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I've come to realise there are 5 types of people on these threads...
  1. Trolls stirring the pot (hey Fluke!).
  2. Owners of pre-2018 models who are annoyed that their bike isn't the latest/greatest anymore, can't or don't want to pay the money for the new one, and are desperate to find reasons to hate it so they can feel satisfied that they're not missing out anyway. This is human nature, I know I feel a bit like this whenever tech companies bring out new versions of products I own with features I don't have on my older version.
  3. Owners of pre-2018 models who have genuinely tried out the new bike, with the intent of buying, and have found something about it they can't live with. Storage is probably the thing.
  4. Owners of 2018+ bikes who spent a lot of money, and are trying to convince themselves they made a good call in purchasing it.
  5. Owners of 2018+ bikes who love them, and want to defend them - as is also human nature when you see people criticising, unfairly in your opinion, the things you love. They don't want people to read these threads and incorrectly think everyone hates the 2018+ when they know that they, at least, think it's a great bike.
People in category 2 will claim that they're in category 3; people in category 4 will claim that they're in category 5. You will never prove one way or the other whether that's true. That said, people who claim to be in category 3 who have never made the effort to test ride the bike I find suspicious, personally.
Brilliant response, but may I add:

6. People who see the horse is obviously long dead and they continue flogging it because they have nothing better to do

7. People who complain about things over which they have no control because the only time they're happy is when they're unhappy.

Please carry on with this excellent discussion.

Tim
 

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Why would a “younger” person want to pay twice as much for a Wing rather than buy a FJR or Concours?

Being younger, chances are they don’t have time to appreciate a touring bike. They are working full time and raising families! It’s a good chance they are also paying student loans and mortgages. Is “touring” just a weekend thing now?

What does the new Wing do twice as good as the Yamaha or Kawasaki?

I’m actually serious with these questions. Why would a younger person want a $30k bike just sitting in a garage where a $15k will do the same thing?

Buy and ride what you enjoy!
I'd say younger riders are buying the bike for the tech. The FJR & the C14 are both incredible, proven bikes, but they are workhorses and that's ok. They don't have all of the built in technology and comfort of the Goldwing. I'm definitely not knocking the other bikes. Nothing but respect for what you can get for the low buy-in price. Also, a lot of younger people these days don't see the 'Wing as a $27,000 bike, they see it as a $450/month payment, just like their cell phone, dental work, Netflix subscription and everything else they can finance.
 

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Regarding prices, I looked up a 1995 (Canadian) price list and the Goldwing was $20,000. When I run that by an inflation calculator that is $33,646 in 2020 dollars CDN So really no change other than inflation in 25 years.

In 1978 I believe I paid $5,500 but can't find my receipt. So somehow, when I was in my 20s and wanted the best, I bought a motorcycle that in todays dollars is $21,627
 

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It might be ridiculous if you ignore everything else he said and focused on just one thing. I don't know many people in their 30s who have no familiies, mortages, student loans and kids - let alone be able to take a month off at once. I was close to that but never discovered the GoldWing until I was 37. :(

I'd say you were/are an exception to the average guy in his 30s. I'm a little jealous, actually.
Plenty of people choose not to have kids, we’re not in the 1950s anymore.

Plenty of people in their 30s have good enough jobs that they can afford a few nice things despite having a mortgage. I mean, it’s a $20-30k motorcycle, not a $150k Ferrari. Some perspective please.

Plenty of people in their 30s get a few weeks of annual leave per year. I admit I’m lucky that I was able to work overtime to build extra leave in the year of my Alaska trip, but most people can take 2 weeks at least. Besides, the shorter the time available, the more likely you are to need a comfortable touring machine like the GW because you’ll have to do some big mileage days to squeeze in the journey before it’s time to get back to work.

And finally, it’s a motorcycle. Honda aren’t going to sell them in huge numbers whoever they pitch them to. Unless you’re Harley Davidson in North America, if you’re building motorcycles you’re making a niche product. They don’t need every 30-something year old to fit the profile of someone who would buy a GW, just enough of them to be profitable. Pulling numbers from the air, maybe a 2% increase in purchases in the 30-39 bracket might be worth a 5% decrease in the 70-79 bracket to Honda when long-term viability of the brand is factored in. Who knows? None of us really, but I bet a lot of clever number crunchers at Honda HQ do!
 

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Plenty of people choose not to have kids, we’re not in the 1950s anymore.

Plenty of people in their 30s have good enough jobs that they can afford a few nice things despite having a mortgage. I mean, it’s a $20-30k motorcycle, not a $150k Ferrari. Some perspective please.

