it a couple of turns and then remove the socket from the plug and install the length of old spark plug wire back on the plug and just turn and remove the plug. I also use it to install a new plug in that deep hole and it's worked great for many years.;)
 

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Fuel hose to fit over the spark plug, (forget what size). Cut it about six inches long. Use it to get the plug started on its threads in the spark plug hole. Then pull it off and finish with your socket.
I want to say it's a 3/8 fuel line....... I use the exact same thing, a fuel line that just fits onto the head of the plug............ I use it not only to retrieve the plug BUT to screw it in to the cylinder so I don't X/thread it, by accident............

Ronnie
10/28/21
 
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