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I just picked up my Wing after having a set of Metz's spooned on. Haven't run Metz's before--just E3's. I have to say the bike feels strange with these new tires. For one thing, it seems there is a subtle shake or wobble at low speeds--under 35 mph. For another, the bike feels sort of stiff, or wooden, yet it rolls into turns, almost diving around a corner. I wondered if they installed bias ply tires or mounted the front tire on backwards. Got home and after allowing the tires to cool down, I checked the tire pressure: 41 psi front and 42 psi rear, exactly what is on the sidewall. Aside from that, they ride and roll well. They just feel very different from the E3s, which give the bike a light feel in the front end. The Metzelers make it feel slow handling, or a bit heavy when going around corners. I haven't had them out doing any curves yet, so the jury is still out.

Does anyone running Metzes have any suggestions to make them feel lighter-handling? I've read about tire pressures that are all over the range from 36 to 50 psi. I don't want to over inflate the tires, but I don't want my bike to be sluggish-feeling. I hope I haven't made a mistake with these Metzelers.
 

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Once you get them scrubbed in, they'll feel better.
 

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I can't stand the way a matched set of Metzler tires feel, nor can I stand the way a matched set of bridgestones feel....

BUT

I LOVE, and I ride very hard, I L - O - V - E the feel of a stoner front and a metzler rear.

I hope that helps you out a bit.

I would check your suspension too.

Quiet place... turn bike key to acc position. Set preload to zero. Put your head near the battery and listen very closely as you hold the UP preload adjustment button. Let go of the button the very second you hear the noise (coming from the preload adjuster) drop in tone. (Sound gets deeper as it comes under load.

Now look at your display and note the number.

I have seen preloads go all the way to 14 before they became under load meaning they did nothing until they hit 14.

If your preload is out of whack that could be part of your problem.

I would also HEAVILY suspect the steering stem bearings.

How many miles on the bike?

Are you going to Wing Ding? If so.... look for a tye dye dragon on the trunk of a gold, goldwing and that'll be me.
 

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The Metezlers are "rounder" in profile than a lot of other tires. I've run them on all my HD's once the stock Dunlops were gone. Double check your tire pressure....use the numbers off Metezler's website, not Honda's recommended pressure. I used to run 44-48 in the rear on my HD as per the tire manufacturer's recommendations. Like another poster mentioned....wait until you scrub them in. :thumbup:
 

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I am not really a big fan of metz tyres so i would just switch brands when you wear this set out personally i like the Bridgestone or the Avons

Cheers :thumbup:
 

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The Metezlers are "rounder" in profile than a lot of other tires.
This is a big part of what you're feeling. It's the feeling like it's just going to fall over when you start a turn, right?

The flatter profile tires you had on there before caused you to keep counter-steering while in a corner, or else the bike had a tendency to stand up in the corners. So you "learned" to compensate by always giving steering input during a turn.

The Metz (being a rounder profile) is actually more balanced in a corner. It might seem strange now, but give it a bit of time, and the bike will stay in the lean with zero input as you will learn to stop compensating.

YMMV of course, but hopefully once these are scuffed in and you get used to them, you'll enjoy what lots of others have found.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This is a big part of what you're feeling. It's the feeling like it's just going to fall over when you start a turn, right?

The flatter profile tires you had on there before caused you to keep counter-steering while in a corner, or else the bike had a tendency to stand up in the corners. So you "learned" to compensate by always giving steering input during a turn.

The Metz (being a rounder profile) is actually more balanced in a corner. It might seem strange now, but give it a bit of time, and the bike will stay in the lean with zero input as you will learn to stop compensating.

YMMV of course, but hopefully once these are scuffed in and you get used to them, you'll enjoy what lots of others have found.
You hit the nail on the head--feels like it's going to fall over. Thanks for that observation. At least I know what to expect, now.

I just serviced the rear shock spring actuator oil reservoir/motor, and it starts working right at #1 now. Was waiting until 7 before you could hear it start taking up a load.

Bike has 74500 on it, but has All-Balls tapered head bearings in it, torqued properly.

The sidewall on the rear tire says max cold air inflation figure is 42 psi. But I'll wait until the tires are properly scrubbed in before I start playing around with different tire pressures.

Thanx for the input, guys. It's been helpful. At least I understand why they feel they way they do, now.
 

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I loved the Metz when new, stuck like glue in the rain on the ride home after being installed at Cats Cade. It'd be hard to go back to a round tire now, though.
 

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I really like the grip of the Metzelers. After many sets, I swapped to Stones in search of higher mileage (which I found). The Stones do good but the Metzelers seem more sure-footed and held up good under sport riding.

That being said, beware of the Metzeler Marathons produced in Brazil. Most I have encountered lately require entirely too much weight to balance. My buddy ordered a set over the internet and received the Brazilian version. They would not balance with less than 4.5 oz of weights (front or rear). We broke the tire back down, checked the balance of the bare rim, re-mounted the tire, re-positioned 6 or 8 times...no joy.

Contacted vendor, vendor contacted Metzeler who indicated that they needed to go to an authorized Metzeler dealer for balancing. Buddy called and then, took them to the local Honda dealer for balancing. The first thing the dealer asked when he walked in the door was, "what's the country of origin for the tire?"...when he told them Brazil, they just shook their heads. Going through the process, once the dealer hit 3.5 oz of weights, they quit trying to balance them as Metzeler calls the tires "in spec" if it balances with 3.5 or less oz. of weights. The dealer said that 9 out of 10 Brazilian Metzelers won't balance with less than 3.5 ounces. The dealership, then, generated a report for him so that he could send them back for credit.

He bought a set of German-made Metzelers from the dealership. Front tire balanced as mounted with no weight added and the rear took one 1/2 oz weight to balance.

From all accounts, the German-made tires do not have this balancing problem. This topic, also, shows up on several other bike forums.

Z
 

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I can't stand the way a matched set of Metzler tires feel, nor can I stand the way a matched set of bridgestones feel....

BUT

I LOVE, and I ride very hard, I L - O - V - E the feel of a stoner front and a metzler rear.

I hope that helps you out a bit.

I would check your suspension too.

Quiet place... turn bike key to acc position. Set preload to zero. Put your head near the battery and listen very closely as you hold the UP preload adjustment button. Let go of the button the very second you hear the noise (coming from the preload adjuster) drop in tone. (Sound gets deeper as it comes under load.

Now look at your display and note the number.

I have seen preloads go all the way to 14 before they became under load meaning they did nothing until they hit 14.

If your preload is out of whack that could be part of your problem.

I would also HEAVILY suspect the steering stem bearings.

How many miles on the bike?

Are you going to Wing Ding? If so.... look for a tye dye dragon on the trunk of a gold, goldwing and that'll be me.
DJ,

Thanks for the post. Should you do your preload test with some weight on the bike, say another rider of the same weight ? Does it even matter?
TIA
Bob in St. Augustine
 
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