Plenty of people in their 30s get a few weeks of annual leave per year. I admit I’m lucky that I was able to work overtime to build extra leave in the year of my Alaska trip, but most people can take 2 weeks at least. Besides, the shorter the time available, the more likely you are to need a comfortable touring machine like the GW because you’ll have to do some big mileage days to squeeze in the journey before it’s time to get back to work.

And finally, it’s a motorcycle. Honda aren’t going to sell them in huge numbers whoever they pitch them to. Unless you’re Harley Davidson in North America, if you’re building motorcycles you’re making a niche product. They don’t need every 30-something year old to fit the profile of someone who would buy a GW, just enough of them to be profitable. Pulling numbers from the air, maybe a 2% increase in purchases in the 30-39 bracket might be worth a 5% decrease in the 70-79 bracket to Honda when long-term viability of the brand is factored in. Who knows? None of us really, but I bet a lot of clever number crunchers at Honda HQ do!
Good post!

No kids here and I didn't go purchase a mansion house to be strapped into a huge mortgage......
It allowed me to afford other things in life........like my first Goldwing at 26-years old.
I worked hard to afford my toys and have a good life together with my wife.

Now retired and have a very nice retirement portfolio so I can really enjoy life........
Life can throw you unexpected financial curves, but a lot of those curves are self induced IMHO.
 

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I'd say younger riders are buying the bike for the tech. The FJR & the C14 are both incredible, proven bikes, but they are workhorses and that's ok. They don't have all of the built in technology and comfort of the Goldwing. I'm definitely not knocking the other bikes. Nothing but respect for what you can get for the low buy-in price. Also, a lot of younger people these days don't see the 'Wing as a $27,000 bike, they see it as a $450/month payment, just like their cell phone, dental work, Netflix subscription and everything else they can finance.
Excellent point. I wonder if this isn't what results in some of those low-mileage, garage queens that are just one or two years old. I don't understand how people can invest so much and then dump it such a short time later. Aside from unexpected health issues.
 

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Excellent point. I wonder if this isn't what results in some of those low-mileage, garage queens that are just one or two years old. I don't understand how people can invest so much and then dump it such a short time later. Aside from unexpected health issues.
Been there, done that. As someone who researches major purchases to the point of obsession (to avoid expensive mistakes) I have made the occasional "regretted purchase". The first was a Ducati....I lusted after one for years, but didn't want to drop $20K on a new one, so I searched for years for the right used one. Finally got a 2012 Multistrada that had an extended warranty and good service records. Within a month I was out $300 for an electronic key that didn't work and the extended warranty covered a $525 fuel sensor leak. Since the warranty was up in 6 months and I had a $1000 valve service due in 3K miles, I traded it in on a Versys 1000 to cut my losses early......never been happier. My second mistake was a Camaro.....never had a hot rod as a kid, so in my 50's I picked up a brand new limited edition 6-speed at a smoking price (20% off sticker). I will tell you it was a blast to drive......for the first 4 gears. After that it was a useless vehicle....a cup in the cup holder interfered with the grip on the shifter, there was no spare tire, the back seat was made for some form of dwarf sub-species, replacement tires were in the $400 range....you get the idea. Had that for 1300 miles and traded it for a 1 ton diesel truck......took a beating, but I was happier in the end. It was kind of like a diviorce: Expensive, but worth it.
 

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It took me a long time to get to a Wing and with the help of a POS Harley M8 it finally happened. If the Harley had not been a junker I would still be on it. When I was a kid the last thing I wanted was a Wing. At 59 I'm pretty much ok with it. There are a few things I find completely insane concerning the bike. The storage is to small. The clam shell bags really suck and there not removable. And all the third world ultra light plastics and uber thin paint. If Honda would have just put 1/4 lb more in the plastic it would have been so much better. And having the worst air filter change in the history of internal combustion engine used in any kind of transport does not bode well. And this motor should have had a modern eco version of v-tec. The mpg hypermilers could have had their cake and those of us that want to spend some time say north of 4k rpm could of had some ice cream. My 2006 Civic 1.8l R18 engine made 140hp/140tq and got the same hwy mpg. And speaking of Civic the navi is just a poor update of the system in the Civic. Not to mention the 2.1+EDR Bluetooth version and protocol was 10 years out of date in 2018. With all that said and Hondas best effort to ruin the bike, it is still a good motorcycle. Honestly I was going to buy a Wing regardless of Harley life and there will be a FJR purchased for my private delight. I wanted to own one of these bikes! My first Wing. I had test ridden several. And I really liked the geometry of the new front suspension. They missed the mark concerning the preload front and back a tad. But the way the front end works is fantastic! They ruined the Accord when they took the multi-link front end out of it. But here it is reborn in the Wing. Of all the Wings I've ridden in my life which kept me from buying any of them. This one is not bad. It's not a sport touring anything. Under the horrid plastics is a true grand tourer that will cross continents. The wife and I have no problem with the saddle or windshield. I don't like the bars and I find it a complete fail that Honda screwed that up. But a pair of Show Chrome bar shims made it better. I like the bike over all. But I do find it odd that it's not a Halo Bike. So here's to hoping Honda will do a mid cycle update like they do there cars every once in a awhile. Come back troll! :)
 

