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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Gang,
Well, been a Darksider for quite a few years now and still love it. If any of you might have read my recent thread on brake replacement and break-in, you'll see I had to replace not only the rear brakes but, I replaced the rotor with a nice used one. I'm pretty sure I could turn that original rotor on a lathe and clean things up and, I will at a later date. But, while the wheel was off, and, the tire that I had on there was 8 years old (based on the DOT date on it, not how long I had it on there) and, its tread was down about 75%, I thought what the heck, let's just throw another tire on there.

So, I looked around at various tires. Discount had a Hancook Optimo 195 60 16 for $86.00. And, they had one in stock. So, I buzzed on down to them and told them I needed a tire for my little trailer. But, I'd never used them for this kind of thing before so, before I paid for anything, I asked that the service writer go take a look at my "trailer wheel" and make sure they could actually remove the old tire and mount the new one on there. "She" said "oh yeah, we can do this, no problem". But, she said, "we won't be able to balance it because the center hole in the wheel was/is too small for our machines to mount on". I said, "no problem" I'll not worry about it".

About 15 minutes later, and a total bill of $117 out the door, I was back on my way home with my new Hancook 195 60 16 Optimo. I then took a couple of hours to polish that (embarrassed to say) neglected rear wheel. Now, take a look at the new tire and, a new face on the wheel.
Scott
 

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Looks Nice!
 

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That's the same tire I used when I first went DS. Loved the ride, but discovered when I went into the twisty's a bit hard and rode up on the corner I experienced a tiny wiggle. The wiggle wasn't enough to get panicked about, just annoyed me knowing it was there. Other than that, it was great. We wound up going with a Pirelli P1 RF for our longer trips. I still have the Optimo as a backup, very good tire for the price.
 

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IronMan
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WHEEL LOOKS NICE !!! WHATS THE "TRAILER " LOOK LIKE ? :wink2::laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hey Gents,
I most certainly appreciate the nice comments. As stated in a couple of other posts about polishing wheels, I've been doing it since Christ was a young'n. Polishing aluminum, for anyone who's new to it, is LABOR. And it's nothing but LABOR. There is no magic elixir that you spray on and, vvvvvuuuuuallllllaaaa, you have super shiny wheels, AIN'T HAPPENING. So, with all that jargon stated, here's the deal. Much of the the process of getting to a point you're happy with, depends upon what kind of condition the wheels (or any aluminum) are in when you start the process.

If the wheel or, set of wheels, starts out in say, good condition, as say, NEW, then the process of getting them to a mirror finish is greatly shortened. All that's needed in a situation like that is some rouge and a good wool pad, on a drill. When I say "rouge", there's a good 1/2 dozen rouge types and colors. I won't go into them now but, some are for stainless, some for mild steel, some for aluminum, brass, copper and other soft metals and, there's others. The rouge family is designed mostly for rapid removal of material.

Then there are pastes and liquids. Some pastes, like Semi-Chrome, are good but, will not produce "as fine" of a mirror finish that say, Mothers will. I've used plenty of pastes, liquids and rouges.

What was used on the wheel you see in the picture was a rouge at first, it's the BROWN one made for aluminum. And that got the condition of the wheel close to what you see. Then, I used Zephyr 40, a product that, until recently, was a Costco online only product. It brought the wheel very close to what you see. Then, as a final touch, I used mothers on a rotating foam ball, with my 2500 rpm drill.

Mothers is, (as far as my knowledge and experience takes me) the "finest" (as in very finely ground materials) mix of polishing media that I've found, as a paste. Liquids of course, are finer but, may be too fine for various stages of polishing. And yes, I've used plenty of liquids and, found most of them to perform well. But, as of this time, Mothers is my go-to media for the finish that I'm happy with.
Scott

P.S. I just saw that last post on the use of a standard "Rubber" valve stem. Well, if I'd have thought about it, I'd have asked them to install a bent stainless one but, I didn't so, it'll have to be next time.
Scott
 

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Hey Gents,
I most certainly appreciate the nice comments. As stated in a couple of other posts about polishing wheels, I've been doing it since Christ was a young'n. Polishing aluminum, for anyone who's new to it, is LABOR. And it's nothing but LABOR. There is no magic elixir that you spray on and, vvvvvuuuuuallllllaaaa, you have super shiny wheels, AIN'T HAPPENING. So, with all that jargon stated, here's the deal. Much of the the process of getting to a point you're happy with, depends upon what kind of condition the wheels (or any aluminum) are in when you start the process.

