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I connected a pressure bleeder to the rear reservoir tube to really get a good bleed of rear system. How I did this isn’t not relevant at this point but all lines and hoses were filled with no air. Being a continuous pressure bleed plan, tiny amounts of air would have been forced completely through anyway.
With that said, I had 15 psi showing on the gage, valves open, no leaks and plenty of fresh fluid in tank. I let it stand for a few minutes to make sure pressure did not drop. So I went to the first bleeder at front left top caliper where is had my bleeder hose attached and cracked the bleeder and nothing happened. Checked everything again and still no bleed pressure, there should have been a mad rush of fluid. So I had my son press hard on peddle and hold it and I cracked bleeder again and fluid came out as normal, I shut bleeder. He let peddle up and obviously my pressure system fed more fluid to piston. We repeated this as a normal bleed procedure.
Question now to all is this, is the reservoir side of brake systems not open to the main brake hydraulic circuit? Is master cylinder piston design such that it closes off reservoir side to allow pressure bleeding? Is there check valve in there preventing pressure bleeding? Or is there a special position to move the peddle down a little that will open the cylinder spool to allow pressure bleeding? I can’t imagine Mother Honda’s assembly line having to spend time pushing on some peddle and pulling on levers to initially fill and bleed brakes. They must have a forced filling system of some kind.
 

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I am no expert but I would think it has something to do with the fact that it is a linked braking system, I believe it has a proportional valve in the lines somewhere. I am a new wing owner myself but from what I recall from my ST1300 which also had a linked system there was a specific way that the brakes had to be bleed.
The proportional valve allows the rear brake to deliver 2/3 of its pressure to the rear and 1/3 to the front. The front brake is just the opposite of 2/3rd to the front and 1/3rd to the rear. At least that is how the ST worked. I am pretty sure they are the same.
Tom
 

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IronMan
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ck tech forum and see if info there - should be . if not someone will chime in .
 
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