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I'm on my 14th wing. I now have a 20 tour manual and love it. I had a 19 tour dct and put 10700 miles on it in 13 mos including mountain riding and it was a great bike I just like shifting better. No the storage is smaller but what a sweet handling nimble motorcycle. The 1100 was a great wing. The 1200 was no improvement but the 1500 was and a great touring bike. The 2001 - 2017 wing real improvement on handling, smaller storage. I had 4 1800's the last a 2017. No the seat on any motorcycle will not fit everyone. I'm not a real aggressive rider but I'm not slow either and love curvy roads
I've had no problems with the 19 or 20 or in fact with any of them. I'm 82 yrs young.
Way to to NCBill, Got a year or two on you at 87, but still in the saddle. After 13 years on the Wing, went with another brand, yep, like it, I better, it will be my last. Happy trails my senior friend.
 

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I'm loving my 2019 CSC trike with the DCT. The more I ride it the more I figure it out and it just gets better. My 2015 Wing F6B was awesome as well but back problems moved me onto the trike.
 

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My 2 cents. I have a blue (they are the fastest you know) 2018 DCT Goldwing. I have owned it a year and have just over 7,000 miles on it. I had a Honda ST1300 before getting the Goldwing and really enjoyed it. Also owned a Honda Magna and Valkyrie Interstate. I am 60 and have been riding these 4 bikes for about 21 years. I am a huge Honda fan.

I bought the 2018 because it reminded me so much of my ST, but with 21st century technology. I would have never bought any of the older gen Goldwing - just too big and bus like for me. My wife does not ride with me so the 2 up/luggage capabilities of the older gen Goldwing is not something I need.

I am very, very pleased with my 2018. I am a big fan of the DCT. Initially I expected to hate DCT. A big part of riding is shifting, right? Then I rode a buddy's Africa Twin with DCT for a week in CO. After 1/2 day I was sold. I am not an expert rider and the DCT shifts as well or better than I do. To me it is one less thing to think about. I love the suspension, braking capability and technology (e.g. cruise, heated seat/grips, ride modes, suspension settings, Apple Car play, adjustable wind screen). I have added fog lights, backrest and highway pegs. The bike is not perfect. I can't seem to get the seat broken in and I wish the fuel tank/range capability was a little better. Stock tires were average at best (just replaced them with Dunlop Elite 4s, so much better). Bike is heavy and hard to get on center stand. I have had intermittent trouble with the left side saddlebag not wanting to lock/unlock properly. Nav system is not real intuitive. Some of the fit and finish could be improved.

I can certainly understand why the guys who loved the older generation Wings may not be fans of the new model. They are very different bikes. All things considered, it is superior to my other bikes (I guess at $25K it should be!). It is not the perfect bike, but very, very good. I am pleased with my purchase and wish Honda had released it a few years ago. At 60 most of my riding has already taken place.

IMG_0207.jpg
 

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New Honda's, mess all what goldwing was about, and the problem is, they will not correct it, sad.
If you have a old Goldwing, don't sell it for a new one, you will be disappointed
Sold my '06 with 110,000 miles and bought the 2019 Tour DCT. Couldn't be happier. The improvements are massive! Most issues are simply getting used to a new bike. Better acceleration, better mileage, better suspension, better steering, better handling, lower center of gravity - and the list goes on and on.
 

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The 2018 Wing is the bike for me and that is all that matters. Different riders have different needs. For the record if I were 20 years younger I probably would lean towards the BMW
 

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The 2018 Wing is the bike for me and that is all that matters. Different riders have different needs. For the record if I were 20 years younger I probably would lean towards the BMW
When I was 20 years younger I bought to brand new GL1500 Aspencade. (y) (y)
 
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