If the wheel or, set of wheels, starts out in say, good condition, as say, NEW, then the process of getting them to a mirror finish is greatly shortened. All that's needed in a situation like that is some rouge and a good wool pad, on a drill. When I say "rouge", there's a good 1/2 dozen rouge types and colors. I won't go into them now but, some are for stainless, some for mild steel, some for aluminum, brass, copper and other soft metals and, there's others. The rouge family is designed mostly for rapid removal of material.

Then there are pastes and liquids. Some pastes, like Semi-Chrome, are good but, will not produce "as fine" of a mirror finish that say, Mothers will. I've used plenty of pastes, liquids and rouges.

What was used on the wheel you see in the picture was a rouge at first, it's the BROWN one made for aluminum. And that got the condition of the wheel close to what you see. Then, I used Zephyr 40, a product that, until recently, was a Costco online only product. It brought the wheel very close to what you see. Then, as a final touch, I used mothers on a rotating foam ball, with my 2500 rpm drill.

Mothers is, (as far as my knowledge and experience takes me) the "finest" (as in very finely ground materials) mix of polishing media that I've found, as a paste. Liquids of course, are finer but, may be too fine for various stages of polishing. And yes, I've used plenty of liquids and, found most of them to perform well. But, as of this time, Mothers is my go-to media for the finish that I'm happy with.
Scott

P.S. I just saw that last post on the use of a standard "Rubber" valve stem. Well, if I'd have thought about it, I'd have asked them to install a bent stainless one but, I didn't so, it'll have to be next time.
Scott
I used a short rubber stem on mine. Worked great, no problems airing up/checking tire.:smile2:
 

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Balancing

Hey Gang,
Well, been a Darksider for quite a few years now and still love it. If any of you might have read my recent thread on brake replacement and break-in, you'll see I had to replace not only the rear brakes but, I replaced the rotor with a nice used one. I'm pretty sure I could turn that original rotor on a lathe and clean things up and, I will at a later date. But, while the wheel was off, and, the tire that I had on there was 8 years old (based on the DOT date on it, not how long I had it on there) and, its tread was down about 75%, I thought what the heck, let's just throw another tire on there.

So, I looked around at various tires. Discount had a Hancook Optimo 195 60 16 for $86.00. And, they had one in stock. So, I buzzed on down to them and told them I needed a tire for my little trailer. But, I'd never used them for this kind of thing before so, before I paid for anything, I asked that the service writer go take a look at my "trailer wheel" and make sure they could actually remove the old tire and mount the new one on there. "She" said "oh yeah, we can do this, no problem". But, she said, "we won't be able to balance it because the center hole in the wheel was/is too small for our machines to mount on". I said, "no problem" I'll not worry about it".

About 15 minutes later, and a total bill of $117 out the door, I was back on my way home with my new Hancook 195 60 16 Optimo. I then took a couple of hours to polish that (embarrassed to say) neglected rear wheel. Now, take a look at the new tire and, a new face on the wheel.
Scott
I just took my tire and rim to the Bike shop and had them do the balancing. Works well but sometimes takes a lot of weights.
 

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I use a Harbor Freight static balancer for all motorcycle/darkside car tire balancing. It works excellent. P.s I ended up buying the same tire a couple months ago. I agree with the Wiggle comment above. The tire is very pliable in the sidewall. It went on easier than any motorcycle tire I have ever put on. And I have put on plenty using the old tire spoon and rim protector technique. Time honored.....
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hey gang,
I guess I didn't really finish my story. As far as them, (Discount tire) not being able to balance my tire/wheel assembly, I did it myself. I also have a Harbor Freight balancer. I used to have the static one but, I got rid of it a long time ago. Now, I have this version:

https://www.harborfreight.com/motorcycle-wheel-balancing-stand-98488.html

I got the tire and wheel all cleaned off and polished then, brought out the HF balancer. I have some spare tape weights hanging around. Yeah, the old LEAD styles!! When I first put the assembly on the balancer, the first thing I noticed was/is, the little "Red Dot" is not lined up with the valve stem, as it should be.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Lit...rome..69i57.5555j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

But, I wasn't going to to do two things. I was not going to go back to Discount and have them deflate the tire and adjust it. Second, I wasn't going to do it myself either. My thoughts were/are, just leave it as it is and, balance it as needed. So, I adjusted the cones on the balancer so the tire/wheel had zero play and let it find it's own heavy spot. I then started experimenting with my tape weight, 1/4 oz. at a time, until it no longer settled in the same spot every time. It took about 1 full ounce to balance that particular tire. I feel that's not too bad.

Want to see some REAL weight? Take a look at one of my Jeep tire/rim assemblies. Now there's some weight!
Scott
 

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