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Hiya…
Just introducing myself.

Been riding since 1989, only owned two bikes- Yamaha Radian , and a Yamaha VStar 1100. I’m mostly a commuter and local pleasure rider but I am planning a x-country trip this summer. I’m shopping for the right bike and I’m pretty sure it is the Goldwing. So I am really excited about getting started.

The longest trip I’ve ever taken was a long weekend: SF<->Phoenix; went down for a three-game Giants stand. Put on about 2000 miles over the 5 day period, mostly in the two 800-mile legs down and back.

This summer will be my first real serious touring trip. I have a couple of months…I figure there will be some 10 hour days, but mostly shorter rides. I’m hoping to hop from one MLB city to another as I cross back-and-forth. Will be visiting friends and family along the way.

I’d welcome any advice/opinions about making a 2-month, 10000-mile trip fun, comfortable, safe, interesting, etc.

Also interested in opinions about working with Honda dealerships.

-AS
 

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Welcome from SE Idaho!!! Good luck in the search, ride safe and keep the shiny side up. :grin2: As for your trip, I'll give the few suggestions I can, hopefully they'll help.

First, 10 hour days do not make for enjoyable, comfortable, or safe trips. Even on a Goldwing, the seat gets a bit uncomfortable after too many hours. 10,000 miles in 2 months is very doable, just break it up into 5 or so hour days that give you time to enjoy the scenery and the ability to stop and see some of the great country you're passing through. It also gives you the opportunity to rest and relax at the end of the day. Touring should be enjoyable, not punishment, and that 10 hour ride is for naught if you fall asleep during the game you rushed to see.

Concerning Honda dealers, after you have a route and schedule planned, do a search of the dealers along your route. Check the reviews and see which ones you want as a "go to" dealer should you need them. A one star dealer might be closer, but if a few more miles gets you to a 4 1/2 to 5 star dealer, go the distance. Good luck and ride safe.
 

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I'l try and keep my recommendations down to 10. LOL Others will chime in as well and you will have no end of randomly acquired wisdom as a result.

1.) Know the bike for several months and several thousand miles before you start your trip. You need to know what the bike sounds and feels like when everything is working properly, so that you'll be able to know if/when something is amiss.
2.) Unless you will be starting out on a new bike; do any and all routine maintenance items such that at the beginning of your trip all routine maintenance intervals are at mile 0.
3.) Start with new tires and be prepared to purchase another set before you reach 10,000 miles.
4.) Be prepared for all sorts of weather: Rain, Snow, Hail, Ice . . . . just because it's summer here doesn't mean it'll be like that everywhere. I've had to ride through a snowstorm in Wyoming in August. $h!t happens.
5.) Know how to, and fully expect to find yourself in a situation where you will need to repair a flat tire when you are in the middle of nowhere, at night, in the rain, etc. Maybe more than once!
6.) Bring a set of laminated road maps. I like the one's the Harley Owners Group (H.O.G.) puts out annually. Cut the pages out and have them laminated so that they'll survive when wet.
7.) Join GWRRA if for no other reason than to have a copy of "The Gold Book" with you.
8.) Make sure your bike and your medical insurance policies are current and will be for the duration of your trip.
9.) Know what you will do "If"! Decide what you will do "if" something happens before you leave. Not just you and your bike. Things can intrude on your adventure from the outside that may not be fully anticipated. Stuff happens!
10.) Make sure someone back home knows where and when you should be somewhere. They should have an extra set of keys and copies of any other documents (Registration, Drivers License, etc.) as well as money and a spare credit card that they can overnight you if necessary.

One last thing: Bring a digital camera and take lots of pictures. Then post them on this website. Make it look and sound like you're having a much better time than you really are, no matter how much fun you're having!
 
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I am now wondering if this NEW GUY is a friend of mine. MY friend is wanting to buy a Wing and travel to Chicago from Los Angeles. He knows how to ride a motorcycle very well BUT he thinks he is going to make the 2,000 mile journey(each direction) in 2 days. As not to waste any time because he wants to only take a minimal amount of time away from work. I think 1,000 mile days are crazy. Averaging 70mph that's 14 hrs on the bike each day. Insane amount of seat time. I think my buddy is gonna forget the whole idea and FLY to Chicago. What do I know anyway? I have done some crazy **** myself.......Now I count myself older and wiser.
 

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@Bluehighways has a good list, although re:#1, I've jumped on new-to-me Goldwings and road them 1,100 miles home

#4 is very key and Weatherbug and Google is your friend. We just returned yesterday evening from a 1,500 mile ride up through Texas, across SE OK, into AR, down through LA and back home, never on an interstate. As you know the weather Saturday afternoon/evening was more than interesting. Our original plan was to ride from Cabot, AR down to Minden, LA on Saturday afternoon. Because of the weather, we headed due south and then towards Pine Bluff, AR. Got to a truck stop just before the tornado warnings. Stayed there for a while and once it cleared some, headed south again. We didn't get very far - only to Fordyce, AR and grabbed a hotel room. We've had several Spring and Summer trips like this, including the hail, lightening and tornadoes bluehighways talks about (but no snow) in CO, AR, TN, IN, OH, etc. Flexibility in schedule is important.

I'll add #11 - take out a secondary/emergency credit card from your wallet and put it in the trunk. When you've been riding in really bad weather and are frazzled you might just leave your wallet and phone on your trailer at the gas station in Fordyce and forget to grab them. :) The phone made it the 3 slow miles (25mph speed limit in town), but the wallet did not and I didn't find it back tracking. Fortunately, my wife's wallet was in the trunk.

#12 - how to do a long day. Long days are by hours, not miles because of the roads you select and how hot it is. We leave basically at first light - no coffee, no breakfast, just go. Ride for two hours to a nice breakfast spot and take your time with breakfast and refuel the bike and wash off the double bugs from your shield. Ride another two hours, take a good break, drink a full bottle of water and refuel. Go another two and have lunch. Continue this process until you're ready to stop for the day. We can easily do 600 miles like this and have done much more. If you're by yourself, tell yourself you can stop for the night anywhere you want and ride on until you decide to stop. I've done +1,000 in a "day" on the interstate stopping every two hours and stopping when I wanted.

#13 - if you've gotten new boots, break them in before you go. Nothing worse than shins, ankles and/or feet that hurt because of new boots.
 
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